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eBook The Warden download

by Nigel Hawthorne,Anthony Trollope

eBook The Warden download ISBN: 0754055027
Author: Nigel Hawthorne,Anthony Trollope
Publisher: Chivers Audio Books; Unabridged edition (June 1, 2002)
Language: English
ePub: 1678 kb
Fb2: 1465 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr docx lit azw
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

I discovered Anthony Trollope and "The Warden" recently, and it has been like finding buried treasure. This is the first of Anthony Trollope's "Chronicles of Barsetshire" novels, and his first popularly successful novel

I discovered Anthony Trollope and "The Warden" recently, and it has been like finding buried treasure. This is the first of Anthony Trollope's "Chronicles of Barsetshire" novels, and his first popularly successful novel. The basic plot is that the Warden, Mr. Harding, has 1) a sinecure church position that pays him 800 pounds a year; 2) a reform-minded friend who's trying to abolish church sinecures; 3) a daughter who wants to marry the reform-minded friend; and 4) an existing son-in-law of an Archdeacon who takes defending the Rights of the Church.

Anthony Trollope (/ˈtrɒləp/; 24 April 1815 – 6 December 1882) was an English novelist of the Victorian era. Among his best-known works is a series of novels collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, which revolves around the imaginary coun. Among his best-known works is a series of novels collectively known as the Chronicles of Barsetshire, which revolves around the imaginary county of Barsetshire. He also wrote novels on political, social, and gender issues, and other topical matters. Trollope's literary reputation dipped somewhat during the last years of his life, but he had regained the esteem of critics by the mid-20th century.

THE WARDEN ANTHONY TROLLOPE was born in London in 1815 and died in 1882. His father was a barrister who went bankrupt and the family was maintained by his mother, Frances, who resourcefully in. ANTHONY TROLLOPE was born in London in 1815 and died in 1882. His father was a barrister who went bankrupt and the family was maintained by his mother, Frances, who resourcefully in later life became a bestselling writer. He received little education and his childhood generally seems to have been an unhappy one. Happily established in a successful career in the Post Office (from which he retired in 1867), Trollope’s first novel was published in 1847.

Read By – Nigel Hawthorne (2.

Read By – Nigel Hawthorne (2). Notes. Of Errors ARGO 1115 The Trasury Of Victorian Poetry ARGO 1118 Wartime Speeches ARGO 1121 The House At Pooh Corner ARGO 1127 Hamlet ARGO 1130 Twelfth Night ARGO 1136 Silas Marner ARGO 1139 Your Favourite Poems ARGO 1142 A Christmas Carol ARGO 1145 Ghost Stories ARGO 1151 More Railway Sories ARGO 1154 Jungle Book Stories ARGO 1157 Othello ARGO 1160 The Taming Of.

Anthony Trollope (24 April 1815 – 6 December 1882) became one of the most successful, prolific and respected English novelists of the Victorian era. Some of Trollope's best-loved works, known as the C. Some of Trollope's best-loved works, known as the . .

Anthony Trollope's stock-in-trade was the life of the great drawing rooms of mid-Victorian England, where the thirst for wealth and political power and the need for love continually formed and reformed in unexpected, illuminating combinations. Can You Forgive Her?, the story of Alice Vavasor, her conundrums in love, and her confusions about the rights and duties of a modern, is the first novel in his magnificent Palliser series; it is energized on every page by the affectionate and ironicdelight Trollope felt in observing the entanglements of his splendid characters.

Trollope perfectly read by Nigel Hawthorne. Did enjoy Edward Fox. Best narrative for a long time. Careful read of a favourite book. Anthony Trollope’s The Warden was the first of Trollope’s hugely successful Barchester Chronicles, appearing in 1855 and reversing the rather unfortunate sales of his previous three novels. It concerns the story of Mr. Septimus Harding, Warden of Hiram's Hospital almshouses and Precentor of Barchester Cathedral.

1146 quotes from Anthony Trollope: 'A small daily task, if it be really daily, will beat the labours of a spasmodic Hercules ― Anthony Trollope, The Warden.

1146 quotes from Anthony Trollope: 'A small daily task, if it be really daily, will beat the labours of a spasmodic Hercules. Was ever anything so civil?', and 'That I can read and be happy while I am reading, is a great blessing. Anthony Trollope, The Warden.

