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by Julian Baggini

eBook What's It All About?: Philosophy and the Meaning of Life download ISBN: 0195315790
Author: Julian Baggini
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (January 8, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 224
ePub: 1526 kb
Fb2: 1803 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf doc mobi docx
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Julian Baggini thinks not. Rather, as Baggini argues in What's It All About, meaning can be found in a variety of ways.

Julian Baggini thinks not.

Baggini's book is a pellucid reminder that philosophy is a wonderfully universal, democratic endeavor. As questions go, there is no simpler and no more productive query than "What's it all about?" and in the short span of a cab ride, it is the driver and not 'the world's greatest living philosopher' 1), whose intellect does the inviting, the confounding, and the demanding. For the reader of 'What's it All About?' the philosophical ride infinitely exceeds the fare. -Tim Weldon, Philosophical Practice. Useful and provocative.

He writes regularly for the Guardian, Independent and Independent on Sunday, Prospect and the TES, and has appeared on Nightwaves and In Our Time

He writes regularly for the Guardian, Independent and Independent on Sunday, Prospect and the TES, and has appeared on Nightwaves and In Our Time. He is the author of Making Sense: Philosophy Behind the Headlines (OUP) and Atheism: A Very Short Introduction (OUP). Библиографические данные. What's It All About?: Philosophy And The Meaning Of Life.

In What’s It All About?, Julian Baggini says no, there is no single meaning. Instead, Baggini argues meaning can be found in a variety of ways, in this life.

What is the meaning of life? It is a question that has intrigued the great philosophers-and has been hilariously lampooned by Monty Python. Indeed, the whole idea strikes many of us as vaguely pompous, a little absurd. Is there one profound and mysterious meaning to life, a single ultimate purpose behind human existence? In Whats It All About?, Julian Baggini says no, there is no single meaning.

Julian Baggini (1968 – ) is a British philosopher, author of several books about philosophy written for a general . He was awarded his P. in 1996 from University College London. His recent book, What’s It All About?

He was awarded his P. His recent book, What’s It All About?: Philosophy and the Meaning of Life is a secular and non-hubristic inquiry into the question of the meaning of life

What's It All About?: Philosophy and the Meaning of Life by Julian Baggini 256pp, Granta, £1. 9

What's It All About?: Philosophy and the Meaning of Life by Julian Baggini 256pp, Granta, £1. 9. Although distinguished by the quality of its argument, Julian Baggini's What's It All About? appears to have been written with one eye on the elp market, as exemplified by the works of Alain de Botton. And spaghetti westerns and what that ant says in Antz, and Dead Poets Society, It's a Wonderful Life and The Matrix are all really rather philosophical in their own way, aren't they? He is sensible enough to know that these cursory nods to popular culture don't advance his argument one iota, but the subtext is: "Don't be afraid, dear reader.

What is the best book about the meaning of life. Philosophy and the Meaning of Life by Julian Baggini. Many are saying that it’s on a fundamental level

What is the best book about the meaning of life. Many are saying that it’s on a fundamental level. show more What is the best book about the meaning of life.

Home Browse Books Book details, What's It All About? . InWhat's It All About?, Julian Baggini says no, there is no single meaning.

Home Browse Books Book details, What's It All About? Philosophy and the Meaning. What's It All About? Philosophy and the Meaning of Life. What is the meaning of life? It is a question that has intrigued the great philosophers-and has been hilariously lampooned by Monty Python. Is there one profound and mysterious meaning to life, a single ultimate purpose behind human existence? InWhat's It All About?, Julian Baggini says no, there is no single meaning.

What is the meaning of life? It is a question that has intrigued the great philosophers--and has been hilariously lampooned by Monty Python. Indeed, the whole idea strikes many of us as vaguely pompous and perhaps more than a little absurd. Is there one profound answer, an ultimate purpose behind human existence?Julian Baggini thinks not. Rather, as Baggini argues in What's It All About, meaning can be found in a variety of ways. He succinctly breaks down six answers people commonly suggest when considering what life is all about--helping others, serving humanity, being happy, becoming successful, enjoying each day as if it were your last, and "freeing your mind." By reducing the vague, mysterious question of "meaning" to a series of more specific (if unmysterious) questions about what gives life purpose and value, he shows that the quest for meaning can be personal, empowering, and uplifting.Illustrating his argument with the thoughts of many of the great philosophers and examples drawn from everyday life, Baggini convincingly shows that the search for meaning is personal and within the power of each of us to find.
Comments: (7)
Brajind
This is Alice Sebold. The story is bleak. Confrontational. And deeply affecting. A woman kills her aging mother. And in the story that unfolds, you learn why. The daughter's relationship with the mother, always fraught, culminates in the darkest of deeds. But the books is about far more than that. It is about a child parenting the parent. A child growing up in the shadow of a narcissistic mother. The book is a tour de force. Sebold, unlike so many writers, can access the corners of our darkest, deepest selves and drag them into the light. A gut-wrenching, humane and poignant and deeply heart-rending read.
Arlelond
So uncomfortable. It's depressing and horrifying. From the first sentence, it's a shock although I kept hoping there was some redeeming value to the statement that she killed her mother. Not really, although this mother was a real barracuda. I could almost cheer the murderess on. But really, it just goes downhill from the first sentence. So it's a great exploration of mental illness, and the way that mental illness is handed down and spread around but honestly, I've got enough of all that that who needs it in fiction? Even if it's well-written.

