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eBook Africa Works: Disorder as Political Instrument (African Issues) download

by Patrick Chabal

eBook Africa Works: Disorder as Political Instrument (African Issues) download ISBN: 0253212871
Author: Patrick Chabal
Publisher: Indiana University Press (January 22, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1515 kb
Fb2: 1181 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mbr rtf lrf docx
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

has been added to your Cart. Patrick Chabal is Professor of Lusophone African Studies at King's College, London.

has been added to your Cart. Series: African Issues.

By Patrick Chabal and Jean-Pascal Daloz. Why have most African countries failed to develop, despite more than a decade of economic and political reforms tied to new aid infusions? Because, say Chabal and Daloz, the continent's informal but durable and culturally rooted "neopatrimonial" political systems do not depend on development in the Western sense - and may even be threatened by it.

Sep 09, 2007 Marissa Lemargie rated it really liked it.

118+ million publications. Discover more publications, questions and projects in Africa.

Bibliografische gegevens. Patrick Chabal, Jean-Pascal Daloz. International African Institute. James Currey Publishers, 1999. 0852558147, 9780852558140.

How do political systems in Africa work? Is the "real" business of politics taking place outside the scope of. .

How do political systems in Africa work? Is the "real" business of politics taking place outside the scope of standard political analysis, in an "informal" or more personalised setting? How are the prospects for reform and renewal in African societies affected by the emerging elites? Is "modernisation" in Africa different? Are there within African countries social, political and cultural factors which aspire to the continuation of patrimony and conspire against economic development?Relations of power between rulers and the ruled continue to inform the role of the.

Patrick Chabal; Jean-Pascal Daloz. Is "modernisation" in Africa different? Are there within African countries social, political and cultural factors which aspire to the continuation of patrimony and conspire against economic development?

Patrick Chabal; Jean-Pascal Daloz.

How do political systems in Africa work? Is the real business of politics taking .

book by Jean-Pascal Daloz .

Additional Product Features. Jean-Pascal Daloz, Patrick Chabal. Place of Publication.

item 6 Africa Works - 9780852558140 -Africa Works - 9780852558140. Additional Product Features.

The African e-Journals Project has digitized full text of articles of eleven social science and humanities journals. This item is from the digital archive maintained by Michigan State University Library. Patrick Ghabal and Jean-Pascal Daloz have combined to produce a thoughtprovoking analysis of the problem of development in Africa, a continent which they describe as in crisis.

How do political systems in Africa work? Is the "real" business of politics taking place outside the scope of standard political analysis, in an "informal" or more personalised setting? How are the prospects for reform and renewal in African societies affected by the emerging elites? Is "modernisation" in Africa different? Are there within African countries social, political and cultural factors which aspire to the continuation of patrimony and conspire against economic development?

Relations of power between rulers and the ruled continue to inform the role of the state and the expectations of the newly emphasized civil society. The question of identity, the resurgence of ethnicity and its attendant "tribal" politics, the growing importance of African religions and the increasing resort to extreme and often ritualised violence in situations of civil disorder, point to a process of "re-traditionalising" in African societies

African Issues, edited by Alex de WaalFebruary 1999 192 pp 5 ½ x 8 ½ Index

Comments: (6)
Hallolan
Overall good communication, good value, good customer service! Worth your money, and it is a good investment. I would recommend
Rindyt
This book lays out the realpolitik of African politics, and shows an uncanny understanding of the "problems" of African development.
Globus
The authors of "Africa Works" pose a series of challenges to the existing Western orthodoxy about African politics and government. What if Africa is headed neither toward anarchy nor Western-style modernity, but toward its own unique brand of the future? What if politics is envisioned in a fundamentally different manner in Africa than in the West? What if African political elites were not being manipulated by international institutions, but were in fact doing the manipulating themselves?
In asking these questions, Chabal and Daloz force the reader to reexamine his or her view of Africa and its place in history. They require that Africans no longer be looked at as perpetual victims in the patterns of world events, but as agents in their own destinies. They suggest that African elites have actually engineered the present state of disorder on the continent and do everything in their power to preserve it, and they explain why it is in these elites' interest to do so.
I find their arguments intriguing to say the least, and a refreshing change from the stale, politically correct views that always cast Africa as a helpless pawn of outside powers. "Africa Works" resonates very strongly with my own experience living and working in Africa.
Having said that, though, I am not entirely convinced that the authors are 100 percent on target. They tend to paint developments across the continent with very broad strokes, and offer little in the way of evidence that isn't anecdotal. Furthermore, perhaps their break from the orthodoxy on African politics isn't as significant as they make it out to be. Jean-Francois Bayart, one author whom they repeatedly go out of their way to beat up on, has written articles sounding similar themes.
"Africa Works" is nonetheless an important book and I hope that it touches off a new debate on the character of governance in Africa. The old ideas have clearly done nobody any good.
Nenayally
I was born in and grew up in central Africa and have recently returned to work there - Malawi. Africa is the most extraordinary place - very easy to fall in love with. But, there are some huge buts... In Africa, you will learn the true meaning of the word 'frustration'. It is a place of astounding unrealised potential. Why?
This book is the first cogent explanation of why Africa is like it is, and will form the basis of my own analysis - the one you have to do to remain sane. It is right on the button with explanations for the corruption and disorder that is Africa. And yet it is not a critical book; nor is it patronising and it does not suggest that the answer to African problems is to be more like the West. It simply gives you clues as to why it is like it is.
This book has given me the ammunition I need to convince myself that there is a great deal of sense in what is happening in central Africa. It sounds silly to suggest that a sociological/development studies book could give an otherwise normal person a real insight into his situation, but it does! I really take my hat off to these guys!
Granirad
i have lived and worked in africa for a long time and am emotionally attached to east africa, but this does not cloud my perception of the deep troubles that this continent is in and expect what is realistic instead of what is desirable.
this analysis is done in a unbiased tone, although any proud african will disagree on this. but then proud africans are very touchy when it comes to explaining the miserable reality of most african countries.
the authors put forward that development the western style cannot work in africa, as the basis of a civil society like we know it is simply not there. most frustrating is the fact that there seems to be no proof of an african way to create sustained and stable wealth. if you expect the worst and are happy if it turns out to be just a little better you might have the right attitude to work there.
Narder
When I read this book, I was amused by it. To say that the disorder in Africa benefits someone--e.g., via corruption--has been around for some time and is nothing new. To say that this disorder somehow makes the societies "work" is new but illogical. For something to "work" for the continent as a whole it must have positive net benefit. Right now, the disorder in Africa is such that the benefit to those who gain is far less than the loss to those who lose. This is a well-known research result. Africa doesn't work; the disorder results in a net loss to Africa. Why Africans do not do enough to change the institutional and organizational order is an interesting reasearch topic. How one can help Africans do something about this predicament is also an interesting research topic. But to say that the disorder works is illogical.