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eBook America, Russia and the Cold War 1945-2006 download

by Walter LaFeber

eBook America, Russia and the Cold War 1945-2006 download ISBN: 0073534668
Author: Walter LaFeber
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education; 10 edition (November 20, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 496
ePub: 1512 kb
Fb2: 1760 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Walter LaFeber is a product of the Wisconsin University& radical left history department. The uninitiated should read John E. Hayes' "In Denial".

Walter LaFeber is a product of the Wisconsin University& radical left history department. Despite evidence to the contrary, LaFeber foists the guilt of the origins of the Cold War upon the United State& "imperialism" and minimizes Stalin& complicity.

Gibson 1. Walter LaFeber, America, Russia, and the Cold War, 1945-2006 10e, November 20, 2006. Ultimately, LaFeber’s book is highly revelatory because of his use of historical. One of the central themes that occurs throughout Walter LaFeber’s book, America, Russia, and the Cold War, 1945-2006, is how . foreign policy between the Soviet Union and. third world countries are based off of cultural, domestic, and historical misinterpretations. Gibson 3. context to set the scene, the way he draws parallels between different third world countries fight.

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Start by marking America, Russia and the Cold War 1945-2006 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Jan 03, 2017 Laura Charnis rated it it was amazing.

It explores how the Cold War was shaped by domestic events in both the . His books include The American Age: . and the Soviet Union and presents a variety of other points of view on the conflict-Chinese, Latin American, European, and Vietnamese. Walter Lafeber was born and raised in Indiana, attended Hanover College, and then received his Master of Arts degree from Stanford University and his Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

It first came out after the initial wave of Cold War revisionist theories had already. been published and debated, and in the view of Eliot Fremont-Smith of the New York Times, was part of a succeeding wave of books that tried to refine those insights in a firmer historical grounding. Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. The text includes both engaging anecdotes and quotes from primary sources to support key points and exemplify policies, and recent scholarship and materials from openings of the . Soviet, and Chinese archives.

Using extensive materials from both published and private sources, this concise text focuses on United States-Soviet diplomacy to explain the causes and consequences of the Cold War. It explores how the Cold War was shaped by domestic events in both the .

Walter Lafeber was born and raised in Indiana, attended Hanover College, and then received his Master of Arts degree from Stanford University and his Doctor of Philosophy degree from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Foreign Policy at Home and Abroad Since 1750 (2nd e. 1994); Inevitable Revolutions: The United States in Central America (2nd e. 1993); The Panama Canal: The Crisis in Historical Perspective (2nd e. 1989); and The New Empire: An Interpretation of American Expansion, 1865-1898 (1963).

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Using extensive materials from both published and private sources, this concise text focuses on United States-Soviet diplomacy to explain the causes and consequences of the Cold War. It explores how the Cold War was shaped by domestic events in both the U.S. and the Soviet Union and presents a variety of other points of view on the conflict--Chinese, Latin American, European, and Vietnamese. The text includes both engaging anecdotes and quotes from primary sources to support key points and exemplify policies, and recent scholarship and materials from openings of the U.S., Soviet, and Chinese archives.
Comments: (7)
Balhala
I wanted to check a beginner's book on cold war and was VERY disappointed. I don't understand why this book had so many editions, since it's very weak : narration is poor, overtly liberal, America is responsible for the cold war. The whole book looks as it's still in the 70s, with those laughable revisionnist ideas, old maps and cartoons.

One sentence sums up the spirit perfectly : "[The Berlin Wall] was mute and bloody testimony to the policy of both East and West which, since 1945, had preferred a divided rather than a neutralized and united Germany". (p.225) No comment.

The chapters, despite the mention "updated" are not updated at all, Zubok and Pleshakov isn't even mentioned. After reading the first chapters, i throwed it to the can. Gonna check John Gaddis instead. Oh boy, they should put a sticker "liberal orientation" on books to save people's money !
Cemav
As always, it met our expectations.
Moonworm
I started this book with high hopes, as the arena of cold war history holds a particular appeal to me. The problem that Lafeber has in assessing the era is that he continually makes assertions at a maddening pace--hardly a paragraph goes by without it them--when such assertions are extremely debatable, sometimes in very obvious ways, and worse, largely incorrect. Thus, when he explains that Reagan won the election with only 51 percent over Carter, he leaves out the fact that a significant third-party vote kept his opponent to a 10-point loss. It seems strange that such a bar for explaining presidential popularity didn't exist for Clinton, who never won a popular vote, but merely a plurality.

Similarly, the Reagan years are treated as failures, with unequivocal judgements (in Nicaragua and El Salvador, for example) about events there not balanced by the fact that both countries later became better off. You might think that Reagan would be praised for bankrupting the Soviet Union (See numerous references that are available by Soviet Officials who were in a position to know), but somehow this author can't seem to come to grips with that.

If you prefer history that is better based in solid facts or context, you will be best served by looking elsewhere. This book is largely leftist revisionism.
Skillet
I'm reading this book now for a class, and it takes me ages just to get through one chapter. I think it's the nature of the book - it is a brief survey, therefore briefly touches upon things that of course are much deeper. I pretty much have to read this book with Wikipedia open right next to me, because I'm constantly losing my place mentally: "Wait, what is this again? And what is this?" I often won't understand what the author is getting at until I do sufficient background reading and come back to the book afterward.

I think it depends what you want to get out of this book. I'm the type of reader that likes to understand why an author says everything he says, I'm not the type of reader that just wants to get a "general" idea of what's going on. I think that's why I have such a hard time reading a brief survey of an infinitely complex chain of events like the Cold War.

Another thing, I feel the Author doesn't do the best job of explaining what he wants to say. I often feel like he knows what he wants to say, but doesn't do well getting it down in print. Definitely NOT a book I would read on my free time...
MrRipper
Some people just can't admit they were wrong. The author continues to spew the line that it was the Americans who were the imperialists and the communists who were progressives. This is done even now when every nation under the yoke of communism happily dumped it if given a chance and mountains of Russian sources show how evil the USSR was. It's appalling that this is assigned as a text.
Tam
Walter LaFeber is a product of the Wisconsin University`s radical left history department. The uninitiated should read John E. Hayes'
"In Denial". Despite evidence to the contrary, LaFeber foists the guilt of the origins of the Cold War upon the United State`s "imperialism" and minimizes Stalin`s complicity. There are many more unbiased books available on this to read.
lets go baby
This book is an essential addition to any library for anyone interested in knowing the facts of the Cold War. It's breathless in it's rapid-fire espousing of the facts and events that cover the emergence of America as THE true global power of the past seventy five years. This isn't the book to solely own if you want to understand the "whys" and "hows" America adopted rabid religiosity, rampant capitalism, got sucked into Vietnam and became the crucible for cultural change across the globe but it is the bedrock of an understanding not just America of today but also the wider world in which we live. LaFeber pumps out facts at a pace that at times is hard to keep up with but that's because this is indeed a fascinating time of world history. Get the book and hold on for dear life...then be inspired to read other historians to get the complete picture, if you dare; it isn't always pretty reading.