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eBook Devolution and the governance of Northern Ireland (Devolution Series MUP) download

by Colin Knox

eBook Devolution and the governance of Northern Ireland (Devolution Series MUP) download ISBN: 0719074363
Author: Colin Knox
Publisher: Manchester University Press; 1 edition (November 18, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1958 kb
Fb2: 1854 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr mobi lrf lrf
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

These changes in turn are shown to underpin increased desire among elite policymakers in the devolved regions of Scotland and Northern Ireland to develop distinctive approaches to social security.

Manchester University Press, 2010. Knox, CG 2010, Devolution and the Governance of Northern Ireland. Manchester University Press. Knox CG. Devolution and the Governance of Northern Ireland. Manchester University Press, 2010. 310 p. Knox, Colin Gerard. Manchester University Press, 2010

For years, Northern Ireland has been the subject of academic enquiry relating to political, constitutional, and security issues. Now, as a post-conflict society, political parties which for years engaged in the politics of antagonism must now redirect their efforts to delivering public policies that will improve the quality of people’s daily lives. This has not come easily to them.

In Northern Ireland, devolution was a key part of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement supported .

In Northern Ireland, devolution was a key part of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement supported by voters in a referendum in May 1998. Following this public endorsement, the UK Parliament passed three devolution Acts: the Scotland Act 1998, the Northern Ireland Act 1998, and the Government of Wales Act 1998 (which was later effectively superseded by the Government of Wales Act 2006). The Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the UK government and the devolved administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland was first agreed in 2001 and most recently updated in October 2013.

Colin Knox is Professor of Comparative Public Policy in the School of Criminology, Politics and Social Policy at the University of Ulster.

In the United Kingdom, devolution (Scottish Gaelic: fèin-riaghlaidh, Welsh: datganoli; Irish: Dílárú) is the statutory granting of powers from the Parliament of the United Kingdom to the Scottish Parliament, the National Assembly for Wales, the North.

In the United Kingdom, devolution (Scottish Gaelic: fèin-riaghlaidh, Welsh: datganoli; Irish: Dílárú) is the statutory granting of powers from the Parliament of the United Kingdom to the Scottish Parliament, the National Assembly for Wales, the Northern Ireland Assembly and the London Assembly and to their associated executive bodies the Scottish Government, the Welsh Government, the Northern Ireland Executive and in England, the Greater London Authority and combined authorities.

Published online by Cambridge University Press: 20 September 2011.

This study marshals evidence from Northern Ireland’s relationship with the .

This study marshals evidence from Northern Ireland’s relationship with the European Union (EU) during the contemporary era of devolved power. The text argues that in Northern Ireland a series of national and regional constraints, complexities and divisions limit regional autonomy. These original insights question the synergy between devolution and the EU and query the existence of new forms of ‘governance’. This is a contribution of both immense substance and considerable importance and should be essential reading for those with an interest in Northern Ireland and EU politics. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. How do I upload a book?

Devolution is the statutory delegation of powers from the central government of a sovereign state to govern at a subnational level, such as a regional or local level. It is a form of administrative decentralization.

Devolution is the statutory delegation of powers from the central government of a sovereign state to govern at a subnational level, such as a regional or local level. Devolved territories have the power to make legislation relevant to the area and thus granting them a higher level of autonomy

The Government of the Northwest Territories, the Aboriginal Summit and the Government of Canada have each appointed a Chief Negotiator to work on devolution. A Framework Agreement was concluded in 2004.

The Government of the Northwest Territories, the Aboriginal Summit and the Government of Canada have each appointed a Chief Negotiator to work on devolution. The target date for the completion of devolution talks for the NWT was March 2007. However, stumbling blocks associated with the transfer of current federal employees to the territorial government, and the unresolved issue of how much money the Northwest Territories will receive for its resources has delayed the conclusion of a devolution agreement for the NWT. Nunavut.

This book offers the first account of what the First Minister, Peter Robinson, describes as the most settled period of devolution in Northern Ireland for almost forty years. It traces the tortuous path to devolved government, the political instability which constantly threatened the institutions, and since May 2007 the bedding down of devolution and its impact so far on the people of Northern Ireland. The book parallels accounts of devolved government in Scotland and Wales. For years Northern Ireland has been the subject of academic enquiry relating to political, constitutional and security issues. Now as a post-conflict society political parties which for years engaged in the politics of antagonism must now redirect their efforts to delivering public policies that will improve the quality of people's daily lives. This has not come easily to them. This book is therefore the first study which looks at devolved power sharing governance arrangements in Northern Ireland and a sequel to Derek Birrell's book Direct Rule and the Governance of Northern Ireland. Manchester: Manchester University Press (2009) The book contains chapters on the key governance institutions: the civil service, local government, non-departmental public bodies, and the vibrant third sector in Northern Ireland. It examines in some detail the major review of public administration ongoing since 2002 and the more recent public services modernising agenda. Importantly, given the sectarian divisions which have segregated every aspect of life in Northern Ireland, the book asks the key question whether it is possible to reconcile the two communities or are they destined to live 'separate but equal' lives. Finally, the book considers topical issues which are at the early stages of implementation: community planning and central-local relations. This book will be of interest to students of devolution across the UK and beyond. It will also be relevant for those researchers working in the area of post-conflict societies.