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eBook Reconceiving Women: Separating Motherhood from Female Identity download

by Ireland.,Mardy S. Ireland

eBook Reconceiving Women: Separating Motherhood from Female Identity download ISBN: 0898621232
Author: Ireland.,Mardy S. Ireland
Publisher: The Guilford Press; 1 edition (June 1, 1993)
Language: English
Pages: 195
ePub: 1878 kb
Fb2: 1474 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: docx lit rtf lrf
Category: Different
Subcategory: Medicine and Health Sciences

Reconceiving Women book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Reconceiving Women book. According to recent surveys, approximately 40% of American women.

It provides valuable insights for anyone interested in women's studies and the psychology of women, and serves as an excellent textbook for courses in these fields. From Publishers Weekly

Includes bibliographical references (p. 171-187) and index.

Includes bibliographical references (p. Childless in the 1990s: The "other" woman and why now? -. - The traditional woman: Childless - The transitional woman: Child-free and childless - The transformative woman: Child-free - The development of female identity: facts or fictions? -. - Weaving an alternative understanding - The gendered view of identity: Limitations and possibilities - Women but not mothers.

The "academic book" had struck a chord and found broad appeal.

Acknowledging the distinction child-free became critical as a legitimate choice for women. The work was the subsequent subject of a doctoral thesis. The "academic book" had struck a chord and found broad appeal.

The book Motherhood and Choice: Uncommon Mothers, Childfree Women, Amrita Nandy is published by Zubaan Books.

Acknowledging the distinction child-free became critical as a legitimate choice for women.

Acknowledging the distinction child-free became critical as a legitimate choice for women. Yes, this would make a good choice No, never mind. Thank you for helping! Your input will affect cover photo selection, along with input from other users. Listen to this article.

Women without children : the effects of childlessness on sex-role identity, psychological well-being, and life course schemas"by.

New York : Guilford Press, 1993 ISBN 9780898620160. Mardy Ireland has been married twice and openly lived with a female partner in Hawaii, and was a partner of Teri Quatman in the Bay Area for many years, whom she thanked in her most recent book. thesis by Laura Lynn Monschau; Pacific Graduate School of Psychology. Women without children : the effects of childlessness on sex-role identity, psychological well-being, and life course schemas"by.

New York: Encounter Books. The rush to st discourse and women’s autonomy.

New York: The Guilford Press. New York: Encounter Books. Lindemann Nelson, H. 2001. Damaged identities, narrative repair. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. 2002. Signs 26(3): 735–773. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

According to recent surveys, approximately 40% of American women between the ages of 18 and 44 do not have children. Yet these women are virtually missing from accounts of women's lives. In this important new work, Mardy Ireland defines a place for women outside the parameters of motherhood and gives voice to the significant number of women who are not mothers. She draws extensively from interviews with over 100 childless women from various ethnic and educational backgrounds, demonstrating the myriad ways they came to view themselves as complete adults without recourse to the traditional defining criteria of motherhood. Her work offers all women--mothers and nonmothers alike--a vision of self-defined adulthood and a recognition that every woman is the subject of her own life. Challenging the assumption of deprivation or deviance that is traditionally applied to childless women in psychological theory and popular culture, Dr. Ireland reframes childlessness as a concept and lays a groundwork for an expanded view of women's identity and psychic development. Using contemporary psychoanalytic theory, she reexamines female identity development and presents a positive interpretation of women who--for whatever reason--are not mothers.To contrast and compare the experiences of her interview subjects, she places them within the changing psychosocial context of the last few decades and categorizes them according to their reasons for childlessness. Included are: 'traditional' women, who are childless by reasons of infertility or health complications; 'transitional' women, who are not mothers because of delaying circumstances; and 'transformative' women, who have actively chosen not to bear children in order to develop lives beyond the field of motherhood. The legend of Lilith, a creation story of the first woman, described in the last chapter, places both female desire and female power in a longstanding historical and mythic context. Animated by excerpts, quotes, and stories from the many interviews, RECONCEIVING WOMEN: SEPARATING MOTHERHOOD FROM FEMALE IDENTITY is illuminating for general readers and professionals alike. It provides valuable insights for anyone interested in women's studies and the psychology of women, and serves as an excellent textbook for courses in these fields.
Comments: (2)
Phalaken
This is another great book that supports women who choose to not have children. The author theorizes that women can fall into one of three catagories (or a combination thereof): Traditional, Transitional, and Transformative. Pyschological theories abound and there are personal stories about real women. There's a little too much Freud for my taste - but it does help the reader get the full picture not only from the author's view, but from ordinary women and the world of psychology as well. This book is a little more in-depth than some other books on the subject -it's not a quick read- but is well worth the time invested. I think psychology and women's studies students - even if they don't agree witht the content - should read this book. I really hope the author is right when she talks about a future day when people will shudder in disbelief at the cruel stereotypes that were directed at childfree women - just as we do now at past thinking that a woman not married by the age of 25 was an old spinster!
MOQ
This is one of the most intelligent books on childless and childfree women that I've ever read. Despite being a little dense and relying too much on psychoanalytic theory (I would very much have liked to see some discussion of Adlerian psychology on this topic), this is a strong exploration of the topic. It discusses and provides sympathetic examples of women who do not have children for various reasons, and analyzes why childless women are so disturbing to society. This is a solidly academic book, but is worth reading if you're genuinely interested. Much better than other books I've read.