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eBook High Noon In The Cold War: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and The Cuban Missile Crisis download

by Max Frankel

eBook High Noon In The Cold War: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and The Cuban Missile Crisis download ISBN: 0786273429
Author: Max Frankel
Publisher: Thorndike Press; 1 edition (March 14, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 328
ePub: 1560 kb
Fb2: 1627 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: mbr azw txt lit
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Great book about the Cuban Missile crisis, the Kennedys and Khrushchev

Great book about the Cuban Missile crisis, the Kennedys and Khrushchev. Having been very young during this time it was interesting to realize how much I remembered. How lucky we were that Kennedy and Khushchev knew what was at stake and were more interested in perserving the world then destroying it, even though they came close. In this book Mr. Frankel gives a great explanation of the Cuban Missile Crisis, not only by explaining it in easy to understand terms but also by giving his readers an overview of the event as well as the causes and the effects. A really easy read and I rather enjoyed it.

The Cuban Missle crisis makes for dramatic reading. As the name implies, Frankel focuses on the actions, decisions, and thoughts of the two major players in the crisis - President Kennedy and Premier Khrushchev. The writing is fast paced and takes you into the meetings and minds of Kennedy and Khrushchev and their top advisors, both civilian and military. It is hard to believe today, but we had senior military men, led by Air Force General Curtis LeMay, who were in favor of attacking Cuba without even giving diplomacy or a naval quarantine a chance. Frankel was a correspondent for the New York Times and reported on the crisis at the time.

Much has been written about the Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962, when the United States and Soviet Union . MAX FRANKEL is one of America’s preeminent journalists.

Much has been written about the Cuban Missile Crisis of October 1962, when the United States and Soviet Union clashed over construction of Soviet nuclear missile bases in Cuba. He won the Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of President Nixon’s trip to China in 1972 and is the author of a nationally bestselling memoir, The Times of My Life and My Life with the Times. He lives in New York City.

Max Frankel in his remarkable new book, High Noon in the Cold War, has changed all that. Khrushchev allowed Castro to retain the defensive antiaircraft batteries provided he not use them against American U-2 high altitude surveillance planes, left a 3,000 man Soviet combat brigade on the island, and Castro was promised that he would never have to pay for any future Soviet defensive weaponry.

During the Cuban Missile Crisis, leaders of the . Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev had gambled on sending the missiles to Cuba with the specific goal of increasing his nation’s nuclear strike capability. The Soviets had long felt uneasy about the number of nuclear weapons that were targeted at them from sites in Western Europe and Turkey, and they saw the deployment of missiles in Cuba as a way to level the playing field. Another key factor in the Soviet missile scheme was the hostile relationship between the .

High Noon in the Cold War captures the Cuban Missile Crisis in a new light, from inside the hearts and minds of the famous men who provoked and, in the nick of time, resolved the confrontation. Using his personal memories of covering the conflict, and gathering evidence from recent records and new scholarship and testimony, Max Frankel corrects widely held misconceptions about the game of nuclear chicken played by John Kennedy and Nikita Khrushchev in October 1962, when Soviet missiles were secretly planted in Cuba and aimed at the United States.

Description: Author: Max Frankel Publishing: Ballantine Books: New York Year: 2005. Download as PDF or read online from Scribd. Flag for inappropriate content For Later.

HIGH NOON IN THE COLD WAR Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Cuban Missile Crisis. 206 pp. Presidio Press/ Ballantine Books. ENGAGING INDIA Diplomacy, Democracy, and the Bomb. 268 pp. Brookings Institution Press. THE bomb brought peace, but man alone can keep that peace," Winston Churchill observed in August 1945. The bomb has been threatening to start a new war ever since, from Cuba to Kashmir to North Korea. The fear of a mushroom cloud over the Middle East underpinned the justification for war in Iraq.

Frankel is the author of the book High Noon in the Cold War – Kennedy, Khrushchev and the Cuban Missiles Crisis (Ballantine, 2004 and Presidio 2005) and, also, his memoir, The Times of My Life and My Life with the Times (Random House, 1999, and Delta, 2000). Frankel has been married twice. His first wife was Tobia Brown with whom he had three children: David Frankel, Margot Frankel Goldberg, and Jonathan Frankel. She died of a brain tumor at the age of 52 in 1987.

