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by Fanny Trollope,Pamela Neville-Sington

eBook Domestic Manners of the Americans (Penguin Classics) download ISBN: 0140435611
Author: Fanny Trollope,Pamela Neville-Sington
Publisher: Penguin Classics; 1 edition (November 1, 1997)
Language: English
Pages: 416
ePub: 1362 kb
Fb2: 1707 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf azw doc mbr
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

PAMELA NEVILLE-SINGTON lives in West London. However, the most read of all her books is "Domestic Manners of the Americans" which she published in 1832.

PAMELA NEVILLE-SINGTON lives in West London. She is a member of the Trollope Society, and Viking publish her biography, Fanny Trollope: The Life and Adventures of a Clever Woman. Series: Penguin Classics. It was in that distant year that Fanny and two of her children traveled across the Atlantic Ocean. Her purpose was to join a utopian community in Tennessee whose denizens were freed slaves. Fanny left her impecunious and feckless husband the barrister Thomas Trollope back home in England.

Domestic Manners was published in 1832, written by a British writer named Frances Trollope who had just spent . The book was an instant sensation on both sides of the Atlantic.

Domestic Manners was published in 1832, written by a British writer named Frances Trollope who had just spent four years traveling in the United States. She’d set sail enchanted with the egalitarian promise of the United States and left revolted not only by the poor state of American manners, morals, and lifestyle, but also by what she saw as American hypocrisy about equality. Over here, Domestic Manners sparked popular outrage, making Trollope among the first authors that Americans loved to hate.

When Fanny Trollope set sail for America in 1827 with hopes of joining a Utopian community of emancipated .

When Fanny Trollope set sail for America in 1827 with hopes of joining a Utopian community of emancipated slaves, she took with her three of her children and a young French artist, leaving behind her son Anthony, growing debts and a husband going slowly mad from mercury poisoning. But what followed was a tragicomedy of illness, scandal and failed business ventures.

When Fanny Trollope set sail for America in 1827 with hopes of joining a Utopian community of emancipated slaves, she took with her three of her children. Category: Travel Writing Nonfiction Classics Arts & Entertainment Biographies & Memoirs Literary Figure Biographies & Memoirs 19th Century .

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Domestic Manners of the Americans is a 2-volume 1832 travel book by Frances Milton Trollope, which follows her travels through America and her residence in Cincinnati, at the time still a frontier town. The text now resides in the public domain. PAMELA NEVILLE-SINGTON lives in West London

When Fanny Trollope set sail for America in 1827 with hopes of joining a Utopian community of emancipated slaves, she took with her three of her children and a young French artist, leaving behind her son Anthony, growing debts and a husband going slowly mad from mercury poisoning. Nevertheless, on her return to England Fanny turned her misfortunes into a remarkable book. PAMELA NEVILLE-SINGTON lives in West London.

Pamela Neville-Singleton (Annotations). Fanny Trollope was Anthony Trollope's mother, an author and intellectual in her own right. There is much, much more in ‘Domestic Manners of the Americans’ than just criticism. I wish I’d read it years ag. . I have to read it! Moved to Put To One Side For Now shelf owing to the extremely annoying nature of Fanny Trollope.

Domestic Manners was a sensation on both sides of the Atlantic. A masterpiece of nineteenth-century travel-writing, it is also a timeless satire on a society torn between high ideals and human frailties. When Fanny Trollope set sail for America in 1827, she took with her three of her children and a young French artist. She left behind her son Anthony, growing debts and a husband going slowly mad from mercury poisoning.

Penguin Classics) discussion and chapter questions and find Domestic Manners of the Americans (Penguin Classics) study guide questions and answers. Get started today for free

Study Domestic Manners of the Americans (Penguin Classics) discussion and chapter questions and find Domestic Manners of the Americans (Penguin Classics) study guide questions and answers. Get started today for free. All Documents from Domestic Manners of the Americans (Penguin Classics).

When Fanny Trollope set sail for America in 1827 with hopes of joining a Utopian community of emancipated slaves, she took with her three of her children and a young French artist, leaving behind her son Anthony, growing debts and a husband going slowly mad from mercury poisoning. But what followed was a tragicomedy of illness, scandal and failed business ventures. Nevertheless, on her return to England Fanny turned her misfortunes into a remarkable book. A masterpiece of nineteenth-century travel-writing, Domestic Manners of the Americans is a vivid and hugely witty satirical account of a nation and was a sensation on both sides of the Atlantic.
Comments: (7)
Llathidan
I'm not at all surprised at Frances Trollope's perception of Americans in the 1820s. Even today I often wonder what happened to a culture that for the most part, has no concept of etiquette. And it goes far beyond culture or the desire to appear cultured. The "do unto others" Golden Rule is not rocket science; it is common sense, particularly when it comes to having one's dress sprayed with saliva-infused chewing tobacco. Frances' sensibilities were rightfully affected but what would she do if she saw a gentlewoman in Modern America who might just have to spit into a fair gentleman's eye in retaliation of being sprayed in that way?

