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by Gordon S. Wood

eBook The Purpose of the Past: Reflections on the Uses of History download ISBN: 1594201544
Author: Gordon S. Wood
Publisher: Penguin Press HC, The (March 13, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 323
ePub: 1936 kb
Fb2: 1784 kb
Rating: 4.3
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Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Gordon S. Wood is the Alva O. Way University Professor and professor of history emeritus at Brown University

Gordon S. Way University Professor and professor of history emeritus at Brown University. His 1969 book, The Creation of the American Republic, 1776–1787, received the Bancroft and John H. Dunning prizes and was nominated for the National Book Award. Wood’s 1992 book, The Radicalism of the American Revolution, won the Pulitzer Prize and the Emerson Prize.

Start by marking The Purpose of the Past: Reflections . gordon wood is the greatest living historian and one of the top living essayists

Start by marking The Purpose of the Past: Reflections on the Uses of History as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. His book serves as both a history of American history-neither wholly a celebration nor a critique-and an argument for its ongoing necessity. These are both the best of times and the worst of times for American history. gordon wood is the greatest living historian and one of the top living essayists.

In The Purpose of the Past, historian Gordon S. Wood examines this sea change in. .A commanding assessment of the field by one of its masters, The Purpose of the Past will enlarge every reader's capacity to appreciate history. Wood examines this sea change in his field through consideration of some of its most important historians and their works. He offers wonderful insight into what great historians do, how they can stumble, and what strains of thought have dominated the marketplace of ideas in historical scholarship. Attn: Author/Narrator If you have any queries please contact me at info19782 @ gmail. I will reply as soon as possible, usually within 24 hours.

Gordon Wood is one of America's most distinguished historians. He is best known for his Creation of the American Republic, 1776–1787 (University of North Carolina Press, 1969) a study that controversially claimed to find a communal, "republican" system of ideas, not classical liberalism, at the heart of the American Revolution.

Gordon S. His 2009 book, Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815, won the New-York Historical Society American History Book Prize. In 2011, Wood was awarded a National Humanities Medal by President Obama.

Gordon Wood on the Art of American History. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 11 years ago.

However, it is focused on one great shortcoming amongst historians, and one that is almost impossible to transcend: reading the present into the past. Gordon Wood wants historicans to take the past as the past-no more no less. He does not see the study of history as a guide for avoiding the mistakes of the past. Gordon Wood on the Art of American History.

Gordon Stewart Wood (born November 27, 1933) is an American historian and university professor at Brown University. The Purpose of the Past: Reflections on the Uses of History, Penguin Press (New York), 2008. ISBN 978-0143115045). He is a recipient of the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for History for The Radicalism of the American Revolution (1992). His book The Creation of the American Republic, 1776–1787 (1969) won a 1970 Bancroft Prize. In 2010, he was awarded the National Humanities Medal. Empire of Liberty: A History of the Early Republic, 1789–1815, Oxford University Press (New York), 2010. ISBN 978-0199832460).

MORE BY Walter Russell Mead. September/October 2008. The Purpose of the Past: Reflections on the Uses of History.

Historian Gordon Wood talked about his book The Purpose of the Past: Reflections on the Uses of History, published by Penguin Press. Historian Gordon Wood talked about his book The Purpose of the Past: Reflections on the Uses of History, published by Penguin Press. Your purchase helps support C-SPAN.

An analysis of the practice and art of historical documentation evaluates the contributions of some of the world's most important historians, explaining how the modern world is requiring key changes to the discipline of recording history. 30,000 first printing.
Comments: (7)
Boyn
I really liked this book and its premise/purpose. As a prolific reviewer of history works for over 30 years now, Mr. Wood has some well-defined opinions and perspectives about how history writing has varied over the years. Rather than lecturing us, he just submits 21 reviews that he wrote from the late 1980s until the early 2000s. I had read a handful of the books he reviewed and so was interested in what he thought about them from his perch as one of the premier experts in American History and a prolific writer himself. I appreciated as well his "Afterword" after each review. He also reviewed works that I have heard about and have had some interest in, which either renewed my interest in reading them or totally extinguished it.

