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eBook The Israel-Arab Reader: A Documentary History of the Middle East Conflict: Sixth Revised and Updated Edition download

by Barry Rubin,Walter Laqueur

eBook The Israel-Arab Reader: A Documentary History of the Middle East Conflict: Sixth Revised and Updated Edition download ISBN: 0140297138
Author: Barry Rubin,Walter Laqueur
Publisher: Penguin Books; Revised edition (August 1, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 580
ePub: 1508 kb
Fb2: 1680 kb
Rating: 4.9
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Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

The Israel-Arab Reader impliedly offers a complete set of official documents on the Israel-Arab dispute. Certainly the reference work contains numerous official pronouncements of both major and minor significance. Unfortunately, the book omits ten important texts.

Middle East - History - Sources. Other names: Laqueur, Walter. Published July 1st 2001 by Penguin Putnam Inc. (first published 1969). The Israel/Arab Reader: A Documentary History of the Middle East Conflict. 0140297138 (ISBN13: 9780140297133).

Manifesto (April 1963), United Arab Republic.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Manifesto (April 1963), United Arab Republic. 6. rev. and updated ed. External-identifier. urn:asin:0140297138 urn:oclc:record:1035896878.

He has written many books on Middle East politics.

Arab-Israeli conflict. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana.

The Israel-Arab Reader is a thorough and up-to-date guide to the continuing crisis in the Middle East. Walter Louis Laqueur was born in Breslau, Germany on May 26, 1921

The Israel-Arab Reader is a thorough and up-to-date guide to the continuing crisis in the Middle East. It covers the full spectrum of the Israel-Arab conflict-from the earliest days, through the wars and peacemaking efforts, up to the Israel-PLO and Israel-Jordan peace accords. Walter Louis Laqueur was born in Breslau, Germany on May 26, 1921. At the age of 17, he fled just a few days before Kristallnacht and found his way to Palestine, where he was known as Ze'ev. He worked briefly on a kibbutz before moving to Jerusalem, where he spent a year enrolled in the Hebrew University and covered the Middle East as a journalist.

The israel-arab reader. Walter Laqueur was born in Breslau (then in Germany) in 1921. He is Director of the Institute of Contemporary History and the Wiener Library in London and Professor of the History of Ideas and Politics at Brandeis University in America.

An essential resource, completely revised and updated for the sixtieth anniversary of the founding of. .In print for forty years, The Israel-Arab Reader is a thorough and up-to-date guide to the continuing crisis in the Middle East.

An essential resource, completely revised and updated for the sixtieth anniversary of the founding of IsraelIn print for forty years, The Israel-Arab Reader is a thorough and up-to-date guide to the continuing crisis in the Middle East.

The Israel-Arab Reader is a thorough and up-to-date guide to the continuing crisis in the . He has written many books on Middle East politics. rom the earliest days, through the wars and peacemaking efforts, up to the Israel-PLO and Israel-Jordan peace accords. This comprehensive reference includes speeches, letters, articles, and reports dealing with all the major interests in the area from all of the relevant political parties and world leaders.

A historical overview of the continuing crisis in the Middle East traces the course of the Israel-Arab conflict from its earliest origins, through the various wars, skirmishes, and peace efforts, to the Israel-PLO and Israel-Jordan peace accords, in a collection of articles, speeches, letters, and reports dealing with all aspects of the subject. Original.
Comments: (7)
Doulkree
The Israel-Arab Reader impliedly offers a complete set of official documents on the Israel-Arab dispute. Certainly the reference work contains numerous official pronouncements of both major and minor significance. Unfortunately, the book omits ten important texts. Even more disturbing, the omissions favor only the Arab side of the story. The missing items are:

1. 1919: Covenant of the League of Nations: In Article 22 of the Covenant the post-World War I Allied Supreme Council established a process to recognize “certain communities” in the former Ottoman Empire as “independent nations.” Though the Israel-Arab Reader does not contain this seminal document it does contain the 1988 PLO Declaration of Independence, which falsely claimed that Article 22 resolved to make Palestine an Arab nation.

2. 1920: Resolutions of the San Remo Conference. These resolutions gave Great Britain temporary civilian authority to make Palestine “a national home for the Jewish people.”

3. 1920: Treaty of Sevres. This treaty formally partitioned the Ottoman Empire. Consistent with the San Remo Resolutions, Article 95 of the treaty implemented the Covenant of the League of Nations by authorizing the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people.

