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eBook The Moral Mirror of Roman Art download

by Rabun Taylor

eBook The Moral Mirror of Roman Art download ISBN: 052186612X
Author: Rabun Taylor
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (May 12, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1536 kb
Fb2: 1605 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr lrf rtf azw
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Start by marking The Moral Mirror of Roman Art as Want to Read . Focusing on examples found in mythical narrative, religious devotion, social interaction, and gender relations, Rabun Taylor demonstrates that reflections served as powerful symbols of personal change.

Start by marking The Moral Mirror of Roman Art as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Thus, in both art and literature, a reflection may be present during moments of a protagonist's inner or outer transformation.

Автор: Rabun Taylor Название: The Moral Mirror of Roman Art Издательство: Cambridge Academ .

This interdisciplinary study explores the meanings of mirrors and reflections in Roman art and society

This interdisciplinary study explores the meanings of mirrors and reflections in Roman art and society. Focusing on examples found in mythical narrative, religious devotion, social interaction and gender relations, Rabun Taylor demonstrates that reflections served as powerful symbols of personal change.

Rabun M. Taylor, Rabun Taylor. Cambridge University Press, 12 May 2008 - 274 sayfa. This interdisciplinary study explores the meanings of mirrors and reflections in Roman art and society.

Items related to The Moral Mirror of Roman Ar. Rabun Taylor is Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Texas, Austin.

Items related to The Moral Mirror of Roman Art. Rabun Taylor The Moral Mirror of Roman Art. ISBN 13: 9780521866125. Book Description: This interdisciplinary study explores the meanings of mirrors and reflections in Roman art and society. About the Author: Rabun Taylor is Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Texas, Austin. He received his PhD in Classical Studies from the University of Minnesota and taught at Harvard University prior to his current appointment.

Rabun Taylor is Assistant Professor of Classics at the University of Texas, Austin. His publications include Public Needs and Private Pleasures: Water Distribution, the Tiber River, and the Urban Development of Ancient Rome (2000) and Roman Builders: A Study in Architectural Process (2003).

Rabun Taylor (2008). Art in the Lives of Ordinary Romans: Visual Representation and Non-Elite Viewers in Italy, 100 . The Moral Mirror of Roman Art. Cambridge University Press. 315. University of California Press.

That the ancients found mirrors good to think with has been established by a number of recent publications on aspects of the mirror in antiquity

That the ancients found mirrors good to think with has been established by a number of recent publications on aspects of the mirror in antiquity. In the past thirty years, such scholars as J. Baltrusaitis, S. Melchior- Bonnet, M. Pendergrast. ave published books on (respectively) His study isn’t about metaphors of mirrors, but about mirrors! V. thorough biblio Really art historical study. Translating from jing to mir’āt/ā’īna: medieval Islamic mirrors revisited", Art in Translation: Special Issue on Chinese Art and Translation, 5, no. 2 (2013), pp. 251-72.

The moral mirror of Roman art. Rabun Taylor. 1. The teaching mirror 2. Mirrors mortal and morbid: Narcissus and Hermaphroditus 3. DionysiusPerseus. Break the silence: prevent sexual exploitation and abuse in and around schools in Africa. George W. Houston, Sebastian Conrad.

This interdisciplinary study explores the meanings of mirrors and reflections in Roman art and society. When used as metaphors in Roman visual and literary discourses, mirrors had a strongly moral force, reflecting not random reality but rather a carefully filtered imagery with a didactic message. Focusing on examples found in mythical narrative, religious devotion, social interaction, and gender relations, Rabun Taylor demonstrates that reflections served as powerful symbols of personal change. Thus, in both art and literature, a reflection may be present during moments of a protagonist's inner or outer transformation.