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by Fyodor Dostoyevsky,Constance Garnett

eBook A Raw Youth (the Adolescent) download ISBN: 1420934082
Author: Fyodor Dostoyevsky,Constance Garnett
Publisher: Digireads.com (January 1, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 366
ePub: 1250 kb
Fb2: 1300 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi azw doc lrf
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Alexei Fyodorovich Karamazov was the third son of a land owner from our district, Fyodor Pavlovich Karamazov, well known is his own day (and still remembered among us) because of his dark and tragic death, which happened exactly thirteen years ago and which I shall speak of in its proper place

Originally, Dostoevsky had created the work under the title "Discord". The novel chronicles the life of 19-year-old intellectual, Arkady Dolgoruky, illegitimate child of the controversial and womanizing landowner Versilov

Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Constance Garnett. Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Adolescent was first published in Russia with the literally translated title of A Raw Youth in 1875, and is presented in Dora O'Brien's new translation by Alma Books.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Constance Garnett.

Translated by Constance Garnett. The Raw Youth or The Adolescent is a novel of Russian writer Fyodor Dostoevsky. It was first published in 1875. The novel chronicles the life of 19-year-old intellectual, Arkady Dolgoruky, illegitimate child of the controversial and womanizing landowner Versilov. A focus of the novel is the recurring conflict between father and son, particularly in ideology, which represents the battles between the conventional "old" way of thinking in the 1840s and the new nihilistic point of view of the youth of 1860s Russia

A Raw Youth (the Adolescent) (Paperback). Fyodor Dostoyevsky (author), Constance Garnett (translator). The Secret Commonwealth: The Book of Dust Volume Two. Philip Pullman.

A Raw Youth (the Adolescent) (Paperback).

Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations) PDF Drive investigated dozens of problems and listed the biggest global.

Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations). 38 MB·735 Downloads·New!. Crime and Punishment (Barnes & Noble Classics). 561 Pages·2007·2 Load more similar PDF files. PDF Drive investigated dozens of problems and listed the biggest global issues facing the world today. Let's Change The World Together. Pdfdrive:hope Give books away.

Перевод: Constance Garnett.

CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 13 сент. Dostoevsky was an innovator, bringing new depth and meaning to the psychological novel and combining realism and philosophical speculation in his complex studies of the human condition. Перевод: Constance Garnett. CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2014. A Raw Youth (The Adolescent)" is Fyodor Dostoyevsky's 1875 novel which tells the story of the life of a 19-year-old intellectual, Arkady Dolgoruky, who is the illegitimate child of the controversial and womanizing landowner Versilov. The novel focuses primarily on the conflict that arises between Arkady and Versilov, when Arkady rejoins his family in St. Petersburg. Arkady who has been away at boarding school hardly knows his family and when he comes to learn more about them he becomes embroiled in the scandalous affairs of his father.

"A Raw Youth (The Adolescent)" is Fyodor Dostoyevsky's 1875 novel which tells the story of the life of a 19-year-old intellectual, Arkady Dolgoruky, who is the illegitimate child of the controversial and womanizing landowner Versilov. The novel focuses primarily on the conflict that arises between Arkady and Versilov, when Arkady rejoins his family in St. Petersburg. Arkady who has been away at boarding school hardly knows his family and when he comes to learn more about them he becomes embroiled in the scandalous affairs of his father. Rich with the depictions of the complex psychological, emotional, and moral conflicts that plague the human condition and are so common to the characters of Dostoyevsky's work, "A Raw Youth (The Adolescent)" is a classic work by an author who many consider as the greatest to ever have lived.
Comments: (7)
Trash Obsession
Having read (and loved) all of Dostoevsky's other major works, I was a little reluctant to begin what seemed to be his universally least-acclaimed novel. I was pleasantly surprised, then, to find that A Raw Youth (I realize that this book goes by two titles, but "The Adolescent" does not seem accurate as the protagonist is significantly older than an adolescent) is definitely Dostoevsky.

Of course, with Dostoevsky, you get convoluted plots and bits of melodrama. Anyone who has read Dostoevsky should be fully prepared and accepting of this fact. While I would not rank this novel as highly as I would Dostoevsky's great works (which, to me, are The Brothers Karamazov and The Idiot), I think it is worth being considered alongside The Possessed and Crime and Punishment.

A quirk, however, that was a little disappointing: Dostoevsky used the final few pages of this novel to essentially produce a diatribe/essay as to the future of the Russian novel. It was out-of-place and would have been better elaborated on as its own separate essay, as its presence weakened the dramatic tension of the final pages. Nevertheless, this was a minor disappointment that really does not greatly weaken the impact of the rest of the novel.

