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eBook Civilising Subjects: Metropole and Colony in the English Imagination 1830-1867 download

by Catherine Hall

eBook Civilising Subjects: Metropole and Colony in the English Imagination 1830-1867 download ISBN: 0226313344
Author: Catherine Hall
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (May 1, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 556
ePub: 1859 kb
Fb2: 1307 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: txt mobi rtf lit
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

The book Civilising Subjects . life Morant Bay and after Part II - Metropolis, Colony and Empire Mapping the Midland Metropolis . .

The book Civilising Subjects: Metropole and Colony in the English Imagination 1830-1867, Catherine Hall is published by University of Chicago Press.

Civilising Subjects book. Hall uses the stories of two groups of Englishmen and -women to explore British self-constructions both in the colonies and at home. In Jamaica, a group of Baptist missionaries hoped to make African-Jamaicans into people like themselves, only to be disappointed when the project proved neither simple nor congenial to the black men and women for whom they hoped to fashion new selves.

How did the English get to be English? In Civilising Subjects, Catherine Hall argues that the idea of empire was at.

And in Birmingham, abolitionist enthusiasm dominated the city in the 1830s, but by the 1860s, a harsher racial vocabulary reflected a new perception of the nonwhite subjects of empire as different kinds of men from the "manly citizens" of Birmingham.

In Civilising Subjects, Catherine Hall argues that the idea of empire was at the heart of.

Hall uses the stories of two groups of Englishmen and -women to explore British self-constructions both in the colonies and at home.

Catherine Hall FBA (born 1946 in Kettering) is a British feminist historian. Civilising Subjects: Metropole And Colony In The English Imagination, 1830-1867 (2002). She is the daughter of John, a Baptist minister, and Gladys, who came from a family of millers. Since 2009, she has been Professor of Modern British Social and Cultural History at University College London. Her work explores the interrelation between metropole and colony in an attempt to rewrite the narrative of certain aspects of 'British history' in the mid-nineteenth century empire period.

Civilising Subjects argues that the empire was at the heart of.Catherine Hall is Professor of Modern British Social and Cultural History at University College, London.

Civilising Subjects argues that the empire was at the heart of nineteenth-century Englishness. English men and women in the mid-nineteenth century imagined themselves at the centre of a great empire: their mental and emotional maps encompassed 'Aborigines' in Australia, 'negroes' in Jamaica, 'coolies' in the Indies. Abolitionist enthusiasm dominated the town in the 1830s but by the 1860s the identity of 'friend of the negro' had been superseded by a harsher racial vocabulary.

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Winner of the Morris D. Forkasch prize for the best book in British history 2002 Civilising Subjects argues that the empire was at the heart of nineteenth-century Englishness

Winner of the Morris D. Forkasch prize for the best book in British history 2002 Civilising Subjects argues that the empire was at the heart of nineteenth-century Englishness. English men and women in the mid-nineteenth century imagined themselves at the centre of a great empire: their mental and emotional maps encompassed a Aboriginesa in Australia, a negroesa in Jamaica, a cooliesa in the Indies. This sense of the other provided boundaries and markers of difference: ways of knowing who was a civiliseda and who was a savagea

82 C. Hall, Civilising Subjects: Metropole and Colony in the English Imagination, 1830–1867 (Oxford, 2002); Hall, McClelland, and Rendall, Defi ning the Victorian Nation, p. 51. For additional discussion of Hall’s use of Fanon, see Catherine Hall, Simon Gikandi, Thomas C. Holt and Philippa Levine, ‘Discussion: Civilising Subjects: Metropole and Colony in the English Imagination, 1830–1867’, Journal of British Studies, 42 (2003), pp. 505–29.

How did the English get to be English? In Civilising Subjects, Catherine Hall argues that the idea of empire was at the heart of mid-nineteenth-century British self-imagining, with peoples such as the "Aborigines" in Australia and the "negroes" in Jamaica serving as markers of difference separating "civilised" English from "savage" others.Hall uses the stories of two groups of Englishmen and -women to explore British self-constructions both in the colonies and at home. In Jamaica, a group of Baptist missionaries hoped to make African-Jamaicans into people like themselves, only to be disappointed when the project proved neither simple nor congenial to the black men and women for whom they hoped to fashion new selves. And in Birmingham, abolitionist enthusiasm dominated the city in the 1830s, but by the 1860s, a harsher racial vocabulary reflected a new perception of the nonwhite subjects of empire as different kinds of men from the "manly citizens" of Birmingham.This absorbing study of the "racing" of Englishness will be invaluable for imperial and cultural historians.