My only knock is that this is not a book one sits down to ready by the fire for three hours. The 21 reviews are all different and after a while, a little taxing on someone like me, a serious amateur American history fan. Some of the points he made I think would be easily grasped and understood by practicing historians, but I frankly missed some.

I do highly recommend it, especially in these days of authors trying to impose today's mores and values to people doing the best they could in, say, 1787.
Cordabor
I found this to be just an extremely valuable collection of essays by Gordon S. Wood, one of our leading historians of the colonial and early national period (see his "The Creation of the American Republic" among other studies), consisting of 21 of his review essays. These essays originally appeared in the New York Review of Books, the New Republic, or the Atlantic between 1981-2007. The book's impact derives from several considerations. First, it is Wood who is writing the reviews, with tempered judgment (for the most part) and unimpeachable command of the material. Second, what Wood is up to is to illustrate trends or approaches in writing American history, as demonstrated in the various books under review.

Some of the approaches or "trends" that Wood discusses, sometimes quite critically, include influence in intellectual history; writing history from the perspective of "contemporary consciousness"; is there still a place for good narrative history?; is the "new historicism" correct that everything is relative?; can history be written as fiction (Schama's "Dead Certainties" the subject of review); microhistory; multicultural history; comparative history; postmodern history; history and myth; and "presentism." His authors include Gary Wills; Joyce Appleby; Elkin & McKitrick; Gary Nash; Jon Butler; Jill Lapore; Pauline Maier and many others. If Wood had written a straight substantive article on trends in history, the reader's eyes might become glazed over. But the device of introducing and discussing (and sometimes deconstructing) each approach within the framework of reviewing a book manifesting that approach, keeps things much more interesting and lively than one might expect. Wood also has included a useful introductory essay and an index. So the book is a fun way to learn an awful lot about the writing of American history in this country during the last quarter century or so.
X-MEN
This book was purchased without any knowledge of the contents. I've read several of Woods' books and had yet to be disappointed. It was assumed that The Purpose of the Past, like the others, would be great. Upon receipt of the book I was disappointed that it was a book of book reviews. But after reading it, I couldn't be more satisfied. Wood provides the reader with an awesome introduction followed by selected book reviews over the past few decades.

In the introduction, he gives the reader a lesson on the evolution of historical theory and study over past half century. It's metamorphosis from a sweeping narrative story presented from the perspective of notable participants to a specialized acute microhistory of an event or group that dissected and studied as a science (often times historical topics are broken down by an academic subject - race, gender, economics, religious sect, profession, etc - and studied statistically). He explains the purpose for history and uses his past book reviews to warn the reader to watch out for anachronism, political theory, and the potential misuse of history to make a point. The lessons provided in this book are invaluable for the historian (or lay reader of history books), and Wood, an awesome authority on Early American and Atlantic History in his own rite, inadvertently recommends other books through his agreeable several agreeable reviews.
Kulasius
I found this a strange book, obviously written by a highly skilled and erudite historian of very high repute, which points out the many and varied ways of defining, writing and interpreting history. The general point is that, as a human view of human events, every historian suffers inescapably from bias in that he unavoidably sees it from his own personal point of view. In particular, although human historical development cannot properly be judged on moral or ethical aspects, most of us see history from a goodies-and-baddies view point and can't help taking sides, which makes it very difficult to write or read history without bias. One of the things to which he refers which I found troubling is the apparently modern practice of seeing history from a politically-correct or even worse from a marxist or left-wing political point of view, The fact that Winston Churchill lead the allies against Hitler doesn't mean hi did it on his own. Professor Wood gives a very interesting and readable description of all the different ways of writing history. He also discusses the question of whether history is a chronicle of random events or whether there is some underlying-principle involved.