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by Lewis White Beck,Immanuel Kant

eBook Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals download ISBN: 0023078251
Author: Lewis White Beck,Immanuel Kant
Publisher: Pearson; 2 edition (October 15, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 128
ePub: 1174 kb
Fb2: 1181 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Kant's Groundwork (or Foundations) of the Metaphysics of Morals is probably the single most influential work of philosophical ethics since Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics

Kant's Groundwork (or Foundations) of the Metaphysics of Morals is probably the single most influential work of philosophical ethics since Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics. While Kant himself considered this a sort of introduction to ethical thinking, it's come to be his most influential and widely read work on ethics. This isn't an easy work, however. It needs to be read and re-read (and, I suppose, re-read) to be fully understood and appeciated.

The late Lewis White Beck's well-known translation, first published in 1959 and used in many undergraduate ethics courses . I must confess that I found the Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals to be a difficult read

The late Lewis White Beck's well-known translation, first published in 1959 and used in many undergraduate ethics courses, remains first-rate, with a clear, concise introduction, a short overview of Kant's life, a helpful note on the text, and a selected bibliography. I must confess that I found the Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals to be a difficult read. A densely written and lengthy treatise on a difficult subject, it was almost impenetrable to my cursory (and rather too disjointed) reading.

Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (German: Grundlegung zur Metaphysik der Sitten; 1785; also known as the Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals.

Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals (German: Grundlegung zur Metaphysik der Sitten; 1785; also known as the Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals, Grounding of the Metaphysics of Morals and the Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals) is the first of Immanuel Kant's mature works on moral philosophy and remains one of the most influential in the field.

Similar books and articles. Immanuel Kant - 1949 - Garland

Similar books and articles. Critique of Practical Reason, and Other Writings in Moral Philosophy. Immanuel Kant - 1949 - Garland. Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals and, What is Enlightenment. Immanuel Kant - 1990. Practical Schematism, Teleology and the Unity of the Metaphysics of Morals. Gary Banham - 2007 - In Kyriaki Goudeli, Pavlos Kontos & Iolis Patellis (ed., Kant: Making Reason Intuitive. Ethical Philosophy the Complete Texts of Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals, and Metaphysical Principles of Virtue, Part Ii of the Metaphysics of Morals. Immanuel Kant & James W. Ellington - 1994. What is the Purpose of a Metaphysics of Morals?

Metaphysics of Morals. IMMANUEL KANT Paton, Beck and Gregor are supe-rior to the degree that they represent increasing attentiveness to what the text says

Metaphysics of Morals. p. c. (Rethinking the Western tradition) Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-300-09486-8 (cloth)-ISBN 0-300-09487-6 (paper) 1. Ethics-Early works to 1800. Paton, Beck and Gregor are supe-rior to the degree that they represent increasing attentiveness to what the text says. Such a trend seems healthy or even inevitable.

Additional Product Features. Immanuel Kant, Lewis White Beck. Place of Publication. Current slide {CURRENT SLIDE} of {TOTAL SLIDES}- Best-selling in Non-Fiction Books. The Fast 800 by Michael Mosley Paperback Book 3 Day Express Delivery.

Lewis White Beck (September 26, 1913 – June 7, 1997) was an American philosopher and scholar of German philosophy. Beck was Burbank Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy at the University of Rochester and served as the Philosophy Department. Beck was Burbank Professor of Intellectual and Moral Philosophy at the University of Rochester and served as the Philosophy Department chair there from 1949 to 1966. He translated several of Immanuel Kant's works, such as the Critique of Practical Reason, and was the author of Studies in the Philosophy of Kant (1965).

In this book Kant looks for ground to build a system of moral and ethics on. While it has flaws, for its time his conclusions are breath taking. Inasmuch as we can praise Kant's brilliance and analytical rigour, the Metaphysics of Morals falls patently flat if only because he is overextending the gains he has made in the first Critique to apply to the domain of ethics. Any movement from "is" to "ought" (. the shift from ontology to ethics) is going to be fraught with perils. I would say that, from the standpoint of Kant's entire oeuvre, this is his lowest point.

Complete summary of Immanuel Kant's Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. These laws are metaphysical in that they can be discerned a priori-that is, by the exercise of pure reason and without reference to psychology. eNotes plot summaries cover all the significant action of Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals. Kant’s goal is to set forth the supreme principle of morality. The attempt is organized into three sections. In the first section, he argues that only a will may be good in any unqualified sense. For Kant, a good will is one that acts not only in accordance with duty but also from a sense of duty.

The Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals or Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, Immanuel Kant's first contribution to moral philosophy, argues for an a priori basis for morality. Where the Critique of Pure Reason laid out Kant's metaphysical and epistemological ideas, this relatively short, primarily meta-ethical, work was intended to outline and define the concepts and arguments shaping his future work The Metaphysics of Morals. However, the latter work is much less read than the Groundwork.
Comments: (7)
Moonshaper
Nice and new.
Manemanu
Bought for class
Armin
school
Jusari
good :)
Damand
I Kant believe I am writing a review about this book as it brings back some bad memories of late night crams and caffeine withdrawal. Enough about college, the book is very lightweight and the pages are thick enough to highlight without bleeding through.

