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eBook More: The Politics of Economic Growth in Postwar America download

by Robert M. Collins

eBook More: The Politics of Economic Growth in Postwar America download ISBN: 0195152638
Author: Robert M. Collins
Publisher: Oxford University Press (April 4, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1439 kb
Fb2: 1612 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: rtf txt lit doc
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

More is one of those rare books that will actually change how historians perceive the past

More is one of those rare books that will actually change how historians perceive the past.

In More, Robert M. Collins reexamines the history of the United States from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Bill Clinton, focusing on the federal government's determined pursuit of economic growth. After tracing the emergence of growth as a priority during FDR's presidency, Collins explores the record of successive administrations, highlighting both their success in fostering growth and its partisan uses

Americans have not always embraced economic growth, nor has the . Looking at history through the lens of economic growth, Collins puts postwar American society in a whole new perspective.

Americans have not always embraced economic growth, nor has the . economy grown consistently through the 20th century. But overall, Collins's wonderfully illuminating, engrossing analysis illustrates, through the century there was a move toward endorsing increasingly exuberant expansion. A professor of history at the University of Missouri-Columbia, Collins tells the story of American economic growth as it waxed and waned and waxed again from the.

Collins Robert M. (EN). James Carville famously reminded Bill Clinton throughout 1992 that its the economy, stupid. Yet, for the last forty years, historians of modern America have ignored the economy to focus on cultural, social, and political themes, from the birth of modern feminism to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Now a scholar has stepped forward to place the economy back in its rightful place, at the center of his historical narrative. In More, Robert M. Collins reexamines the history of the United States from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Bill Clinton, focusing on the federal governments.

Home Browse Books Book details, More: The Politics of Economic . Attitudes regarding economic growth varied widely during the Great Depression.

Home Browse Books Book details, More: The Politics of Economic Growth in Postwar. More: The Politics of Economic Growth in Postwar America. By Robert M. Collins. the twelve Southerners who in 1930 contributed to the sympo-. Over 14 million journal, magazine, and newspaper articles.

Поставляется из: Англии Описание: Robert M. Collins re-examines the history of the United States from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Bill Clinton, focusing on the federal governments determined pursuit of economic growth. He explores the record of successive administrations in fostering growth, and its partisan uses. 00 -20% Наличие на складе: Есть (1 ш.

Yet, for the last forty years, historians of modern America have.

Collins covers the behind-the-scenes maneuvering that gave rise to a culture of economic growth in the . President Eisenhower, for one, was dubious of the wisdom of heightening economic growth to new levels. Advocates of maximum growth eventually carried the day, leading to the current situation, in which both major political parties try to outdo each other in promising and delivering economic growth, with little attention to the quality of life and environmental consequences. bkinetic, October 15, 2010.

The Politics of Economic Growth in Postwar America. Robert Collins' book explores the growth of America in terms of material prosperity. Collins interweaves economic history and cultural analysis onto his examination of postwar growth politics. The book contrasts the reasons for expansion and the way it has occurred in the past fifty years with the negative effects it has produced and the reactions against it. He also looks at the attitudes and behaviors that have developed as Americans have become a people of more. More is one of those rare books that will actually change how historians perceive the past. After tracing the emergence of growth as a priority during FDR's presidency, Collins explores the record of successive administrations, highlighting both their success in fostering growth and its partisan uses

James Carville famously reminded Bill Clinton throughout 1992 that "it's the economy, stupid." Yet, for the last forty years, historians of modern America have ignored the economy to focus on cultural, social, and political themes, from the birth of modern feminism to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Now a scholar has stepped forward to place the economy back in its rightful place, at the center of his historical narrative. In More, Robert M. Collins reexamines the history of the United States from Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Bill Clinton, focusing on the federal government's determined pursuit of economic growth. After tracing the emergence of growth as a priority during FDR's presidency, Collins explores the record of successive administrations, highlighting both their success in fostering growth and its partisan uses. Collins reveals that the obsession with growth appears not only as a matter of policy, but as an expression of Cold War ideology--both a means to pay for the arms build-up and proof of the superiority of the United States' market economy. But under Johnson, this enthusiasm sparked a crisis: spending on Vietnam unleashed runaway inflation, while the nation struggled with the moral consequences of its prosperity, reflected in books such as John Kenneth Galbraith's The Affluent Society and Rachel Carson's Silent Spring. More continues up to the end of the 1990s, as Collins explains the real impact of Reagan's policies and astutely assesses Clinton's "disciplined growthmanship," which combined deficit reduction and a relaxed but watchful monetary policy by the Federal Reserve. Writing with eloquence and analytical clarity, Robert M. Collins offers a startlingly new framework for understanding the history of postwar America.
Comments: (4)
Gosar
"Postwar America is over." (More, pg. 232.)

This 2000 book traces the arc of the US political economy, and the dilemmas that are emerging so fractiously today (November 2016, with Donald Trump newly elected and a GOP Congress in). With great discipline and choice of details, the path is traced from the world of my boyhood (1960s), now vividly receding, to the dynamics of the present. Four "great national projects" postwar are detailed: the Cold War, "full citizenship" for excluded groups, "expressive individualism," and pursuit of exuberant economic growth. (Ibid, 231-232.) Some of these projects now seem poised to perhaps be abandoned or dismantled in a very compressed time. Along the way, the project and dilemmas of trying to outrun the dilemmas of growth alongside middle class welfare state entitlements (as "actuarially unsound," quoting Paul Samuelson in 1967, ibid, 229), seem to have converged, put off many times, in 2016 at long last into a potential big inflection point. Or not. It is impossible, of course, with this tiny human brain to see the narrative of the future. If I could, I would be fabulously better off -- or perhaps miserable.

I have been on a quest to understand the US political economy since WW2. I have centered on times I can remember, and which seem pivotal to the trajectory of our nation and its big inflection in the 60s-80s (and again, perhaps, now), so, the mid-60s and onward have been a focal point. I remember from boyhood, that moment when the charmed life of middle class 1960s sort of curdled and suddenly there were (inexplicable to me then) darkening clouds arriving. This book gives a great overarching framework for understanding it all. The treatment of Reagan seems relatively short, if informative (though I notice this author devoted a whole book to that era), but the emphasis on the Johnson through Nixon years was particularly revealing and insight-building. I wanted to see more nuts and bolts of decisions and hear of the decision-makers, to assemble a better big picture for myself of the dynamics of today, and this book filled the bill admirably.
Another book, recently released, slightly narrower in scope, but a worthwhile companion to this, is Marc Levinson's An Extraordinary Time: The End of the Postwar Boom and the Return of the Ordinary Economy.
Andromathris
Very solid book - kind of like Galbraith's The Affluent Society. Great resource as I earned my MA in History at UNLV, continue at UC Berkeley, and finish my first book, "The Case of the Cleantech Con Artist: A True Vegas Tale" and "Solar's Crucible" - history of solar energy in the Mojave.
Onath
Be aware that this expensive ebook does not have footnote hyper links enabled. A bit of a bummer for researchers.
Dianantrius
This book is a bit deceptive--it delivered far more than I expected. It treats the complicated economic developments of the past half-century in a clear and accessible fashion. But it also told me a surprising amount about the politics and presidents of the postwar era. I particularly liked the way it forced me to view Nixon, Reagan, and Clinton in a new light. Indeed, this book offers a new and illuminating interpretation of the entire postwar period.