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eBook Public Address and Moral Judgment: Critical Studies in Ethical Tensions (Rhetoric Public Affairs) download

by Shawn J. Parry-Giles,Assistant Professor Trevor Parry-Giles

eBook Public Address and Moral Judgment: Critical Studies in Ethical Tensions (Rhetoric  Public Affairs) download ISBN: 0870138685
Author: Shawn J. Parry-Giles,Assistant Professor Trevor Parry-Giles
Publisher: Michigan State University Press (December 1, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 259
ePub: 1381 kb
Fb2: 1618 kb
Rating: 4.4
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Subcategory: Humanities

The essays in Public Address and Moral Judgment, on topics ranging from WWII propaganda to the civil rights rhetoric of President George H. W. Bush to the photographs from the Abu Ghraib . Shawn J. Parry-Giles. Books by Shawn J.

The essays in Public Address and Moral Judgment, on topics ranging from WWII propaganda to the civil rights rhetoric of President George H. Bush to the photographs from the Abu Ghraib prison, consider the powerful role of public discourse in the constitution of a moral code for the American people.

Shawn J. Parry-Giles is Professor of Communication and Director of the Center for Political communication and Civic . Parry-Giles is Professor of Communication and Director of the Center for Political communication and Civic Leadership at the University of Maryland. She is the author of The Rhetorical Presidency, Propaganda, and the Cold War, 1945-1955 (2001) and co-author of Constructing Clinton: Hyper-Reality and Presidential Image-Making in Postmodern Politics (2002) and The Prime-Time Presidency: The West Wing and US Nationalism (2006).

In Public Address and Moral Judgement: Critical Studies in Ethical Tensions, ed. by Shawn J. Parry-Giles, and Trevor Parry-Giles, 97-125. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press. Kennedy's rhetoric was a skillful reaction to his immediate rhetorical and political obstacles, but it illustrates the generic limitations of the American jeremiad as a vehicle for social criticism.

Inroduction: Ethical and moral judgment and the power of public address, Shawn J. Parry-Giles, Trevor Parry-Giles Where is. .Personal Name: Parry-Giles, Trevor, 1963-. Uniform Title: Rhetoric and public affairs series. Parry-Giles, Trevor Parry-Giles Where is public address? : George W. Bush, Abu Ghraib, and contemporary moral discourse, Celeste Michelle Condit George H. Bush and the strange disappearance of groups from civil rights talk, Vanessa B. Beasley Public moral argument on same-sex marriage, 2000-2005 : a narrative approach, Martin J. Medhurst Time, space, and generic reconstitution : Martin Luther King's "A time to break silence" as radical jeremiad, James Jasinski .

Follow Trevor Parry-Giles and explore their bibliography from .

com's Trevor Parry-Giles Author Page. Trevor Parry-Giles is a professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Maryland and the Executive Director at the National Communication Association. Dr Parry-Giles has appeared in two documentary films and on the NBC Nightly News, the BBC, China Central Television, Maryland Public Television, and C-SPAN's Washington Journal. He's been quoted by the New York Times, the Washington Post, USA Today, The London Times, Politico, and the Wall Street Journal, among others. Customers Also Bought Items By.

Public Address and Moral Judgment offers a critical look at the ways in which public address can enact moral codes, articulate moral judgments, and manifest ethical tensions. Each chapter carefully examines specific examples of public address for their moral dimensions, exploring how public address functions to articulate and express the ethical tensions of its time and context

Authors: Shawn J Parry-Giles Trevor Parry-Giles

Authors: Shawn J Parry-Giles Trevor Parry-Giles. Â Â Â The essays in Public Address and Moral Judgment, on topics ranging from WWII propaganda to the civil rights rhetoric of President George H. Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee.

In Parry-Giles, Shawn J. and Parry-Giles, Trevor (ed., Public address and moral judgment: Critical studies in ethical tensions. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, pp. 1-29. USA: State University of New York Press. Condit, C. M. (1987). Crafting virtue: The rhetorical construction of public morality. Quarterly Journal of Speech, 73(1), 79-97. Cragan, J. F. and Shields, D. C. (1998). Understanding communication theory: Communicative forces in action. Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Fairclough, N. (2001). In R. Wodak and M. Meyer, (Ed.