4. 1923: The Jordanian Nationality Law. This law, adopted by the country that replaced most of Palestine, expressly prohibited Jews from citizenship.

5. 1949: The Armistice Agreements. These agreements marked the end of Israel’s 1948 War of Independence. They said the “Green Line” (the battle line when the fighting stopped) must not be construed as a border. The documents refute the Palestinian argument that the Green Line should be the Israeli-Palestinian border.

6. 1956: The Suez War. Egypt provoked this war with Israel, Great Britain and France by violating the above-mentioned Armistice Agreements. The war produced important statements before the U.N. on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

7. 1964: The Palestinian National Covenant (the “PLO Charter”). The Palestine Liberation Organization’s founding document dedicated the organization’s political allegiance to “the Arab Nation” (i.e. Greater Syria), not Palestine.

8. 1967: The Khartoum Resolution. In this document the Arab League resolved to continue attacking Israel in defiance of binding U.N. Security Council Resolution 242. The resolution became known as “the 3 No’s” because the stated position towards Israel vowed there would be no peace, no recognition, and no negotiations.

9. 1974: The Phased Plan. The Palestinian National Council adopted this strategy to destroy Israel in territorial phases through terrorism, as opposed to a single full-scale war.

10. 1975: U.N. General Assembly Resolution 3379. The resolution called Zionism a form of “racism.” Although the pronouncement was eventually overturned, it revealed the extent of anti-Israel hatred among many U.N. members.
Oparae
The history of the modern Middle East is complicated, especially so in the case of eastern Mediterranean. For this reason (among many others), the collection of documents by Laqueur and Rubin has been in print for over 60 years and has gone through 7 editions - it is detailed, comprehensive and most importantly provides in a single place arguably all of the most critical documents that have shaped the political frontiers of what was the British mandate of Palestine and is now the state of Israel.

Beginning with documents from early Zionists and Pan-Arabists (the Bilu Group, Hertzl and the League of the Arab Fatherland), the history of the region and the antecedents to the current conflict are shown as each group seeks to shape the land to their own political interests (or to influence others to mold it towards their own ends) up to the Annapolis Conference of 2007. The variety of voices and perspectives is dizzying, underscoring the complex intersection of interests: European imperialists, Arab nationalists, Zionists, religious leaders of all stripes and persuasions, and the policy papers, reactions, speeches and transcripts from conferences. These are presented without editorial remarks or even an introduction by the editors. It is an excellent collection of primary documents relating to the region.

A legitimate criticism is the lack of maps, which would go far to help provide reference and give a clearer picture of the numerous changes and recommendations made throughout the book. However, given the breadth and completeness of the documents included here, I can't give the book anything less than 5 stars . For anyone interested in reading the raw materials from which history is written (and which are critical in understanding where Palestinian, Israeli and Arab are coming from regarding their attitudes and perspectives on this place), this is a must-have text. Similalry, for any serious historian of the region, this is an invaluable resource. Highly recommended.
Ventelone
Depending on who you are, this is either one of the greatest books you've ever slogged through or the absolute cure for your rampet insomnia problem. When it says documentry history, it means it in the truest sense of the world as the book contains 620+ pages of every major document concearning the Arab-Israeli problem. You hear from multiple U.S. presidents, various leaders of Israel and representitives of the Palestinian people, and others on the longest conflict known to modern mankind. It does not take the reader long to understand how no one has really been able to solve this thing with any lasting results (Israel-Egypt peace excepted)This is not a book for the faint of heart though as many of the documents are written in governmentese and labourous to get through, but it provides the clearest snapshot of the conflict i've heard.
Skiletus
Good insight to the historical and contemporary development of the state of Israel and the sadly fruitless efforts to effect a true peace. It is clear this will not happen until Hamas and Hizbollah decide in deeds to recognize Israel's right to exist. An excellent read fir those who wish to go beneath the headlines and understand the reality of the conflict.
Bladecliff
This is a great resource to get a collection of primary sources on the Palestinian-Israeli Comflict. It contains the important documents and important speeches from Nasser and other leaders. It seems a bit lacking in speeches and interviews of prominent Israelis at some points but the majority of these sources are easily found on websites such as the Jewish Virtual Library. It would be great to have everything in one source, but this is still an excellent collection that would benefit any historian studying this period.