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eBook Banning Queer Blood: Rhetorics of Citizenship, Contagion, and Resistance (Albma Rhetoric Cult Soc Crit) download

by Jeffrey A. Bennett

eBook Banning Queer Blood: Rhetorics of Citizenship, Contagion, and Resistance (Albma Rhetoric Cult  Soc Crit) download ISBN: 0817316647
Author: Jeffrey A. Bennett
Publisher: University Alabama Press; First edition (July 14, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 208
ePub: 1128 kb
Fb2: 1932 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf lrf mobi docx
Category: Different
Subcategory: Medicine and Health Sciences

In Banning Queer Blood, Jeffrey Bennett frames blood donation as a. .traces the intersection of HIV/AIDS, blood supplies, the Red Cross, and queerness over the last quarter–century.

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Albma Rhetoric Cult & Soc Crit). Bennett shows how the rhetorical power of ‘blood’ as a metaphor of national belonging outweighs epidemiological knowledge about blood.

In Banning Queer Blood, Jeffrey Bennett frames blood donation as a.

rhetorics of citizenship, contagion, and resistance. Diseased citizenship and the rhetoric of scientific deliberation.

In Banning Queer Blood, Jeffrey Bennett frames blood donation as a performance of civic identity closely linked to the meaning of citizenship. However, with the advent of AIDS came the notion of blood donation as a potentially dangerous process. Bennett argues that the Food and Drug Administration, by employing images that specifically depict gay men as contagious, has categorized gay men as a menace to the nation. The FDA's ban on blood donation by gay men remains in effect and serves to propagate the social misconceptions about gay men that circulate within both the straight and gay communities today. Bennett explores the role of scientific research cited by these banned-blood policies and its disquieting relationship to government agencies, including the FDA. Bennett draws parallels between the FDA's position on homosexuality and the historical precedents of discrimination by government agencies against racial minorities. The author concludes by describing the resistance posed by queer donors, who either lie in order to donate blood or protest discrimination at donation sites, and by calling for these prejudiced policies to be abolished.