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eBook Video Critical: Children, the Environment, and Media Power (Acamedia Research Monograph) download

by David Gauntlett

eBook Video Critical: Children, the Environment, and Media Power (Acamedia Research Monograph) download ISBN: 1860205135
Author: David Gauntlett
Publisher: John Libbey Publishing (January 3, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 188
ePub: 1753 kb
Fb2: 1592 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf mbr lrf lit
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

David Gauntlett is a lecturer in communications at the University of Bournemouth.

David Gauntlett is a lecturer in communications at the University of Bournemouth. He is the author of Moving Experiences.

Start by marking Video Critical: Children, The Environment And Media Power as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Video Critical : Children, the Environment and Media Power.

David Gauntlett (born 15 March 1971) is a British sociologist and media theorist, and the author of several books including Making is Connecting. His earlier work concerned contemporary media audiences, and has moved towards a focus on the everyday making and sharing of digital media and social media, as well as the power of making in general, and the role of these activities in self-identity and building creative cultures.

Spaces for Children: The Built Environment and Child Development. environment on children. Children’s Special Places: Exploring the Role of Forts, Dens, and Bush Houses in Middle Childhood. Many of the texts in General Overviews and Environments of Risk reflect this concern.

Video critical: Children, the environment and media power. Indiana University Press, 1996. The worrying influence of" media effects" studies. IAMCR, Porto Alegre, Brazil, 25-30, 2004. The LEGO System as a tool for thinking, creativity, and changing the world. LEGO Studies: Examining the Building Blocks of a Transmedial Phenomenon, 1-16, 2014.

With over 100 million copies of his books sold, Nicholas. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Book DescriptionThis critical examination of ve television, video-on-demand, high-definition television, and virtual reality-is presented from a social science perspective

Book DescriptionThis critical examination of ve television, video-on-demand, high-definition television, and virtual reality-is presented from a social science perspective.

Media, Gender and Identity: An Introduction. Video Critical: Children, the Environment, and Media Power

Media, Gender and Identity: An Introduction. David John Gauntlett. Video Critical: Children, the Environment, and Media Power.

Exploring the contribution that television can make to a child's understanding of the world, this book argues fiercely against the attempts of psychologists to explain complex social issues in individualistic terms. The findings of a new research method developed especially for this study, in which groups of schoolchildren were given video equipment to facilitate their making original video productions, are presented. Taking the environment as their focus, the videos suggest that the children's views of both environmental issues and the mass media are complex and contradictory.

Comments: (2)
Endieyab
In an even-handed examination of how mass media forms the boundaries of environmental issues, David Guantlett, with skill and clarity maneuvers through potentially difficult and theory-ladden "critical theory," incorporating a Herman/Chomsky (Manufacturing Consent) edge, examining the way television affects the way audiences frame the incredibly complicated and inter-penetrating social issues of environmental problems. Guantlett is not so much interested in whether the mass media is culpable of intensionally ignoring or avoiding environmental issues. Instead he discovers through a creative study that children audiences have internalized environmental problems and their solutions in a one-dimensional "narrative": the problem has been created by individuals and is to be then solved by individuals. So what's the problem with that? It seems clear enough that if there are environmental problems, they are nothing more that an accumulation and combination of individual lifestyle choices and subsequent actions. Right? Not so fast. Within this "individualistic" problem/solution framework, how do we account for and address instances of polluting industries that fall within government and legal regulations? Moreover, how do we address the environmentally problematic social institutions, such as the wide-spread car-centered transportation rubrics through an "individual" problem/solution framework? Is there not an equally complicit socio-political aspect to environmental issues? And why is this aspect, the environmentally comprimising social institutions, missing withing environmental news coverage? Guantlett's subltle, yet powerful analysis shows that the important "absent narrative" within television coverage of environmental issues is nothing as diabolical, cliche, or as simple as a conspiracy thoery, but rather the normal outcome of the workings of modern industial capitalism, corporate owned media, and thus an increasingly narrow ideological framework of acceptable media content. Guantlett's work is on the money - so to speak.
A worthwhile sidenote: anyone who can incorporate Horkheimer, Adorno, Marx, and Beavis and Butthead into a single chapter about mass media and society is a five-star book for that reason alone - enjoy!