In Public address and moral judgment: Critical studies in ethical . The politics of sincerity: Plato, frank speech, and democratic judgment. Composition: A course in writing and rhetoric. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

In Public address and moral judgment: Critical studies in ethical tensions, ed. S. Parry-Giles and T. Parry-Giles, 97–126. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press. Archetypal metaphor in rhetoric: The light-dark family. Quarterly Journal of Speech 53 (2): 115–126. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Public Address and Moral Judgment offers a critical look at the ways in which public address can enact moral c. ISBN10 : IND:30000124599808, ISBN13 : Page Number : 259. Read Online Download Full. The Handbook Of Rhetoric And Public Address. John Wiley & Sons. The Handbook of Rhetoric and Public Address is a state-of-the-art companion to the field that showcases both t. ISBN10 : 9781405178136, ISBN13 : 1405178132.

Public Address and Moral Judgment offers a critical look at the ways in which public address can enact moral codes, articulate moral judgments, and manifest ethical tensions. Each chapter carefully examines specific examples of public address for their moral dimensions, exploring how public address functions to articulate and express the ethical tensions of its time and context. The contributors highlight important and often different ways that public address works to expose problematics in ethical tensions―problematics of language and imagery, metaphor and character, genre and definition. The authors are also mindful of the tenuous relationship that exists between rhetoric and morality, between situated public address and a society's ethical foundations.      The essays in Public Address and Moral Judgment, on topics ranging from WWII propaganda to the civil rights rhetoric of President George H. W. Bush to the photographs from the Abu Ghraib prison, consider the powerful role of public discourse in the constitution of a moral code for the American people.

Comments: (2)
Thomand
This is the latest in the publisher's Rhetoric and Public Affairs Series, now some thirty works. This one collects articles mostly by academics in the field of communications; as do others which are not by individual or coauthors. "The essays in this volume reveal..how situated public address figures in the crafting of public morality and how such crafting is difficult, tenuous, and often confusing." Analyzing particular situations, public speakers, and their words and rhetoric, the authors "point to the range of problematics that attend to the investigation of public morality as expressed rhetorically, from tensions about language and narrative to concerns about gender, ideology, and visuality."

The editors note that "much of public moral argument in the United States occurs within contexts of war or in situations where advocates compete over the extension or restriction of civil rights." Accordingly the essays treat key statements relating to U.S. preparation for or engagement in war and civil rights issues and struggles. Given this framework set by the editors, it is not surprising that President George Bush, Martin Luther King, and Abraham Lincoln are figures whose words are analyzed for the moral position reflected in them.

Such leaders' pronouncements and speeches to the public are rarely explicitly moralistic, but rather are meant to persuade the public to embrace or affirm a moral position. Bush, Lincoln, and such are not preachers, but leaders trying to unite or sustain public opinion in some enterprise. As in most calls for action or support (as opposed to military directives for example), moral sentiments and beliefs are inherent in the origins, delivery (i. e., rhetoric), and influence of public words.

Contrasting Lincoln's viewpoint toward war and foes with Bush's in the article "Bush, Abu Ghraib, and Moral Discourse" exemplifies how differing moral points of view are reflected by different political leaders and implies differing courses of action relating to these. In Lincoln's words about the Civil War the country was engaged in and the opposing Confederate forces, "Lincoln eschewed a harsh, dichotomizing style, and instead employed pentadic ratios and a style that wove agents, scenes, and temporal domains together. In contrast, by placing Bush as the central agent of a battle in which the opposition was pure evil, Bush's rhetorical strategy...made it impossible to condemn any actions of the United States without thereby lauding or absolving the enemy." Differences in such moral outlooks result in differences in policies and actions which have effects. Lincoln talked about and worked toward "binding the nation's wounds." Bush, by contrast, was fully committed to annihilating an ill-defined, elusive enemy. Such differences are not accounted for entirely by differences in "situation".

The articles mostly concern major public issues from World War II and after. Government patriotic and propagandistic activities during the War are treated, as is Martin Luther King's leadership in the civil-rights struggles. Many readers will be most interested in the complete chapters and parts of chapters on issues relating to the war in Iraq; which issues also relate to Afghanistan.

Scholarly analyses on public subjects and topics of modern-day and contemporary concern, the collected essays are a particularly relevant, informative, and insightful type of media study.
Foxanayn
I used this book as the primary text for my class on Critical Public Address, supplemented with selections from Landmark Essays on American Public Address edited by Martin J. Medhurst, to show practical critical analysis of speeches, focusing on a variety of audiences and purposes. Not only was the analysis of public speaking interesting given the variety of speech instances covered, but the book also served as a platform for a meta-critique of how academics evaluate public address. The book's topics served as models for instances in the public sphere that had a particular rhetorical component to it, including the event itself (including background information as needed), the context in which it happened, and the public response to it.