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eBook Why the Allies Won download

by Richard Overy

eBook Why the Allies Won download ISBN: 0393039250
Author: Richard Overy
Publisher: W W Norton & Co Inc; 1 edition (April 1, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 396
ePub: 1612 kb
Fb2: 1459 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Richard Overy is Professor of History at the University of Exeter. He is the author of many books on the Second World War and the Third Reich including Russia’s War (1998), The Battle of Britain (2000) and Interrogations: The Nazi Elite in Allied Hands, 1945 (2001)

Richard Overy is Professor of History at the University of Exeter. He is the author of many books on the Second World War and the Third Reich including Russia’s War (1998), The Battle of Britain (2000) and Interrogations: The Nazi Elite in Allied Hands, 1945 (2001). His latest book The Dictators: Hitler’s Germany, Stalin’s Russia (2004) was joint winner of the Wolfson Prize and the Hessel-Tiltman Prize in 2005. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of King’s College, where he taught for twenty-five years. He is currently writing a book on inter-war cultures of decline.

As someone who felt like I already knew a decent amount about WWII, my view of this most important conflict in the modern world was significantly and surprisingly changed

Why the Allies Won is a rarity among history books: difficult to simplify and a pleasure to read, it says many interesting things about a familiar topic without lapsing into banality or sophistry.

Why the Allies Won is a rarity among history books: difficult to simplify and a pleasure to read, it says many interesting things about a familiar topic without lapsing into banality or sophistry. To the question underlying the title of his book, Richard Overy, a professor of modern history at King’s College, London, offers many answers, some broad, others specific, all solidly grounded yet none alone sufficient to explain the outcome of World War II. Overy takes for a starting point the view that much of what we believe about the war is illusion.

Why the Allies Won book. Richard Overy's bold book begins by throwing out the stock answers to this great question: Germany doomed itself to defeat by fighting a two-front war; the Allies won by "sheer weight of material strength. In fact, by 1942 Germany controlled almost the entire resources of continental Europe and was poised to move into the Middle East.

Richard Overy's bold book begins by throwing out the stock answers to this great question: Germany doomed itself to defeat by fighting a two-front war; the Allies won by "sheer weight of material strength. The Soviet Union had lost the heart of its industry, and the United States was not yet armed. The Allied victory in 1945 was not inevitable. Overy shows us exactly how the Allies regained military superiority and why they were able to do it.

Today the modern world is once more in the throes of painful transformation

Overy also analyzes the superior control of resources by the Allies, the combat effectiveness of Allied and . A cogent look at the 20th century's great turning point.

Overy also analyzes the superior control of resources by the Allies, the combat effectiveness of Allied and Axis troops, the leadership of the two sides, and the moral contrasts between them. He concludes that & Allies won. because they turned their economic strength into effective fighting power, and turned the moral energies of their people into an effective will to wi. ' A cogent look at the 20th century's great turning point. Book-of-the-Month Club selection; History Book Club main selection).

I believe Richard Overy chose an excellent way to write this book.

Richard Overy is Professor in History at the University of Exeter. Formerly Professor of Modern History at King's College, London, his books include William Morris, Viscount Nuffield The Air War, 1939-1945 Dictators, The Dictators- Hitler's Germany, Stalin's Russia, The Nazi Economic Recovery, 1932-1938, Goering- The Iron Man All Our Working Lives (with Peter Pagnamenta), The Origins Of The Second World War, The Road To War (with Andrew.

Explanations for why the Allied forces were able to prevail over Germany, Italy, and Japan during World War II in campaigns at sea, the eastern front, the air war, and the "amphibious" assault on Europe.
Comments: (7)
Todal
Richard Overy's answer to why the allies won WWII is history at its best, not just a loose collection of details in chronological order, but a solid facts based analysis designed to answer a question of value and importance. As someone who felt like I already knew a decent amount about WWII, my view of this most important conflict in the modern world was significantly and surprisingly changed.

In a world that seems starving for silver bullet, quick answers to problems Richard Overy's in depth analysis instead paradoxically delivers believability in equal proportion with a lack of any clarifying simplicity. He divides his book into two general sections, the first half on the most decisive battles of the war, and the second half exploring the underlying factors that translated into fighting ability for all the major combatants.

The battles include the fight for control of the seas, which includes both Midway in the Pacific and the U-boat war in the Atlantic, the related battles of Kursk and Stalingrad, the bomber war in the skies over Germany, and the D-Day invasion of France. All of these battles were neccessary taken together in turning the tide from initial Axis victories to eventual Allied success. The amazing thing that Overy points out is how bitterly fought, closely contested, and just how razor thin the margins of victory were for the allied forces in each of these clashes. The Atlantic war was won only when a handful of long range patrol bombers that could close the Atlantic Gap became operational, and only then could supplies reach Britain to start the offensive in the West. Midway was won with just ten bombs out of hundreds dropped actually hitting their targets. The mere addition of drop tanks to allied fighters finally allowed them to fight and eliminate the Luftwaffe, and allowed the huge Allied bombing effort to finally work as envisaged. The drawdown of Luftwaffe power from the East to fight the bombers, and the miraculous regeneration of the Red Army contributed decisively to Stalingrad and Kursk. What he makes clear in this section is that World War II was not just a competition of steel production or factory line efficiency between the powers writ large on a Titanic scale, but a brutal, bloody slugging match, with small operational details well within the abilities of any of the combatants forging the difference between victory and defeat in the field.

