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eBook Cinema and Soviet Society: From the Revolution to the Death of Stalin (KINO - The Russian Cinema) download

by Peter Kenez

eBook Cinema and Soviet Society: From the Revolution to the Death of Stalin (KINO - The Russian Cinema) download ISBN: 1860646328
Author: Peter Kenez
Publisher: I.B.Tauris (March 7, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1623 kb
Fb2: 1185 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: docx azw lrf lit
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Cinema and Soviet Society book. Kenez gives a pretty comprehensive but concise history of cinema in Russia from just prior to the revolutions of 1917 till Stalin's death.

Cinema and Soviet Society book. You end up coming away with a huge appreciation of what a few young revolutionaries were able to do with not the best materials but real passion to innovate and change the world. Jul 30, 2008 Chelsea added it.

The story of Soviet film in the period covered by Peter Kenez is central to the history of world cinema.

The story of Soviet film over the period covered by Peter Kenez is central to the history of World Cinema.

The author explores the roots of Soviet cinema in the film heritage of pre-Revolutionary Russia; the changes in content, style . The story of Soviet film in the period covered by Peter Kenez is central to the history of world cinema.

The author explores the roots of Soviet cinema in the film heritage of pre-Revolutionary Russia; the changes in content, style, technical means, an. The author explores the roots of Soviet cinema in the film heritage of pre-Revolutionary Russia; the changes in content, style, technical means, and production capacities generated by the Revolution of 1917; the constraints on form and subject imposed from the 1930s in the name of Socialist Realism; the relative freedom of expression accorded to film-makers during World War Two; and.

Kenez viewed The Vow as "a turning point in Soviet cinema. Kino: A History of the Russian and Soviet Film. George Allen & Unwin. Cinema and Soviet Society from the Revolution to the Death of Stalin. ISBN 978-1-86064-632-4. It set the tone for many others to follow. And so became the model for other filmmakers. p. 394. ^ a b c The Vow. kinoglaz.

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Cinema and Soviet Society : From the Revolution to the Death of Stalin. KINO - The Russian and Soviet Cinema. By (author) Peter Kenez. Nov 15, 2017 Karthik36 rated it liked it.

The story of Soviet film in the period covered by Peter Kenez is central to the history of world cinema. The author explores the roots of Soviet cinema in the film heritage of pre-Revolutionary Russia; the changes in content, style, technical means, and production capacities generated by the Revolution of 1917; the constraints on form and subject imposed from the 1930s in the name of Socialist Realism; the relative freedom of expression accorded to film-makers during World War Two; and the extraordinary repression during the final years of the Stalin era.

Comments: (3)
Unereel
I am reading it with great enthusiasm. A scholarly approach. He states if you want to read about popular films (my words) that can be found elsewhere. He presents a scholarly review of the times, the organizations, censorship (more so "collaboration") that went into surveillance of and censorship of films. Turns out serendipity, naivete, and political repression (including murder by camp of directors) was rampant.
Lamranilv
Perfect...not too big...not too small!
Vital Beast
Anyone who wants to understand the movies of the Soviet Union should start with this book. It is very thorough and written in a lively, bright style that is free of academic jargon.
Kenez begins with the pre-Revolutionary film industry and shows how it broke down and was built back up by the Soviets. He pays equal attention to the "high art" films that were famous in the West for decades (those of Eisenstein and Pudovkin) and the entertainment films that attracted the average Soviet citizen (such as the musical comedies of the 1930s, like "Volga-Volga.") He shows how Soviet movies responded to the imposition of Socialist Realism, World War II, and the cultural freeze of the late Stalin era.
The only problem with this book is that it is TOO SHORT. Upon reaching the end, the reader wants to see Kenez tackle the films of the Khrushchev Thaw and the Brezhnev era. However, one should be thankful for what one has, and in this volume, one has a truly indispensible book.