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eBook Your Brain After Chemo: A Practical Guide to Lifting the Fog and Getting Back Your Focus download

by Dan Silverman

eBook Your Brain After Chemo: A Practical Guide to Lifting the Fog and Getting Back Your Focus download ISBN: 0738213918
Author: Dan Silverman
Publisher: Da Capo Lifelong Books; 1 edition (May 25, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1131 kb
Fb2: 1177 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: docx txt mbr lit
Category: Different
Subcategory: Medicine and Health Sciences

Thank you Dan for all of your hard work with you and your team

Thank you Dan for all of your hard work with you and your team. I hope you understand how uplifting this is for cancer patients/survivors. When the reader completed the book, he felt assured that the symptoms that he experienced were real, that he was not alone and that there were ways to counteract the fog.

Want to read all pages of Your Brain After Chemo A Practical Guide to. .

Your Brain After Chemo A Practical Guide to Lifting the Fog and Getting Back Your Focus Book Quotes 1m1lY4r-4m11n Your Brain After Chemo A Practical Guide to Lifting the Fog and Getting Back Your Focus Audio Book, Your Brain After Chemo A Practical Guide to Lifting the Fog and Getting Back Your Focus books. Манхеттен Нью-Йорк - Нью-Йорк, США - Проездной тур - 4K UHD - Продолжительность: 3:40:33 GlobeTrotterAlpha Recommended for you. 3:40:33.

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Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-272) and index. Talking with your oncologist - Vulnerable time - Rethinking "chemo brain" - Q & A with your doctor - Symptoms and signs - I found my keys, but I lost myself - Relationships - Multitasking, word retrieval, memory, and concentration - Fatigue and depression - Measuring forgetfulness - Body of evidence - Molecules. Behaving badly - Healthy brain - Unhealthy brain - Hormones: his and hers - Getting your brain back on track - Depressing days? -.

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as chemo brain, the mental cloudiness cancer patients often notice before, during, and after chemotherapy.

In this episode, host Kim Thiboldeaux and guests will discuss what is commonly referred to as chemo brain, the mental cloudiness cancer patients often notice before, during, and after chemotherapy. While the exact cause remains unknown, Kim will be joined by two experts to discuss what you or your loved one can do to cope with this side effect. Guests include Dan Silverman, MD, PhD; and award-winning journalist Idelle Davidson, co-authors of "Your Brain After Chemo: A Practical Guide to Lifting the Fog and Getting Back Your Focus.

Even years after treatment people have reported problems with memory, concentration, multitasking, and word retrieval. Davidson combine cutting-edge science and true stories to demonstrate that chemo brain is not a figment of your imagination. Silverman and Idelle Davidson combine cutting-edge science and true stories to demonstrate that chemo brain is not a figment of your imagination

Your Brain After Chemo: A Practical Guide to Lifting the Fog and Getting Back Your Focus (1st e. Silverman, D. Dy C. Castellon, S. A. (2007).

Your Brain After Chemo: A Practical Guide to Lifting the Fog and Getting Back Your Focus (1st e. Boston: Da Capo Lifelong Books. Altered frontocortical cerebellar, and basal ganglia activity in adjuvant treated breast cancer survivors 5-10 years after chemotherapy.

