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eBook The Battle of Berlin 1945 download

by Tony Le Tissier

eBook The Battle of Berlin 1945 download ISBN: 0312016042
Author: Tony Le Tissier
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (October 1, 1988)
Language: English
Pages: 290
ePub: 1222 kb
Fb2: 1719 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit lrf lit mbr
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

The Battle of Berlin was a conflict of unprecedented scale.

The Battle of Berlin was a conflict of unprecedented scale. The Soviets massed 1,600,000 troops for Operation Berlin, and but Marshal Zhukov's his initial attack floundered and was so costly that he had to revise his plans for taking of the city when Stalin allowed his rival, Marshal Koniev, to intervene. The fight for Berlin thus became a contest for the prize of the Reichstag, fought in the sea of rubble left by Allied aerial bombardments, now reduced further by the mass of Soviet siege artillery.

Le Tissier is straightforward and largely presents a sterile acccount thereby missing the need to communicate the apocalyptic atmosphere which represented Berlin in 1945. Something Le Tissier does well is relating how confusing the Nazi organization was along with the breakdown in communications amongst the disparate and disappearing forces

List of Maps and Illustrations. The follow through to Berlin consequently involved considerable readjustment to the plan of battle as the exhausted infantry struggled to keep up with the advancing armour.

List of Maps and Illustrations. Meanwhile, unknown to Zhukov, Stalin had permitted Koniev to intrude on the Berlin battlefield with his 3rd and 4th Guards Tank Armies. Stalin further banned the Red Air Force from informing Zhukov of Koniev’s participation, while the latter urged his forces to beat his rival into Berlin.

With our backs to berlin. The German Army in Retreat. In 1945 Erich Wittor was a 20-year-old second lieutenant of three months’ standing, leading a squadron in the Armoured Reconnaissance Battalion ‘Kurmark’, commanded by Major Freiherr von Albedyll, only son of the squire of Klessin (see The Siege of Klessin). The Panzergrenadier Division ‘Kurmark’, to which his unit belonged, had yet to be fully formed on the basis of the Panzergrenadier Replacement Brigade of the famous Division ‘Grossdeutschland’.

During many years working in senior official positions in Berlin Tony Le Tissier accumulated a vast knowledge of the campaign the led up to the fall of the city in 1945.

Among the soldiers of the Red Army, Berlin and the Reichstag in particular - was seen as the victor's prize. Stalin had promised Berlin to Marshal Zhukov, but the latter's blundering in the preliminary battle forced a dramatic change of plan. During many years working in senior official positions in Berlin Tony Le Tissier accumulated a vast knowledge of the campaign the led up to the fall of the city in 1945.

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Author: Tony Le Tissier. Author: Tony Le Tissier. Publisher: The History Press, Stroud, 2013. In the final months of the Second World War in 1945, the German Army was in full retreat on both its Western and Eastern Fronts.

The Battle of Berlin, designated the Berlin Strategic Offensive Operation by the Soviet Union, and also known as the Fall of Berlin, was one of the last major offensives of the European theatre of World War II. Following the Vistula–Oder Offensive o. . Following the Vistula–Oder Offensive of January–February 1945, the Red Army had temporarily halted on a line 60 km (37 mi) east of Berlin. On 9 March, Germany established its defence plan for the city with Operation Clausewitz.

The Battle of Berlin was a conflict of unprecedented scale

The Battle of Berlin was a conflict of unprecedented scale.

The battle of Berlin was truly a battle on an unprecedented scale. The Soviets massed 1,600,000 troops for 'Operation Berlin', and Marshal Zhukov in the centre had half of them, but his initial attack floundered, lasting four days instead of one, and was so costly that he had to revise his plans for taking of the city, and to revise them yet again when Stalin allowed his rival, Marshal Koniev, to intervene. The battle for Berlin thus became a contest for the prize of the Reichstag, fought in the sea of rubble left by Allied aerial bombardments, now reduced further by the mass of Soviet siege artillery. Meanwhile, Hitler and his courtiers sought to continue the struggle in the totally unrealistic atmosphere that prevailed in his bunker, while soldiers and civilians alike suffered and perished unheeded all around them...
Comments: (2)
Shalinrad
The final battle in WW2 continues to fascinate me (and many others). This account from Le Tissier, first published in 1987, is a decent contribution but does not offer too much in the way of new material or analysis. It is a capable effort to be sure but Ryan's Last Battle published 20 years earlier is still a benchmark and Beevor's The Fall of Berlin 1945, the new standard.

Not that the facts are lacking in Le Tissier's work. In fact, they are stark and compelling it is just that he has a dry style while the two other works bring the history to life in terms of writing style, first person accounts, and their own informed views. Le Tissier is straightforward and largely presents a sterile acccount thereby missing the need to communicate the apocalyptic atmosphere which represented Berlin in 1945.

The battle's statistics are staggering: over 300,000 Soviet dead (more recent work like Beevor's peg it at 250,000) and they awarded over 1 million medals for the capture of Berlin demonstrating the size of their attacking force. Something Le Tissier does well is relating how confusing the Nazi organization was along with the breakdown in communications amongst the disparate and disappearing forces. The book also contained photographs I had not seen before which was great but the maps require patience and perhaps a military background. So well researched but not well written is my conclusion.
Foginn
It just isn't that well written. Errors are hard to spot since the tenses change almost at random and the narrative whipsaws from the German to the Russian views and back again without warning.