The novelist on learning from John Updike, failing to read Anthony Trollope and the laugh-out-loud comedy of Nina Stibbe. London’s oldest bookshop chooses first instalment of Trollope’s Barsetshire Chronicles, The Warden, as best novel published since the shop’s opening in 1797. Published: 22 Nov 2019. Ann Patchett: ‘Hunger by Roxane Gay opened my eyes’. Published: 27 Nov 2015. Anthony Trollope tops Hatchards poll to find best novel of past 200 years. Reading American cities Reading American cities: books about Cincinnati.

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Comments: (7)
Rocksmith
This is the first of Anthony Trollope's "Chronicles of Barsetshire" novels, and his first popularly successful novel. The basic plot is that the Warden, Mr. Harding, has 1) a sinecure church position that pays him 800 pounds a year; 2) a reform-minded friend who's trying to abolish church sinecures; 3) a daughter who wants to marry the reform-minded friend; and 4) an existing son-in-law of an Archdeacon who takes defending the Rights of the Church very, very seriously.

If you like Jane Austen novels there's a good chance you'll like this, as the basic plots -- church livings, the marriage prospects of 19th-centry british gentry -- are fairly similar. Trollope's prose here is fairly light and clear, and if not quite as sharply witty as Austen's, no one else's prose is either. Trollope does spill a great deal of ink on lengthy asides to the reader, some of which paint interesting pictures of contemporary British culture and some of which modern readers may find *amazingly* skippable.

Overall, this one's a lightly pleasant example of precisely the sort of intelligent, Victorian parlor romance it's trying to be. If you like this, the next volume in sequence is Barchester Towers; it's a bit more comically satirical, somewhere in between this and P.G. Wodehouse, but almost certainly something you'll enjoy if you liked this one.
Silly Dog
This book is the first of six novels in the Barsetshire series of novels written by Trollope in the 1870s. Trollope is considered to be one of the best authors of Britain's Victorian age. All six volumes are very entertaining reads. These volumes are beautifully produced by Oxford University Press in their World Classics series. Why I choose the title for the review of this book is that this series is a presentation of England at the time it was written. The characters feel they lived in the best of all possible worlds-that the British Empire would rule the world forever and they were the luchiest people ever to be born when and where they were. They are close enough to us for the modern reader to reconise as us. When we read these volumes we see many things wrong with their society. I have the feeling that when people who live 120 years in the future look back they will see us and our society the same way we look back on the characters in these books. You will enjoy these books if you read them-hopefully they will make you think of matters we seldom think of.
Tygolar
I bought this after reading an article in The New Yorker about a burgeoning revival of interest in Anthony Trollope. I selected "The Warden" for rather shameful reasons: (a) it was short; and (b) it was inexpensive. I enjoyed it more than I thought I would. The prose is definitely mannered: it is clearly a product of its era; and mild intrigue within the Church of England is not terribly gripping. However it's a nice period piece, and Trollope does get off a few "good ones", within the context of his time and place. The background is interesting - the politics and economics of caring for the aged poor in 19th century English villages. Quite a nice evening's reading.
Tori Texer
I have seen references to Anthony Trollope from time to time for decades, but didn't realise that he was a novelist; I thought he was an essayist. I like The Warden and I like Mr. Harding, the Warden. Trollope's characters seem very real to me. Mr. Harding has flaws, perhaps too willing to float through his life accepting what he is given, but heroically follows his conscience when it matters.
The Kindle version of this book has no problems that I notice. I am now reading the second book in the series.
Chinon
In the 15th century, Hiram's Hospital was established as a perpetual charitable home for 12 poor old men, each being replaced at his death. Over the years the income from the property of the estate has increased to the point where the warden of the hospital enjoys a substantial salary.
The Rev. Septimus Harding (the Warden), kind, gentle, and conscientious, loves his comfortable position and is loved by the old men under his care - until his life is disrupted by a REFORMER, in the person of young John Bold, who questions the ample income of the warden, while the old men still receive only pennies a day. Bold brings in a solicitor and interests the newspaper The Jupiter (obviously the London Times), which makes the issue a national debate.
Although the church stands behind the warden with all its influence, the gentle Mr. Harding himself begins to doubt the propriety of his position. The matter becomes further complicated when Bold and Harding's daughter Eleanor fall in love.
This first of the six Barsetshire novels is by far the shortest and concentrates almost exclusively on the main plot. (In fact, Trollope inserts a criticism of the long serial novels of the day, although he later adopted that same mode.) "The Warden" is not so rich in detail or in the extensive cultural ambience of the later novels, but it is an excellent introduction to this deservedly acclaimed series. It introduces many vivid characters who grow and develop delightfully in the later novels.