Chemotherapy saves lives, but new studies including research led by coauthor Dr. Dan Silverman, reveal that the agents used to kill cancer cells may also impair normal brain function. Even years after treatment, people report problems with memory, concentration, multitasking, and word retrieval. Silverman and Idelle Davidson combine cutting-edge science and true stories to demonstrate that chemo brain is not a figment of your imagination. With its invaluable strategies and straightforward nine-step program specifically tailored to re-energizing the brain, Your Brain After Chemo gives patients the coping skills to move on with their lives.
Comments: (7)
roternow
I am not quite finished yet. I've had chemobrain for 17 years now, post breast cancer, which in my case was early onset. My particular long term chemo brain stuff is chronic fatigue, no matter how much I sleep, attention issues, and with my work in art, if I don't know exactly what I'm doing and if I make maybe one mistake, or I'm trying to do too many pieces at one time, my brain totally spins out of control. When I've been able to work, I've found I can no longer do an 8 hour day and flex-schedules makes me violently physically ill because the brain can't handle it. But reading this book (and one I've suggested our library purchase) made me feel "at home". I could see myself in the pages. One of my closest friends in 2012 went behind my back to tell others, and ask for recommendations, about me getting mental health and then came over and screamed at me that there was no such thing as chemo brain, past ending chemotherapy. It was horribly hurtful and I am very wary of that person to this day. She was not in the same location I was when I had cancer, and to "keep me busy" had me do the first edit on her first novel. It was hard energy wise, but I did it. But she has no clue what going through all of this is; she just thinks she does. This has, so far, validated for me what I already knew, I'm not "crazy".
Gavirus
I purchased this book after reading about it through a Cancer Assistance Group online. I did not know this type of research existed let alone offered in a book. I was diagnosed with Stage 4 Colon Cancer in 2012, received radiation and chemotherapy. Memory loss, and brain fog are everyday events for me to this day, even after being almost a year and a half in remission. I thought I was crazy before reading this book. I can't count how many times relatives or friends of mine had to repeat certain things already said to me before, several times! It was and IS still frustrating to this day, but to know that there is proof and research being done, well that is definitely assisting in my abilities to continue striving in life. This book not only explains how chemotherapy affects the brain, but it offers stories from others, research/data, and ways to improve your memory. It's such a sigh of relief to know that I am not alone when it comes to 'chemo-brain' as may call it.

Thank you Dan for all of your hard work with you and your team. I hope you understand how uplifting this is for cancer patients/survivors.

-Darrin
Globus
As a cancer survivor whose treatments caused significant cognitive impairment, this book has been a godsend. It's very sensible, well-written, and its utility for me has been enormous.

For many people, losing some cognitive function doesn't seem so awful. For me, it was a calamity, as I think it must be for many (the numbers are HUGE-- as many as 25% of people who've done chemo have diminished cognitive functioning after 5 years. Considering that people getting chemo number in the millions in the US, that represents a tragic loss).

My own cognitive function returned, but it took a lot of effort over a couple of years. Much of one's recovery from loss of cognitive function, I found, involves developing compensatory strategies-- knowing how to re-arrange your ways of doing things so you make fewer mistakes. This book's tips and tricks about how to get functioning again are invaluable.

This would also be a great book for families and caregivers of people recovering from cancer, since it clearly explains what the cancer survivor often cannot properly express (it's hard to describe your brain with your brain not functioning correctly). It also does a huge service by teasing apart how different chemotherapies have different side effects.

A book on this subject could easily be grim, but there's just the right amount of lightening up and humor along with the more sobering truths. Learning how to laugh at oneself is a vital part of the recovery process.

A great addition to the growing literature of this illness.
Varshav
After four rounds of chemo for my breast cancer, I very clearly had difficulties remembering, following through with what I had started or navigating through the demands of the day. My cognitive defecit wore me down both physcially and emotionally. When I spoke to professionals on my healthcare team, the reaction was that I should be" happy I was alive or ,"why didn't I go back to work?" I felt confused about my cognitive decline, scared, helpless and insulted. "Why would I make this up?? Do you think I want to feel this way?"

After I spotted the book, "You Brain After Chemo" at the bookstore, I could not believe my good fortune. I called my brother in California and he said, you are now validated and acknowledged for your debilitating issues. There was now a name for my symptoms, and thankfully Silverman and Davidson put chemo brain on the map. Their book brought the fog to life with their scientific explantion of chemo brain, actual stories for people who sufffered with the fog and some very real and practical suggestions for remediating some of the symptoms. When the reader completed the book, he felt assured that the symptoms that he experienced were real, that he was not alone and that there were ways to counteract the fog. Although it was clear that there will be additional information on the topic as time goes on, the real discussions began in Your Brain After Chemo.

Who should read this book? Clearly, every professional who works with patients who go through chemo therapy. First we fight for our life,and with professionals up to date Your Brain After Chemo: A Practical Guide to Lifting the Fog and Getting Back Your Focusknowledge on chemo brain we can fight for a better quality of life.
Timberahue
The best purchase I have made in a while. My only regret is that I didn't stumble across it sooner. Now I know that I am not going crazy, chemo brain is a thing and a thing that the ADA recognizes as a disability, As I read my book I was highlighting ALOT. I related to ALOT of the contents.