I will let you decide whether or not you like the Kant-ent of the book. (ok ok, enough of the puns)
Braswyn
Kant's Groundwork (or Foundations) of the Metaphysics of Morals is probably the single most influential work of philosophical ethics since Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics. While Kant himself considered this a sort of introduction to ethical thinking, it's come to be his most influential and widely read work on ethics. Despite its length--it's less than a hundred pages--this is a work of remarkable depth and intellectual insight.
This isn't an easy work, however. It needs to be read and re-read (and, I suppose, re-read) to be fully understood and appeciated. I've never found Kant as difficult and obscure as his reputation would suggest, but as a writer of philosophical prose he's certainly not the caliber of, say, Hume or Descartes. As many have noted, Kant is the first great philosopher of the modern era to have been an academic, and it shows. He writes long, meandering sentences, and the organization of his works leaves quite a bit to be desired. Furthermore, his penchant for arcane terminology and architechtonic can make his work seem more forbidding than it is. Still, Kant's ideas in the Groundwork, while subtle and sometimes elusive, are profound and original, and this book is a must-read for anyone interested in philosophical ethics. I should also note that the importance of this book isn't solely historical since there has been a recent resurgence of Kantian moral thinking in the English-speaking world.
Kant's aim in the Groundwork is to discover the fundamental principle of morality. In the first section he attempts to derive this fundamental principle from odinary moral thought. In particular, he attempts to derive this principle from considerations concerning what is unconditionally good. Kant claims that the only thing that is unconditionally good is a good will. Moreover, its goodness is not a matter of the results of acting on a good will; it is good in itself. As a matter of fact, Kant claims that the results of an action done with a good will and the aims and inclinations of the agent with the good will are morally insignificant.
What, then, is it to act with a good will? It is, Kant argues, a matter of doing one's duty for duty's sake, regardless of one's feeling and the results of doing so. What is it to act from duty's sake? It is to act from principles that accord with the fundamental principle of morality. And here we get the first formulation of the fundamental principle of morality: act only on maxims that you can consistently will to be universal laws. In other words, if one is unable to will the principle of one's action to become a universal law, the action is morally impermissible.
In the second section of the Groundwork Kant attempts to draw the same conclusion from some philosophical points about the nature of duty. He begins by claiming that our knowledge of our duty is a priori and based on the exercise of reason. He then argues that facts about our duties are necessary facts, and that this shows that they must be based on a categorical imperative: that is, that our duties apply to us insofar as we are rational beings, irrespective of the contingent aspects of their nature. And, Kant argues, the one categorical imperative is the fundamental principle of morality mentioned above. He then applies this principle to some examples in order to display just how it grounds our duties in particular cases.
The rest of the second section is filled with lots of interesting, ableit abstruse, ideas. First, Kant attempts to ground the categorical imperative in something that is of unconditional worth. What is that something? The existence of rational beings, which, he says, is an end in itself. And this leads to a second formulation of the categorical imperative: (ii) act only in such a way that you treat humanity, whether in the person of yourself or someone else, as an end and never merely as a means.
This section also includes a third formulation of the categorical imperative: (iii) act only on maxims that you could will to become universal laws legislated by your own will. This formulation encapsulates Kant's claim that we can achieve autonomy only by acting in accordance with the moral law. Conformity with the moral law does not constrain our freedom since we legislate the moral law for ourselves. The moral law is not forced on us from without; its source is to be found in our own rational nature. Indeed, it is only by acting morally that we are able to achieve genuine freedom by transcending the contingent desires and inclinations that are beyond our control.
Of course, that doesn't come close to summing up the Groundwork. But it's a start.
This edition of the Groundwork, which has been translated by Lewis White Beck, is a readable one. It is, perhaps, easier to read than many other editions of the Groundwork, though it may provide for this readability at the cost of some accuracy. Beck's edition also includes a copy of Kant's essay "What is Enlightenment?" along with some slight editorial material. There's a short, albeit useful, introductory essay in which Beck sketches the main outlines of the argument of the Groundwork's three sections and considers and dismisses some common objections to Kant's moral theory. The editorial also material includes a very short biographical sketch and a slight and out-of-date bibliography. Neither of these is very helpful. There are better editions of the Groundwork out there--see, for example, the editions published by Cambridge (translation by Gregor) and by Harper (translation by Paton)--but this is fine edition for the student and the general reader. And it comes at a good price.
Ubrise
Exactly the interpretation I wanted.
For those of you who may be philosophy majors or have another reason to be particular about the translation you receive be aware that this title as a kindle e-book is not translated by Lewis White Beck as each of the photos of the book suggest. Instead when i ordered it as an e-book I received a Thomas Kingsmill Abbott translation. This to some may not seem important, but translations hold important differences also the Thomas Kingsmill Abbott translation is abundantly available for free rather than paying $5.