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by Mario Caciagli,David I Kertzer,EDITOR *

eBook Italian Politics: The Contested Transition (Italian Politics : A Review, Vol 11) download ISBN: 0813331870
Author: Mario Caciagli,David I Kertzer,EDITOR *
Publisher: Westview Press; 1 edition (September 12, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1863 kb
Fb2: 1108 kb
Rating: 4.6
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Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Italian Politics : The Contested Transition. by Mario Caciagli and David I. Kertzer. Another year of political drama unfolded in Italy in 1995, as the struggle to create a Second Republic, which had gathered momentum in the previous three years, bogged down.

Italian Politics : The Contested Transition. Select Format: Paperback.

Italian Politics book.

Mario Caciagli, David I Kertzer. Westview Press, 12 сент. The volume contains two invaluable reference sections: a full chronology of the political events of the year and an appendix providing a wealth of statistical data on Italian election results, political parties, and the economy.

Series: Italian Politics. Hardcover: 288 pages.

Home Browse Books Book details, Italian Politics: The Stalled Transition. By Mario Caciagli, David I. Kertser. Italian Politics: The Stalled Transition. The 2014 Elections in Italy for the European Parliament: An Italian Affair? By Soare, Sorina Studia Politica, Vol. 14, No. 3, 2014.

The Stalled Transition. Since 1986, Italian Politics has described and analyzed the main political and social events of the previous year. Mario Caciagli and David I. Published by: Berghahn Books. Submissions Journal Home Page. It combines systematic archival work with analysis of changes in both public sector policies and political institutions. Each volume includes a listing of the main political events of the year as well as information on the most recent elections, party politics, and public policies.

Kertzer is the author of numerous books and articles on politics and culture, European social history, anthropological demography, 19th-century Italian social history, contemporary Italian society and politics.

Kertzer is the author of numerous books and articles on politics and culture, European social history, anthropological demography, 19th-century Italian social history, contemporary Italian society and politics, and the history of Vatican relations with the Jews and the Italian state. His book, The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara, was a finalist for the National Book Award in Nonfiction in 1997.

Testing Italian democracy. Comparative European Politics, Vol. 11, Issue. Sandri, Giulia Telò, Mario and Tomini, Luca 2013. Political system, civil society and institutions in Italy: The quality of democracy.

The politics of Italy are conducted through a parliamentary republic with a. .

The politics of Italy are conducted through a parliamentary republic with a multi-party system. The previous Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti is 70, his predecessor Silvio Berlusconi was 75 at the time of resignation (2011), the previous head of the government Romano Prodi was 70 when he stepped down (2008), the Italian President Giorgio Napolitano is 88 and his predecessor Carlo Azeglio Ciampi was 86.

Roberto D'Alimonte, David Nelkin, Professor David Nelken. The year 1996 in Italian politics was a year rich in novelty. After the stalled transition of 1995, the political atmosphere had begun to change. Most obvious was the end of Dinis unelected government of technocrats, supported by a heterogeneous group in Parliament, and its replacement with Romano Prodis government, a coalition of the parties that had won the general election on April 21, 1996.

Another year of political drama unfolded in Italy in 1995, as the struggle to create a Second Republic, which had gathered momentum in the previous three years, bogged down. The Berlusconi government put in place by the first parliamentary elections held under the new process fell victim to interparty squabbling that seemed remarkably similar to discord in the reviled system of old. In the absence of a political majority, the country was ruled by a government of “technicians” who were neither members of parliament nor representatives of the parties.In this volume, experts examine political developments in Italy throughout 1995, explaining what did or did not change and shedding light on a series of dramatic conflicts. After an introduction assessing the political developments of the year, the discussions take up such issues as regional and local elections and national referenda, the evolution of the former Communist Party, the difficulties faced by Berlusconi in creating a stable party organization, the failure of the former Christian Democratic party and how the Church has responded to its fall, the successes and failures of the Dini government, attempts to reform Italy's costly pension system, difficulties faced by Italy in entering the European Monetary Union, the crisis in the judiciary and tensions over the judicial handling of Tangentopoli, and the comeback of the national labor confederations. The volume contains two invaluable reference sections: a full chronology of the political events of the year and an appendix providing a wealth of statistical data on Italian election results, political parties, and the economy.