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eBook German Orientalism in the Age of Empire: Religion, Race, and Scholarship (Publications of the German Historical Institute) download

by Suzanne L. Marchand

eBook German Orientalism in the Age of Empire: Religion, Race, and Scholarship (Publications of the German Historical Institute) download ISBN: 0521169070
Author: Suzanne L. Marchand
Publisher: Cambridge University Press; Reprint edition (August 9, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 562
ePub: 1890 kb
Fb2: 1237 kb
Rating: 4.6
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Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Suzanne Marchand's enormously learned, contextually rich, and conceptually complex study of the scholarly traditions and cultural practices that defined the 'peculiarities' of German Orientalism in the modern Imperial age finally provides a comprehensive, convincing response to questions.

Suzanne Marchand's enormously learned, contextually rich, and conceptually complex study of the scholarly traditions and cultural practices that defined the 'peculiarities' of German Orientalism in the modern Imperial age finally provides a comprehensive, convincing response to questions that historians of modern Germany have been asking since the publication of Edward Said's Orientalism more than thirty years ago. But her book does more than simply fill a gap in historical scholarship or supplement existing paradigms of analysis

In ranging across the subdisciplines of Orientalistik, German Orientalism in the Age of Empire introduces readers to a host of iconoclastic characters and forgotten debates, seeking to demonstrate both the richness of this intriguing field and its indebtedness to the cultural world.

Discover more publications, questions and projects in Orientalism. Narratives of Diversity: Migrant Historiography in Britain, Germany and Sweden, 1970s-1990s.

In 2010, Marchand received the American Historical Association's George L. Mosse Prize for the Best Book in Cultural and Intellectual History for German Orientalism in the Age of Empire: Religion, Race, and Scholarship, which was published in the "Publications of the German Historical. Mosse Prize for the Best Book in Cultural and Intellectual History for German Orientalism in the Age of Empire: Religion, Race, and Scholarship, which was published in the "Publications of the German Historical Institute" series. "Awarding of Boyd Professorship". Louisiana State University, Department of History. Retrieved July 31, 2015. "Curriculum Vitae of Suzanne Marchand". Louisiana State University. Retrieved July 31, 2015

Republicanism and Liberalism in America and the German States, 1750-1850 (Publications of the German Historical Institute). The German Invention of Race (Suny Series, Philosophy and Race).

Orientalism’ certainly contributed to European empire-building, but it also .

Orientalism’ certainly contributed to European empire-building, but it also helped to destroy a narrow Christian-classical canon.

Edward Said On Orientalism - Продолжительность: 40:32 Palestine Diary Recommended for yo. Everyone should watch this War Of The Ocean Floor - Amazing Octopus Fighting - Продолжительность: 13:41 Deep Sea Fishing Recommended for you. 13:41.

Edward Said On Orientalism - Продолжительность: 40:32 Palestine Diary Recommended for you. 40:32. Animals Being Jerks - Продолжительность: 20:28 Little Maple Man Recommended for you.

Age of Empire: Religion, Race and Scholarship a Rudi Matthee a University of Delaware Version of record first published: 04 Oct 2012

Age of Empire: Religion, Race and Scholarship a Rudi Matthee a University of Delaware Version of record first published: 04 Oct 2012. Her new book examines the evolution of the German scholarly engagement with the East-from Istanbul to Beijing via Bombay and Calcutta-in the period between c. 1800 and the 1930s.

Volume 43 Issue 2: relocating arab nationalism. Oriental Institute, Pusey Lane, Oxford, . Suzanne Marchand, English Français. International Journal of Middle East Studies. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 08 April 2011.

Race and Scholarship Publications of the German Historical Institute by Suzanne L Marchand - 5 Star.

com/q/1/age of the empire.

Nineteenth-century studies of the Orient changed European ideas and cultural institutions in more ways than we usually recognize. "Orientalism" certainly contributed to European empire-building, but it also helped to destroy a narrow Christian-classical canon. This carefully researched book provides the first synthetic and contextualized study of German Orientalistik, a subject of special interest because German scholars were the pace-setters in oriental studies between about 1830 and 1930, despite entering the colonial race late and exiting it early. The book suggests that we must take seriously German orientalism's origins in Renaissance philology and early modern biblical exegesis and appreciate its modern development in the context of nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century debates about religion and the Bible, classical schooling, and Germanic origins. In ranging across the subdisciplines of Orientalistik, German Orientalism in the Age of Empire introduces readers to a host of iconoclastic characters and forgotten debates, seeking to demonstrate both the richness of this intriguing field and its indebtedness to the cultural world in which it evolved.
Comments: (2)
watchman
Reading the previous review, I wonder if its author has fully read Marchand, or Said for that manner. Marchand's book has little to do with Said's Orientalism, in part because Said himself discounts German Orientalism as derivative of French scholarship and barely engages with it in his own book. Marchand's analysis has its own purpose and logic, does a phenomenal job of describing 19th century German scholarship on the various "Easts" of the time, and is well worth reading. An excellent book and one that deserves greater consideration than the previous review gave it. Perhaps the only thing that would have improved it would have been greater concision, for here I sympathize with the previous reviewer, it is indeed a very long book.
Yayrel
Edward Saïd's Orientalism, though published more than thirty years ago, has unleashed a seemingly inexhaustible wave of writing on Western historical knowledge about, and portrayals of, the Orient. Marchand's German Orientalism in the Age of Empire is the latest production to tread a well-worn groove. It has thus become the norm that, in the introduction, the author should criticise Saïd without daring to contradict him outright, caricature his argument to make it seem more generalising than it is, and then explain that, at least as concerns his or her region / period / discipline, there are many exceptions. In short, `it is more complicated', and off we go describing the achievements and the Orientalists of the said region / period / discipline. In the conclusion, likewise, Orientalists from the chosen region / period / discipline are found not to have been as bad as Saïd would have it - in the author's debased version of his framework - though some of them - shame, shame - did collaborate in the colonial project.

That Suzanne Marchand has performed extensive research in writing this book none can deny - and I am giving two stars in recognition of the author's titanic effort. This is as far as I am prepared to go, however, for this mind-numbing block of a book. I actually doubt the prestigious names that endorse it on the back cover have read it from beginning to end. The reverse of the coin of this awesome research is that section after section is devoted to the private life and writings of one writer after another, with only superficial, and sometimes poorly substantiated, generalisation. Amazingly, moreover, the book's subject is limited to academic Orientalism, with almost nothing on the arts or popular literature and scant or no attempt to address broader public perceptions. Another problem is that Marchand completely forgets that the issue was not whether Orientalists supported colonisation, but what discourse they contributed to forming over the Orient and Orientals, and how the tropes they conveyed acted as backdoor encouragements to European domination. Hers is a so dumbed-down version of Saïd that her conclusions end up missing the point, though such was perhaps the inevitable outcome of the author's focus on academic Orientalists and their careers to the detriment of wider perceptions.

Marchand does make the argument that religion, and in particular Biblical interpretation, played a central role in German Orientalist writing until well into the nineteenth century. She has a few interesting, albeit tantalising points on Indology and Aryanism. On the principle, however, `why use 100 words where 1,000 will do to say the same thing', even that is laboured. This book is to be used for reference rather than to be read whole.