Max Frankel is one of America's preeminent journalists. He won the Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of President Nixon's trip to China in 1972. He wrote the nationally bestselling memoir The Times of My Life and My Life with the Times. Country of Publication.

A Pulitzer Prize-winning Author

One of the giants of American journalism now re-creates an unforgettable time in which the whole world feared extinction. Max Frankel captures the Cuban Missile Crisis in a new light, from inside the hearts and minds of the famous men who provoked and, in the nick of time, resolved the confrontation.

Comments: (7)
Ironfire
Fascinating. Eminently readable. However the used copy I bought was supposedly “Good” but was pretty grubby. I tore the covers off.
Wild Python
By far the best history of the Cuban Missile Crisis I have read. Reads beautifully besides
Gerceytone
Excellent book! Reads like a fiction novel but it is frighteningly true! Max Frankel brings his first hand experience in covering each of these three leaders for the NY Times in the late 1950's and early 1960's, together with the latest information released to the public. His blend of eyewitness account and latest revelations of the facts make for a fascinating read! There are so many myths about the Cuban Missile Crisis which have been accepted as "fact" in these past fifty years. Mr. Frankel updates his readers as to the solid truth. He is a brilliant writer!
Error parents
I lived during that era and now know more than I did then...... history is so important and should not be forgotten
Vathennece
The world came the closest it has ever come to a Nuclear war in 1962. The Cuban Missle crisis makes for dramatic reading. The writing is fast paced and takes you into the meetings and minds of Kennedy and Khrushchev and their top advisors, both civilian and military. It is hard to believe today, but we had senior military men, led by Air Force General Curtis LeMay, who were in favor of attacking Cuba without even giving diplomacy or a naval quarantine a chance. The consequences of that kind of thinking could have been nightmarish.

The discussions in Kennedy's meetings were taped so we know the issues, and the very limited options they had. Tops on their mind was what would be the consequences if the U.S. took out the missles in Cuba by bombing and invasion. Would the Russians attack Berlin where we had only a token allied force? Would that then spark a wider, more deadly confrontation in Europe? What would be the impact on NATO, our allies, and most of all Turkey, where we had missles of our own pointed at Russia? Would the combatants have ultimately resorted to Nuclear weapons ?

This is all international brinksmanship of the highest order. Great History.
Narder
In these days of a proclaimed War on Terror, Frankel reminds us that the past was worse. In this recent recounting of the Cuban missile crisis, many of the facts are already known. But Frankel's narrative points out the myriad ways that disaster could have occurred. With mistakes in perception by both the American and Soviet leaderships.

If anything, John Kennedy's reputation is enhanced. He chose a grimly rational peace, instead of the prospects of a quick military victory in Cuba. Which may well have come about, given the American superiority in conventional forces around Cuba, but which may then have triggered a Soviet nuclear response. Curiously, too, in some ways, Khruschev also comes out of this tale well. Yes, he tried to put one over the Yankees. But ultimately, he also chose peace, even if he foresaw that it might lead to his downfall.
Vudojar
Max Frankel's "High Noon in the Cold War: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Cuban Missile Crisis" is a short, readable account of the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. As the name implies, Frankel focuses on the actions, decisions, and thoughts of the two major players in the crisis - President Kennedy and Premier Khrushchev.

Frankel was a correspondent for the New York Times and reported on the crisis at the time. He had also been posted to Moscow and had many acquaintances in the Soviet government at the time. Frankel used White House recordings of the Executive Committee meetings, the correspondence between Kennedy and Khrushchev, and Sergei Khrushchev's (Nikita's son) memoirs, along with contemporary press accounts, as the basis of his book.

Because the book focuses on the leadership, Frankel doesn't really tell the military story, nor does he delve into the effect of the crisis on the American or Soviet people.

This is a good, short (less than 200 pages), and readable history of the Cuban Missile Crisis. Anyone hoping to get a broad overview of this episode or understand some of the diplomatic maneuvers would enjoy this book. However, this book is far from the definitive story of the Cuban Missile Crisis.