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by Karen Anderson

eBook Changing Woman: A History of Racial Ethnic Women in Modern America download ISBN: 0195117883
Author: Karen Anderson
Publisher: Oxford University Press (July 24, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 304
ePub: 1473 kb
Fb2: 1476 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: doc lrf lit lrf
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Anderson (history, Univ. of Arizona) traces the complex patterns of discrimination against three major groups of racial ethnic women in the United States in the 20th century: Native American, Mexican American, and African American.

Anderson (history, Univ. Focusing on specific issues of employment, family relationships, and the role of gender in relation to race and class, Anderson sketches the resulting internal conflicts within an ethnic group as well as conflict with the dominant culture.

Now, in this illuminating volume, Karen Anderson offers the first book to examine the lives of women in the three main ethnic groups in the .

Now, in this illuminating volume, Karen Anderson offers the first book to examine the lives of women in the three main ethnic groups in the United States-Native American, Mexican American, and African American women-revealing the many ways in which these groups have suffered oppression, and the profound effects it has had on their lives. Here is a thought-provoking examination of the history of racial ethnic women, one which provides not only insigh.

Changing Woman provides the first history of women within each racial ethnic group, tracing the meager progress they have made right up to the present. Indeed, Anderson concludes that while white middle-class women have made strides toward liberation from male domination, women of color have not yet found, in feminism, any political remedy to their problems. This work seeks to provide historical perspectives on the lives of American Indian, African American, and Mexican American women in the United States over the course of the last century.

Changing Woman confirms much of the past decade's work on the history of non-white women, revealing their . Citation: Ronald Schultz.

Changing Woman confirms much of the past decade's work on the history of non-white women, revealing their exploitation as well as their resistance to economic and gender discrimination. In the final analysis, however, it is the multidimensionality of the collective portraits of these women that makes this both a mature work of interpretation and a fine teaching tool.

book by Karen Anderson.

Changing woman: A history of racial ethnic women in Modern America. New York: Oxford University Press. The influence of race and racial identity in psychotherapy: Toward a racially inclusive model. Ashly, M. Gulchrist, L. & Miramontez, A. (1988). Choney, S. Berryhill-Paapke, . & Robbins, R. R. (1995). The acculturation of American Indians. In J. Ponterotto, J. Cases, L. Suzuki & C. Alexander (Ed., Handbook of multicultural counseling. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Cohen, B. & Schermer, V. L. (2001).

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Changing Woman: A History of Racial Ethnic Women in Modern America. 1. 5 Mb. Conscious Women, Conscious Lives: Powerful and Transformational Stories of Healing Body, Mind & Soul. Joan Borysenko, Marion Woodman, Janet Matthews, Karen Jensen, Linda Anderson, Erin Davis. 750 Kb. Games magazine junior kids' big book of games.

Changing Woman examines the role of Indian, Mexican-American, and African-American women during the 20th century, focusing on the changes these years have brought about in their lives and comparing each group. A History of Racial Ethnic Women in Modern America. Karen Anderson, Associate Professor of History, University of Arizona. Hannah Mary Tabbs and the Disembodied Torso.

May be you will be interested in other books by Karen Anderson: Changing Woman: A History of Racial Ethnic .

May be you will be interested in other books by Karen Anderson: Changing Woman: A History of Racial Ethnic Women in Modern America by Karen Anderson. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: Karen Anderson. Title: Changing Woman: A History of Racial Ethnic Women in Modern America. Help us to make General-Ebooks better! Genres. Books ~~ Social Sciences~~ Ethnic Studies ~~ General.

While great strides have been made in documenting discrimination against women in America, our awareness of discrimination is due in large part to the efforts of a feminist movement dominated by middle-class white women, and is skewed to their experiences. Yet discrimination against racial ethnic women is in fact dramatically different--more complex and more widespread--and without a window into the lives of racial ethnic women our understanding of the full extent of discrimination against all women in America will be woefully inadequate. Now, in this illuminating volume, Karen Anderson offers the first book to examine the lives of women in the three main ethnic groups in the United States--Native American, Mexican American, and African American women--revealing the many ways in which these groups have suffered oppression, and the profound effects it has had on their lives. Here is a thought-provoking examination of the history of racial ethnic women, one which provides not only insight into their lives, but also a broader perception of the history, politics, and culture of the United States. For instance, Anderson examines the clash between Native American tribes and the U.S. government (particularly in the plains and in the West) and shows how the forced acculturation of Indian women caused the abandonment of traditional cultural values and roles (in many tribes, women held positions of power which they had to relinquish), subordination to and economic dependence on their husbands, and the loss of meaningful authority over their children. Ultimately, Indian women were forced into the labor market, the extended family was destroyed, and tribes were dispersed from the reservation and into the mainstream--all of which dramatically altered the woman's place in white society and within their own tribes. The book examines Mexican-American women, revealing that since U.S. job recruiters in Mexico have historically focused mostly on low-wage male workers, Mexicans have constituted a disproportionate number of the illegals entering the states, placing them in a highly vulnerable position. And even though Mexican-American women have in many instances achieved a measure of economic success, in their families they are still subject to constraints on their social and political autonomy at the hands of their husbands. And finally, Anderson cites a wealth of evidence to demonstrate that, in the years since World War II, African-American women have experienced dramatic changes in their social positions and political roles, and that the migration to large urban areas in the North simply heightened the conflict between homemaker and breadwinner already thrust upon them. Changing Woman provides the first history of women within each racial ethnic group, tracing the meager progress they have made right up to the present. Indeed, Anderson concludes that while white middle-class women have made strides toward liberation from male domination, women of color have not yet found, in feminism, any political remedy to their problems.