I think the one bright spot was the main character's ex-husband. If you have to have an ex-husband, this is the guy to have, someone you can call up in the middle of the night, tell him you killed your mom and he comes.

And thinking of it, I think this is also an indictment of the US medical system. One person's mental illness affecting everyone around her in a society that has largely demanded over the years that people take care of themselves and their families, that mental illness be hidden. There may be help available, but you have to ask for it, you have to disclose the weakness and shame in the family. If this is part of Sebold's intended message, it's probably wasted as the only people likely to see it are the ones that are already familiar with the problem.
Dammy
This book is magnificent. I was almost put off it by the negative reviews, but I agree that a lot of the negative points that reviewers put out here are way, WAY off the mark. I don't know how anyone could dislike the main character...I don't know why anyone would want the story tied up in a pretty bow at the end. Then ending is the POINT--life doesn't tie up in a pretty bow--things happen, we make them happen, and we move through them to the other side. I love Alice Sebold's writing, too--she paints a scene or a character with simplicity, with reality and with warmth. She is dark--this is a dark story. But I've read darker stuff, and the truth of the emotions expressed in the book, in all their confusion and complexity, is touching, empathetic and ultimately joyful. Don't let the bad reviews put you off--Alice Sebold is a genius.
Bliss
This is an intense, thought-provoking book, that examines the mental state of an adult daughter after she kills her mentally ill, dying mother. It's an uncomfortable topic and asks more questions than answers, but provides fodder to stimulate thought around the US health care system, mental illness, the US criminal defense system, compassion killing vs. murder, and familial obligation.
A fantastic read. I suppose the negative comments are due to the uncomfortable subject matter.
Wenaiand
I can understand why people who loved a best selling book like "The Lovely Bones" might not care for this book. What made "The Lovely Bones" work is that despite the gruesome crime, and the loss the characters felt, the little girl never left us and from our point of view, she was in a better place. But "The Lovely Bones" was clearly fiction. The dark subject matter was treated delicately. This is not so in "The Almost Moon." The subject matter is what it is, and for those who have been placed in a position of caring for (or dealing with) someone with a mental illness (particularly one who vacillates between being both helpless and controlling as Helen's mother did) the plot rings true and comes off more as an autobiography. Ms. Sebold explores the disturbing fact that mental illness can have long lasting effects that reach far and wide and are often the impetus for emotional problems in others, particularly spouses and children. In that regard the novel reminds me of Gillian Flynn's "Sharp Objects." The conflicting emotions of love and hate, responsibility and contempt, that Helen feels gave me the impression that Helen really is Alice and that the first person account is more than just a storytelling device. (I haven't read her memoir so perhaps that's already a known fact.) On page ninety-six Helen makes the statement, "Natalie's mom drank booze. That was enviable to me. The ease of being able to locate it in a bottle was like a dream." If Ms Sebold is not writing from experience then she did a hell of a job researching the subject matter. I think the writing here is far superior to "The Lovely Bones." Although I did find some of it disturbing, I also found it fascinating. If "Lucky" is so much better than this book as some have stated, then I'm looking forward to reading it as well.
Usanner
Before The Almost Moon, I read Alice Sebold's The Lovely Bones because a good friend recommended it. It was definitely worth the day and a half it took to read it (couldn't put it down), and because of that I went looking for more of Sebold's books. So along came The Almost Moon. Alice Sebold has a keen writer's instinct for storytelling and letting a story unfold. Her style is fascinating, her prose exceptional, and her ability to keep you in the story is magnetic. I since have purchased Lucky and can't wait to get into that.

Almost Moon is a story about relationships and how they build us up and wear us down. It takes our inner most, deeply hidden secrets about our real and possibly unexplored feelings and exposes them to the light of day. It is harsh and scary sometimes, yet plausible and soothing. Throughout The Almost Moon Sebold handles the opening line with great dexterity and amazingly helps us to walk in the shoes of another, to feel someone else's sense of failure and doom and missed oppportunities and perhaps bad decisions.

It's a bumpy road of a ride, and done so smoothly that you just don't mind!