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eBook Do No Evil: Ethics with Applications to Economic Theory and Business download

by Michael Berumen

eBook Do No Evil: Ethics with Applications to Economic Theory and Business download ISBN: 0595657249
Author: Michael Berumen
Publisher: iUniverse, Inc. (July 14, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 494
ePub: 1142 kb
Fb2: 1166 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf lit azw mobi
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

An effective integration of ethics, morality and business practices including extensive discussions of social justice . In Do No Evil, Michael Berumen debunks the notions that moral judgments are subjective preferences and that there are no universal standards of morality.

An effective integration of ethics, morality and business practices including extensive discussions of social justice, animal rights and the environment the author elucidates the many layers of the managerial and corporate environment, deftly analyzing the fiduciary, social and moral relationships between the players in a corporation. A fresh, convincing ethical examination. He analyzes leading normative theories and gives biographical highlights on several important philosophers.

by Michael Berumen (Author). ISBN-13: 978-0595280018.

Being good is not good enough to be moral  . In "Do No Evil," Michael Berumen debunks the notions that moral judgments are subjective preferences and that there ar. Get A Copy.

The last part of the book deals with business-related topics. Berumen has authored articles on various topics, in addition to his book, Do No Evil: Ethics with Applications to Economic Theory and Business

The last part of the book deals with business-related topics. Berumen demonstrates that a business is property and not primarily an instrument for delivering social justice, and he covers such areas as governance, fiduciary responsibility, marketing, globalism, the environment, duties to animals, and moral courage. Berumen has authored articles on various topics, in addition to his book, Do No Evil: Ethics with Applications to Economic Theory and Business. He has also served on various non-profit and for-profit boards.

Being good is not good enough to be moral. In Do No Evil, Michael Berumen debunks the notions that moral judgments are subjective preferences and that there are no universal standards of morality

Being good is not good enough to be moral. Berumen then sets forth his own theory: the only basis for universal morality is the avoidance of death and suffering, in contrast to conventional conceptions of promoting good, which he shows cannot form a basis for universal rules of conduct.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Do No Evil Ethics With Applications to. . See details. See all 2 brand new listings.

In "Do No Evil," Michael Berumen debunks the notions that moral judgments are subjective preferences and that there ar.

Ethics with Applications to Economic Theory and Business. He develops a framework for universal morality in which moral imperatives are–rather than being matters of subjective opinion–immutable. The basis for universal morality, however, must be the avoidance of death and suffering, not just the general pursuit of good–“Being good is not good enough to be moral.

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“An effective integration of ethics, morality and business practices…including extensive discussions of social justice, animal rights and the environment…the author elucidates the many layers of the managerial and corporate environment, deftly analyzing the fiduciary, social and moral relationships between the players in a corporation. A fresh, convincing ethical examination.” —Kirkus Discoveries

Being good is not good enough to be moral. In Do No Evil, Michael Berumen debunks the notions that moral judgments are subjective preferences and that there are no universal standards of morality. He analyzes leading normative theories and gives biographical highlights on several important philosophers. Berumen then sets forth his own theory: the only basis for universal morality is the avoidance of death and suffering, in contrast to conventional conceptions of promoting good, which he shows cannot form a basis for universal rules of conduct.

Berumen then examines the concepts of property, exchange, competition, and inequality, and shows why capitalism occupies the default position of morality, and why socialism is problematic. With that said, he also explains why property rights are not unlimited, and how morality serves to constrain capitalist acts.

The last part of the book deals with business-related topics. Berumen demonstrates that a business is property and not primarily an instrument for delivering social justice, and he covers such areas as governance, fiduciary responsibility, marketing, globalism, the environment, duties to animals, and moral courage.

