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eBook The Future of Imprisonment download

by Michael Tonry

eBook The Future of Imprisonment download ISBN: 0195314107
Author: Michael Tonry
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (July 22, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1484 kb
Fb2: 1619 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mbr docx lrf azw
Category: Different
Subcategory: Law

The Future Of Imprisonment book.

The Future Of Imprisonment book. The imprisonment rate in America has grown by a factor of five. Professor Michael Tonry is the McKnight Presidential Professor of Criminal Law and Policy, director of the Institute on Crime and Public Policy of the University of Minnesota, and a Scientific Member of the Max Planck Institute on Comparative and International Criminal Law in Freiburg, Germany.

The Future of Imprisonment is a valuable contribution to our understanding of how a malignant institution has not only endured in. .In updating the 1974 work of Norval Morris, Michael Tonry has developed some powerful themes.

The Future of Imprisonment is a valuable contribution to our understanding of how a malignant institution has not only endured in the United States, but thrived. Prisons are necessary, but better results can, and should be, achieved with a more thoughtful and systematic approach for individual offenders through rational sentencing, continued improvement in prison life, and ultimately, a successful re-entry into the community.

The imprisonment rate in America has grown by a factor of five since 1972. The Future of Imprisonment unites some of the leading prisons and penal policy scholars of our time to address these fundamental questions. Inspired by the work of Norval Morris, the contributors look back to the past twenty-five years of penal policy in an effort to look forward to the prison's twenty-first century future.

Электронная книга "The Future of Imprisonment", Michael Tonry

Электронная книга "The Future of Imprisonment", Michael Tonry. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Future of Imprisonment" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Future of Imprisonment. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles. The Future of Imprisonment. The imprisonment rate in America has grown by a factor of five since 1972. Publisher: Oxford University Press.

The Future of Imprisonment" unites some of the leading prison and penal policy scholars of our time to address .

The Future of Imprisonment" unites some of the leading prison and penal policy scholars of our time to address fundamental questions. 1. Has the prison a future?, Michael Tonry - 2. Crime, law, and the community: dynamics of incarceration in New York City, Jeffrey Fagan - 3. Restoring rationality in punishment policy, Alfred Blumstein - 4. Limiting retributivism, Richard S. Frase - 5. Sentencing reform "reform" through sentencing information systems, Marc L. Miller - 6. Democracy and the limits of punishment: a preface to prisoners'.

Professor Tonry has written a number of books including Between Prison and Probation (with Norval Morris; OUP 1991) . Has the Prison a Future?, in The Future of Imprisonment (Michael Tonry, e. Oxford University Press, 2004).

Professor Tonry has written a number of books including Between Prison and Probation (with Norval Morris; OUP 1991), Malign Neglect (OUP 1995), Sentencing Matters (OUP 1996), Thinking About Crime (OUP 2004), Punishment and Politics-Evidence and Emulation in the Making of English Penal Policy (Willan 2004), Punishing Race (OUP 2011), an.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. 7 Mb. Ideology, Crime and Criminal Justice (Cambridge Criminal Justice Series). Anthony Bottoms, Michael Tonry. 6 Mb. Reform and Punishment (Cambridge Criminal Justice Series). Sue Rex, Michael Tonry. 1 Mb. Sentencing Reform in Overcrowded Times: A Comparative Perspective. Michael Tonry, Kathleen Hatlestad.

Michael H. Tonry, an American criminologist, is the McKnight Presidential Professor of Criminal Law and Policy at the University of Minnesota Law School. He is also the director of the University of Minnesota's Institute on Crime and Public Policy. He has been a visiting professor of law and criminology at the University of Lausanne since 2001 and a senior fellow at the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement at Free University Amsterdam since 2003.

The imprisonment rate in America has grown by a factor of five since 1972. In that time, punishment policies have toughened, compassion for prisoners has diminished, and prisons have gotten worse-a stark contrast to the origins of the prison 200 years ago as a humanitarian reform, a substitute for capital and corporal punishment and banishment. So what went wrong? How can prisons be made simultaneously more effective and more humane? Who should be sent there in the first place? What should happen to them while they are inside? When, how, and under what conditions should they be released? The Future of Imprisonment unites some of the leading prisons and penal policy scholars of our time to address these fundamental questions. Inspired by the work of Norval Morris, the contributors look back to the past twenty-five years of penal policy in an effort to look forward to the prison's twenty-first century future. Their essays examine the effects of current high levels of imprisonment on urban neighborhoods and the people who live in them. They reveal how current policies came to be as they are and explain the theories of punishment that guide imprisonment decisions. Finally, the contributors argue for the strategic importance of controls on punishment including imprisonment as a limit on government power; chart the rise and fall of efforts to improve conditions inside; analyze the theory and practice of prison release; and evaluate the tricky science of predicting and preventing recidivism. A definitive guide to imprisonment policies for the future, this volume convincingly demonstrates how we can prevent crime more effectively at lower economic and human cost.