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eBook NATO 1948: The Birth of the Transatlantic Alliance download

by Lawrence S. Kaplan

eBook NATO 1948: The Birth of the Transatlantic Alliance download ISBN: 0742539164
Author: Lawrence S. Kaplan
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (June 21, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 286
ePub: 1463 kb
Fb2: 1647 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: rtf mobi lrf mbr
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

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Larry Kaplan’s book brings back to life the unique period in 1948–1949 that witnessed the birth of America’s first 'entangling alliance. His is an exceptionally lively, richly documented, and always enthralling study of the events that led to the greatest transformation of American diplomacy, of the men who made it happen, and of the challenges they had to overcome. The relationship between the United States and Europe has suffered in recent.

Lawrence S. Kaplan, the leading historian of NATO, traces the tortuous and dramatic process, which struggled to reconcile the conflicting concerns on the part of the future partners. Although the allies could agree on the need to cope with the threat of Soviet-led Communism and on the vital importance of an American association with a unified Europe, they differed over the means of achieving these ends.

Larry Kaplan’s book brings back to life the unique period in 1948–1949 that witnessed the birth of America’s first .

This compelling history brings to life the watershed year of 1948, when the United States reversed its long-standing position of political and military isolation from Europe and agreed to an "entangling alliance" with ten European nations. The historic North Atlantic Treaty was signed on April 4, 1949, but the often-contentious negotiations stretched throughout the preceding year. Lawrence S. Kaplan, the leading historian of NATO, traces the tortuous and dramatic process, which struggled to reconcile the conflicting concerns on the part of the future partners

The historic North Atlantic Treaty was signed on April 4, 1949, but the often-contentious negotiations stretched throughout the preceding year.

The historic North Atlantic Treaty was signed on April 4, 1949, but the often-contentious negotiations stretched throughout the preceding year. He brings to life the colorful diplomats and politicians arrayed on both sides of the debate.

The historic North Atlantic Treaty was signed on April 4, 1949, but the often- contentious negotiations stretched throughout the .

The historic North Atlantic Treaty was signed on April 4, 1949, but the often- contentious negotiations stretched throughout the preceding year.

This compelling history brings to life the watershed year of 1948, when the United States reversed its long-standing position of political and military isolation from Europe and agreed to an "entangling alliance" with ten European nations. Not since 1800, when the United States ended its alliance with France, had the nation made such a commitment.

This compelling history brings to life the watershed year of 1948, when the United States reversed its long-standing position of political and military isolation from Europe and agreed to an "entangling alliance" with ten European nations. Not since 1800, when the United States ended its alliance with France, had the nation made such a commitment. The historic North Atlantic Treaty was signed on April 4, 1949, but the often-contentious negotiations stretched throughout the preceding year. Lawrence S. Kaplan, the leading historian of NATO, traces the tortuous and dramatic process, which struggled to reconcile the conflicting concerns on the part of the future partners. Although the allies could agree on the need to cope with the threat of Soviet-led Communism and on the vital importance of an American association with a unified Europe, they differed over the means of achieving these ends. The United States had to contend with domestic isolationist suspicions of Old World intentions, the military's worries about over extension of the nation's resources, and the apparent incompatibility of the projected treaty with the UN charter. For their part, Europeans had to be convinced that American demands to abandon their traditions would provide the sense of security that economic and political recovery from World War II required. Kaplan brings to life the colorful diplomats and politicians arrayed on both sides of the debate. The end result was a remarkably durable treaty and alliance that has linked the fortunes of America and Europe for over fifty years. Despite differences that have persisted and occasionally flared over the past fifty years, NATO continues to bind America and Europe in the twenty-first century. Kaplan's detailed and lively account draws on a wealth of primary sources—newspapers, memoirs, and diplomatic documents—to illuminate how the United States came to assume international obligations it had scrupulously avoided for the previous 150 years.
Comments: (3)
Kanal
NATO, to the Defense establishment-minded means North Atlantic Treaty Organization. But if you you live in the United States, own a movie theatre or produce commercial films, you might define NATO as the National Association of Theatre Owners. If you are Mr. Sumner Redstone, you are thinking of the latter. If you are Dr. Lawrence Kaplan or Mr. Morris Honick, you are thinking of the former.
You probably won't belive me, but really....I know all three. As a young man in school in the late 1960's, I worked for Sumner Redstone and his brother Eddy Redstone in Boston, MA when they opened the Cleveland Circle Theatre & showcase Cinema. Sumner is a past president of NATO.
I joined the USAF and for 19 of my 24 years on active duty, I was an AFRTS broadcaster. One of my assignments was AFN Shape at Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers, Europe at Mons, Belgium. Morris Honick is a friend of mine. He was the long-time head of the Historical Section of SHAPE Headquarters for over 30 years. He introduced me to his associate, Dr. Lawrence Kaplan, director of the Lemnitzer Center for NATO Studies at Kent State University. I conducted radio interviews with both men. Between them, I can't think of 2 more knowledgable men who have a better grasp or understanding of what this great global alliance is all about. They know how it came about, how it functions and how is fosters cohession, friendship and mutual trust among some of the great nations in the world we live in today. The book they have written is a repository of knowledge and understanding that formed the great compromise that has blossumed into the primer defense organization that is NATO today, from its early beginnings over 60 years ago to what it has become.
Vishura
Outstanding text by Professor Kaplan who graciously takes note of his assistant and my older brother Morris Honick
Wooden Purple Romeo
THE BETTER BOOK ABOUT THE OTAN ORIGINS.