Comments: (4)
Garne
This excellent volume sets Kant's rationalism on its head and considers the importance of irrationality and the rules rational beings follow in relation to themselves, namely, avoiding death, pain, disability, deception, theft, and violated obligations to oneself. Rational beings (when they are acting rationally) never desire these things for their own sake without a reason. Berumen says universal moral princples can only be based on these rules when we marry them with impartiality, thereby extending them to others. Unlike Kant, he provides concrete rules rather than an empty formula, and, unlike Kant, he does not treat them as absolutes. Rather, it is the exception to them which becomes an absolute, for it must be universalized given the specific universal properties of the relevant facts. Thus, the general moral rules are only tentatively universal insofar as a specific exception cannot be willed. Berumen's chapter on evil, which he defines as death and suffering, is one of the best analyses of the nature of evil I've read. Unlike most proponents of capitalism, Berumen does not justify it on utilitarian grounds, but on the basis that it is wrong to steal or disable another. His chapters on business are interesting and useful, especially the one dealing with the ends or mission of a business. He does not let a business off the moral hook when it is a contributory factor in causing evil, death or suffering, notwithstanding the fact people freely coose to buy its products or work there. With this said, he cautions against using the law as a means of correcting this except in the most greivous cases, for sometimes that causes an even greater moral problem. Berumen's writing is clear and elegant, and his analysis keen. The book is useful for a general audience wanting to know more about ethics and for those who are more philosophically minded. There are typos here and there, but not so many that they get in the way.
Jonide
This is a great book in need of more copyediting with some annoying but minor errors in spelling and such. However, the philosphy is superb... it's an excellent survey of ethics in general and, in particular,it puts forth a sound and useful theory, namely, that moral rules are the impartial extensions of our rational requirements, and that exceptions are prescriptions a la Hare...universal formulations that are logical and take into account the specific facts. The moral rules are built on the prohibitions against death, pain, disability, deception, loss of property, and violation of obligations, and, in general, their importance follows this order, though there are exceptions. Rational beings do not want death or pain for its own sake, without some justification. Morality is the impartial extension of this principle to others, but not just rational beings... to those that can suffer.
I liked his stuff on economics, especially on competetion. Among other things, he shows that competition is not antithetical to cooperation, and that many activities necessarily involve competetion, such that society without it is unthinkable.
The only time competition becomes a moral issue is when competitive behavior violates one of the fundamental moral princples.
The section on business has much to recommend it, particularly the section on the nature of a business, where Berumen shows tht a business is someone's property, not a democratic institution brought by the participants.
Dianantrius
Well written: clear, non-pedantic, and interesting. The idea is that we have certain rational prohibitions to avoid unnecessary harm to ourselves and that this forms the basis of morality. Berumen says there is no rational requirement to be moral towards others; this comes from joining impartiality with our own rational prohibitions, which requires we extend it to everyone else who can suffer or die, with some proportinate formula for other animals. He comes up with a short list of general maxims...don't kill, cause pain, disable, lie, steal, or violate specified duties/obligations. These are not absolute, however, for we can always come up with a case where an exception would be the right thing to do. We can justify such exceptions by applying a Kantian universal, making it apply all of the time to all such situations. Unlike Kant, Berumen will take specific facts and consequencs into account. He then shows how capitalism, or more specifically, private property and free exchange, are allowed by morality, and why collectivism is morally problematic. Less interesting stuff on business (to me) follows, though I am sure it would be valuable to people interested in the practical business side. The exception (to me) are the chapters on business duties towards animals and the environment. One of the better books on ethics, and the first I have read that really takes a hard look at the concepts underlying socialism and capitalism from an ethical standpoint
Timberahue
Do No Evil is written clearly and logically. A lot of philsophy is either too ethereal or too technical. Berumen starts by laying out the nature of ethics, then proceeds to show what we can and cannot justify as universal princples, and applies these ideas to economics and business. Along the way he shows that capitalism is by default the most moral system, but not something whose princples are invioble, for certain macro moral rules have precedence. Longish, but very good.
LeXXXuS
One of the most important points the author makes is that the evil done by an individual or business (the death and suffering it causes) is generally more important than the good works that it performs, that is, unless we can make a specific exception to the rule against causing harm a universal prescription. Thus, a polluter despoiling the environment is not relieved of his moral responsibilities because he donates to other environmental causes.