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eBook Managing African Portugal: The Citizen-Migrant Distinction download

by Kesha Fikes

eBook Managing African Portugal: The Citizen-Migrant Distinction download ISBN: 0822345129
Author: Kesha Fikes
Publisher: Duke University Press Books (November 17, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 224
ePub: 1908 kb
Fb2: 1336 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: docx lit lrf doc
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

In Managing African Portugal, Kesha Fikes shows how the final i. .Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Managing African Portugal: The Citizen-Migrant Distinction as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In Managing African Portugal, Kesha Fikes shows how the final i.

Keywords: African Portugal, Managing African, Fikes, citizen, Kesha No, Migrant Distinction.

MANAGING AFRICAN PORTUGAL The Citizen-Migrant Distinction Kesha Fikes Duke University .

MANAGING AFRICAN PORTUGAL The Citizen-Migrant Distinction Kesha Fikes Duke University PreSs Durham and London 200 9 for Brenda 2009 Duke University Press All rights reserved. Managing African Portugal details how people lived these shifts through immediate engage ments with their other, for citizen and migrant alike. Everyone felt the effects of integration.

Read "Managing African Portugal The Citizen-Migrant Distinction" by Kesha .

Afroamerican and African Studies, Department of (DAAS).

Managing African Portugal. the citizen-migrant distinction. Black magik women : policing appearances. Being in place : domesticating the citizen-migrant distinction. Regulating the citizen, disciplining the migrant.

In Managing African Portugal, Kesha Fikes shows how the final integration of Portugal’s economic institutions into the European Union (EU) in the late 1990s changed everyday encounters between African migrants and Portuguese citizens. This economic transition is examined through transformations in ideologies of difference enacted in workspaces in Lisbon between the mid-1990s and the early 2000s. Fikes evaluates shifts in racial discourse and considers how both antiracism and racism instantiate proof of Portugal’s European conversion and modernization.

Managing African Portugal: The Citizen-Migrant Distinction (e-Duke books scholarly collection. Audible Download Audio Books. AudiobookStand Discount Audiobooks on Disc. Book Depository Books With Free Delivery Worldwide.

In Managing African Portugal, Kesha Fikes shows how the final integration of Portugal’s economic institutions into the European Union (EU) in the late 1990s changed everyday encounters between African migrants and Portuguese citizens. This economic transition is examined through transformations in ideologies of difference enacted in workspaces in Lisbon between the mid-1990s and the early 2000s. Fikes evaluates shifts in racial discourse and considers how both antiracism and racism instantiate proof of Portugal’s European “conversion” and modernization.

The ethnographic focus is a former undocumented fish market that at one time employed both Portuguese and Cape Verdean women. Both groups eventually sought work in low-wage professions as maids, nannies, and restaurant-kitchen help. The visibility of poor Portuguese women as domestics was thought to undermine the appearance of Portuguese modernity; by contrast, the association of poor African women with domestic work confirmed it. Fikes argues that we can better understand how Portugal interpreted its economic absorption into the EU by attending to the different directions in which working-poor Portuguese and Cape Verdean women were routed in the mid-1990s and by observing the character of the new work relationships that developed among them. In Managing African Portugal, Fikes pushes for a study of migrant phenomena that considers not only how the enactment of citizenship by the citizen manages the migrant, but also how citizens are simultaneously governed through their uptake and assumption of new EU citizen roles.

Comments: (3)
Mr_NiCkNaMe
In Managing African Portugal, anthropologist Kesha Fikes conducts an ethnographic study of the effects of Portugal’s entry into the European Union on the lives of African women from former Portuguese colonies living in Portugal. The book goes beyond an examination of race perceptions in Portugal. Fikes’ thesis is also helpful as it relates to understanding post-colonial transitions, regionalism and nationalism and liberalism and neo-liberalism. The latter has a number of implications for racism and economic suppression, despite the tendency for neo-liberalism to be discussed in post-racial terms (e.g. the model of homo-oeconomicus implies a post-racial subject judged only by her economic value). Fikes’ intervention regarding the racialization that is a part of how neo-liberalism is practiced (if not theorized) is important here.
Throw her heart
amazing.
Fordredor
What is so original and imaginative about Managing African Portugal is that it captures the complex dynamics of citizenship and migrant-making under one analytic frame. Citizens and migrants are, according to Kesha Fikes, always locked into an intimate, awkward embrace - an embrace that paradoxically allows for the often violent distancing of one from the other. While the migrant serves as a catalyst for Portugal's "modernity" as well as Portuguese "whiteness" and "middle-classness", the emergent category of the Portuguese "European" fixes and traps the increasingly racialized and classed bodies and practices of migrants. Yet this book is more than a story about "marginal" Europe and its racisms in an age of political correctness. It is, more broadly, a story about citizenship as something that must be achieved on an every-day basis, and as something that comes to light through both banal everyday encounters with Europe's Others as well as through the violence of the police. It is thus also a story about the state, whose differentially violent operations orchestrate distinctions between newly emergent categories of people, making them legible to each other. In Fikes's narrative, the migrant and the citizen emerge not as stable categories, but as positionings within a long, complex, and ever-changing relationship mediated by the purportedly anti-racist state - the result of which has been the inscription and stabilization of difference along racial, classed, and spatial axes. This is, in sum, an intensely thoughtful book that is theoretically dense and yet accessible, ethnographically moving and thus also extremely teachable. I highly recommend it to those interested in reading and teaching about citizenship, migrancy, racism and the state in Europe and beyond.