Now, a quick note as to the format -- I was overall very pleased with this Kindle version. There were very few mistakes, and the text fit the Kindle page nicely. There was one thing that was slightly annoying (and that has been present in every low-priced Dostoevsky work I have read through Kindle). Dostoevsky had a habit of occasionally having characters speak in French. For these occasions, a translation is sorely needed. This problem is not nearly as prevalent here as it was in The Possessed (where one character OFTEN speaks in French), but it is still a distraction.
Samulkis
Not as highly rated as his 'classic' novels but if you enjoy those you will enjoy this as well. Has all the usual things that you expect in a book by the dark russian and for me that is more than enough.
Gralinda
What an insight into human development. Although, a niteenth century story, it seems, excluding the externals, not much has changed.
Frosha
can't go wrong with Dostoyevsky!
Doukasa
sorry for previous review; the translation is a classic Constance Garnett translation and is fine indeed; but this cheap paperback is over 50 years old and quite fragile; I'd look for a more recent book even if by same translator; obviously the book itself is fantastic but I'm writing review for this edition
lolike
A Raw Youth, also translated as The Adolescent, came after all of Fyodor Dostoevsky's great novels except his masterpiece The Brothers Karamazov yet has long been considered minor. Indeed, it not only failed to enter the world canon but had long been hard to find in English before this recent translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, the Russian to English translators now most in vogue. Pevear's Introduction seems determined to rescue the book from the critical gutter; he has legitimate points and argues well but is not quite convincing, though he and his wife did at least succeed in getting renewed readership. In the view of this long-time Dostoevsky fan, the novel does deserve more readers and acclaim but is clearly below his major work. Fans will of course want it, as his genius was simply too great to be held back, and those not normally fond of him may be pleasantly surprised by this generally uncharacteristic work.

The novel is essentially a bildungsroman and is quite successful on this front - is indeed one of the popular genre's most underrated entries. Even its many critics have long praised its believably detailed and forcefully presented picture of adolescence, and Arkady, the troubled nineteen-year-old intellectual protagonist, has particular verisimilitude. It has often been said that this was the most convincing adolescence depiction before The Catcher in the Rye, which is truly high praise. Arkady was a more or less representative young Russian male, and many initial readers no doubt found him very relatable. However, since so much of adolescence is universal, his experience still speaks to many across decades and cultures; few cannot relate to his doubts and uncertainties, and even fewer will be unable to sympathize. He is essentially like any young man struggling to find an identity and place in the world. That he is not put on a pedestal makes him easy to relate to and gives much of his appeal. Arkady has many conventionally admirable qualities, not least intelligence and ambition, but is also often impulsive and reckless in a way very familiar to anyone who has dealt with promising but undisciplined youth. However, he learns much in the course of the book and comes to a sort of equilibrium after the dramatic climax, rounding out the classic bildungsroman pattern. That Dostoevsky was able to write all this so plausibly despite being well past middle age and not having such an upbringing himself is a true testament to his artistry.

Many will see the similarities between Arkady and Crime and Punishment's more famous Raskolnikov, and the book is in many ways a less serious version of Crime. Like that novel, it is highly influenced by Ivan Turgenev's Fathers and Sons, particularly its dramatization of the intellectual conflict and larger generation gap between Arkady and his father. They symbolize their generations, making the discussion relevant to Russia in a larger sense. This is now of course mostly of historical interest, but associated domestic issues like responsibility of fathers toward children will surely always be relevant and also hinted at what was to come in The Brothers.

The weakness is primarily in the plot - or lack of one. The bildungsroman format gives a framework of sorts, but much of the action is essentially episodic, which is fine with some but rankles many. Execution is also less than deft, with an overreliance on coincidences, chance meetings, etc. Above all, though, much of what happens is simply uninteresting in itself, though Arkady's thoughts and the greater significance usually make it worthwhile. Finally, the more conventionally exciting bits - e.g., the mysterious letter - are so highly wrought as to be melodramatic. It is very possible that this is intentional - Dostoevsky's way of showing Arkady's, and thus youth's, exaggerated self-absorption -, but most will be unconvinced as to its artistry.

As all this suggests, the novel is considerably less serious than usual. There is a certain lightness to much of the material and significantly more humor than one would expect - though, being Dostoevsky, the humor is very black. This may disappoint some fans but could well be a surprising delight to others, while it is one of several factors that could attract those usually averse to Dostoevsky. Less debatable is the lack of philosophical dramatization that is one of his hallmarks; this certainly does not tackle the weighty issues of thought and theology that his best works do. His other hallmark - psychological perspicuity - is here in full force, which atones to a large degree, but it is hard not to miss the heavier elements.

All told, anyone who likes Dostoevsky should read this, though all his major works should be read first, while those who have read a novel or two and not been particularly thrilled may wish to skip to it.
Delan
This was the first of the books by Dostoyevsky that I ever read and I was captivated by it. I can't say that it makes the most sense and that everything gets tied up in the end (some parts don't seem to have anything to do with the story), but it was written so well and the characters were so real that I loved it. It's about a young man, Arkady, whose legal father is a man he doesn't know and his biological father, Versilov, is someone he doesn't know how to deal with. Arkady ends up getting a very important document that many people want from him and the plot revolves around what he does with it. He hates his father, but desperately wants to feel loved by him at the same time. The book is very long and many times confusing, with a strange ending, but it's a classic work, because it has so much to say about death, love, jealously, and family. If you like strange books and literature and are willing to plod through the rough parts of it, it will be worth it.