All in all, this was a very interesting travel diary. The pockets of civilization in the newly populated west were to be admired, cultured or not. The developed eastern towns had their own methods of cultivating a style all their own that represented their unique value system. English culture and society was wonderfully refined and Frances was a delightful example of English snob that many of us love to read about but it was twice as good coming in the first person.
Brick my own
Very well written, detailed, and (one is forced to believe) scrupulously fair. Eye opening picture of America in the 1820's. Fanny Trollope could only view American through the prism of her own culture and experience and she understandably lacks grounding in the origins of some of the behaviors and customs she reports but one has to admire her determination to report just what she saw without exaggeration leaving it to the reader to draw his/her own conclusions. When she is not talking about manners, her descriptions of the countryside and the natural wonders of the states she visited, fill one with a longing to see them as she did in pristine condition before the hand of man was too advanced.
Gavinrage
Fanny Trollope (1779-1863) wrote over 35 novels and several non-fictions books in her effort to rescue her family from poverty. However, the most read of all her books is "Domestic Manners of the Americans" which she published in 1832. It was in that distant year that Fanny and two of her children traveled across the Atlantic Ocean. Her purpose was to join a utopian community in Tennessee whose denizens were freed slaves.
Fanny left her impecunious and feckless husband the barrister Thomas Trollope back home in England. Her famous son Anthony did not make the trip as he was a student at Harrow School. Fanny knew her husband would join her in the USA when money became available. Later the family would flee to Bruges to escape creditors. Fanny eventually lived out her life in Florence near her son Thomas Trollope.
After leaving Tennessee the Trollopes settled for two years in the Queen City of the West Cincinnati, Ohio. Fanny did not like America or the American people! She found us xenephobic; boastful, prideful and violent.She hated the hypocrisy of life in Midwest Ohio although she did attend such cultural attractions as opera, plays and lectures. She favored the state Anglican Church of Great Britain not caring for America's separation between church and state.
This book could well be read alongside Charles Dickens' "American Notes for General Circulation" based on his 1842 six month trip to the USA.
Both Trollope and Dickens found the Americans crude, lacking in manners
and eager to make a quick buck. Listen to Trollope at her most scathing:
"..among the rich and the poor, in the slave states, and in the free states...I do not like them. I do not like their principals, I do not like their manners, I do not like their opinions." (p.314).
Fanny Trollope's book is more interesting than Dickens since she discusses colorful characters and shares anecdotes about her sojourn in our young republic. Like Dickens she hates the odious practice of tobacco chewing and the mangling of the English language. Trollope found us Yankees to be too serious and viewing us as poorly read. Unlike the wealthy and famous Dickens, Mrs. Trollope was a middle-aged woman fighting off poverty with her pen. I enjoyed her descriptions of nature such as those she paints of the Potomac River, Northern Virginia and the Niagra Falls area in New York and Canada. She is aware of flora and fauna and describes them with knowledge and in beautiful prose.
Dickens and Trollope give us the eye to see America in the days prior to the Civil War when the curse of chattel slavery ruled the land. Since those days America has granted freedom to all citizens. I wish both Fanny and Charles could visit us again in the 21st century. Their remarks would be of great interest to this reviewer and countless others!
Trash Obsession
I thoroughly enjoyed this kind of a "travelogue" through c1830 America. The way Mrs Trollope wrote, it felt like a letter from a friend about her trip, but she just happened to be writing from 1830. I am interested in the history of how every day people lived, and what things looked like and felt like, more than I am interested in just what war happened when (although it's important to know that too). I also enjoyed how she contrasted the habits of the Americans vs the habits of her upper class English world. She found the Americans to be hard working in their pursuit of their livelihood, maybe a bit too religious, and somewhat uninterested in the finer things in life, like the arts and literature. She also thought Americans were overly proud of their young country's accomplishments and too quick to defend what they saw as their American superiority. Kind of like today.
Sti
This is a very interesting description of a period in our history that I haven't read much about. Hearing about 1832 in mid America from a fairly proper English lady is eye-opening. I am enjoying reading Mrs Trollope's views.
Togar
This is a must have book.
fr0mTheSkY
You'll want to read this book. Mrs. Trollope wrote it almost 200 years ago but you will still recognize some of her descriptions in modern Americans.