The second half of the book is dedicated to the behind the front line factors that contribute to wars, including economic strength, technological prowess, national leadership ability and coalition unity, and morality and the will to fight. This was some of the best investigating in the book, with vivid and revealing comparisons between the Axis and Allies. Although the operational battles were where the actual victory of the war was secured, these behind the scene factors were what stacked the deck in favor of the Allies. Overy shows convincingly that based on the ability to field and fight large militaries WWII was mostly between Germany on one side, and The Soviet Union and the United States on the other. The extreme inferiority of Japanese and Italian industry made them actors playing in the wake of German fortunes only, and while Britain's contributions were more significant than the Japanese or Italians they too paled relative to the three prime players.

There are many striking themes in this second section. The failure of Nazi Germany in turning its vast technological and economic potential, -and the resources of its conquered territories- into an efficient military-industrial complex. The centralized use of terror, hatred, and superhuman effort that saved Soviet Industry from the Nazi onslaught, and then rebuilt it greater than before, contrasted to the capitalist, incentive based American industrial economy that sought companies to volunteer to mass manufacture what they thought they best could. The operational flexibility of the Allied forces wrought from disastrous early forays in battle, versus the ossified operational rigidity of the Axis stemming from too much early success. The central role that will and morality played in the ultimate defeat of the Axis. The ability of Allied nations as ideologically and culturally opposite to each other as the Soviet Union and US/UK to combine in the face of a common enemy, where Italy was mostly a diversionary drain on German power and cooperation with Japan was effectively non-existent.

Richard Overy makes some amazing conclusions. WWII's largest theater by far was between the Soviets and the Germans, with the blood of 20 million Soviets ultimately paying the price for destruction of the Nazis, and the contributions of the US and other allies, while key, were small in comparison. WWII merely saved democracy, but it made the world safe for communism instead as where the bulk of the fighting took place (i.e. Eastern Europe and China) became communist at the end of the war. The degree to which post war liberal western power and comfort were the result of Soviet brutality, depredation and death on an untold scale is unsettling to say the least.

So why did the Allies win? You'll have to -and definitely should- read the book to get the full answer, but the short answer is that miraculously every element of the allied war effort worked better than the axis effort. Without this the unconditional surrender of the fascist states could never have been brought about. His last chapter, with great insights on the centrality of will and morality on the outcome of the war, is one of the best pieces of war writing I have ever read and has the most import for our current war. It makes for a fitting capstone to a great book.

Perhaps the most striking fact of the whole book is how much Allied victory was not pre-ordained by national factors such as manpower and industrial might. No less a figure than Wintson Churchill himself attributed Allied victory to providence alone.
invincible
This book is a jewel. Mr. Overy was able to thoroughly explain why the Allies won. The reasons are manifold; we can point out some of them.
- Hitler's one man show at the helm of the German Armed Forces proved to be disastrous. His approach was amateurish and he was just not competent enough for the momentous task at hand.
- The German Armed Forces fastidious insistence on weapons that were finished with a high grade of precision impeded the mass production of standardized weapons that could match the weapon's output of the Allies.
- Japan's industrial production and supply system could not match America's.
- The Axis powers lacked sufficient oil and its derivates.
- Allied Armed Forces were able to learn from their mistakes and made the necessary adjustments to match the Axis powers' proficiency at the art of war, conversely, Germany's and Japan's Armed Forces did not improve their performance apreciably after their initial successes.
- The Allies had the "moral high ground" which spurred them on to victory.
- The Allies were successful at curbing the effectiveness of the German U-boats.
- The Allies were able to wear down the Luftwaffe and thus achieve air superiority.
- The Allies were able to keep the Germans guessing where the invasion force would land on continental Europe.
- The Germans never mechanized their supply lines and their troop transport the way the Allies did.
Mr. Overy is a word-Meister; he writes with clarity and elegance. It was a pleasure to read this book.
Mora
The author, Richard Overy, is one of the world's leading scholars about WW2. In this book, Overy systematizes his thesis about the factors that lead to the outcome of WW2.

First, he elaborates on the decisive campaigns of WW2: The submarine battles on the Atlantic, the Air War over the Reich, the gigantic defensive battles in the Eastern Front in 1942 and 1943 (of course!), and the opening of the Western Front in 1944. In these chapters he elaborates on the basic factors that lead to Allied victory.

The defensive battles of Kursk and Stalingrad were perhaps the most decisive battles in the war because in these battles huge losses were inflicted on the Germans and they denied victory in the Eastern front, with meant that the Germans couldn't take their army out of Russia to deal with other potential enemies, making the invasion of France feasible in the first place. The air war was also decisive because of the resources that were denied to Germany in the form of increased war production, the losses in fighters defending the Reich, the potential losses of bombers that could have been made instead of fighters to defend the Reich, the ammunition expenditures and the firepower and manpower allocated to the defense of the Reich that could have been allocated to the Eastern front, for example.

Second, he elaborates on the general characteristics of the economic, morale and political factors of the war. For example, he argues that the Allies utilized their resources more efficiently than the Germans, with was why they obtained their material superiority in the first place. But this argument has some problems, first, Germany didn't have access to much needed natural resources to manufacture weapons, second, her conquered empire on continental Europe doesn't mean a proportional increase in warmaking capacity, since foreign occupied lands aren't the same to domestic lands, so their military conquest didn't mean much in economic terms in the short term at least (before this pan-European empire could be consolidated).

Then, he elaborates on his synthesis explanation, noting first that Germany was the major Axis power and that her defeat would seal the fate of her weaker allies. And he focuses on the importance of the Eastern front in breaking the back of the German army and on the air war in destroying the Luftwaffe.