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eBook Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America download

by Dana Frank

eBook Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America download ISBN: 0896087565
Author: Dana Frank
Publisher: South End Press (October 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 128
ePub: 1480 kb
Fb2: 1814 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: lrf rtf mbr lrf
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Women banana workers have organized themselves and gained increasing control over their unions, their workplaces, and .

Women banana workers have organized themselves and gained increasing control over their unions, their workplaces, and their lives. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd.

Over the past 20 years, bananeras have organized themselves and gained increasing control over their unions, their workplaces, and their lives

I want to learn how to defend myself from whoever tries to oppress me, whether it's my husband, my union, or my boss. Over the past 20 years, bananeras have organized themselves and gained increasing control over their unions, their workplaces, and their lives.

Dana Frank is a professor of History at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and the author of. .

She has published essays in the Washington Post, SF Chronicle, San Jose Mercury News and The Nation. Friends who have studied with Dr. Frank, in the seaside town of Santa Cruz perhaps two hours south of here, have talked about her work in history as a three-pronged trident, like Neptune, ready to strike at a single second. One fork shows us that, there are no Americans, there are only "Americans. Another looks for the hope of successful social movements.

Here we apply our indices to public opinion data on citizens and political parties of 13 Latin American countries.

Women banana e waging a powerful revolution by making gender equity central in Latin . This book is about the women's movement in Latin America involving women in the Banana unions and their fight for their own voice in the union.

Women banana e waging a powerful revolution by making gender equity central in Latin American labor organizing. Their successes disrupt the popular image of the Latin American woman worker as a passive bystander and broadly I want to learn how to defend myself from whoever tries to oppress me, whether it’s my husband, my union, or my boss. Apr 06, 2013 Jolene Simko rated it it was amazing.

Women banana workers have organized themselves and gained increasing control over their unions, their .

Professor Frank is a well known scholar and author of many books including "Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America" and recently released a new book titled, The Long Honduran Night: Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath o.

Professor Frank is a well known scholar and author of many books including "Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America" and recently released a new book titled, The Long Honduran Night: Resistance, Terror, and the United States in the Aftermath of the Coup.

Dana Frank is Professor of History Emerita at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her writings on human rights and .

-Margaret Randall, author ofWhen I Look Into the Mirror and See You: Women, Terror, and Resistance Women banana workers have organized themselves and gained increasing control over their unions, their workplaces, and their lives.

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“I want to learn how to defend myself from whoever tries to oppress me, whether it’s my husband, my union, or my boss.”—a bananera

Women banana workers—bananeras—are waging a powerful revolution by making gender equity central in Latin American labor organizing. Their successes disrupt the popular image of the Latin American woman worker as a passive bystander and broadly re-imagine the possibilities of international labor solidarity.

Over the past 20 years, bananeras have organized themselves and gained increasing control over their unions, their workplaces, and their lives. Highly accessible and narrative in style, Bananeras: Women Transforming the Banana Unions of Latin America recounts the history and growth of this vital movement.

Starting in 1985 with one union in La Lima, Honduras, and expanding domestically through the late 1990s, experienced activists successfully reached out to younger women with a message of empowerment. In a compelling example of transnational feminism at work, the bananeras crossed borders to ally with banana workers in five other banana exporting countries in Latin America, arguing all the while that empowering women at every level of their organizations makes for stronger unions, better able to confront the ever-encroaching multinational corporations.

When the bananeras of Latin America, with their male allies, explicitly integrate gender equity into their organizing work as essential to effective labor internationalism—when they refuse to separate the global struggle against trans-national corporations from the formidable efforts at home to achieve equity and respect—they inspire all of us to envision a new framework for internationalism that places women’s human rights at the center of global class politics.

A professor of American studies at the University of California Santa Cruz, Dana Frank focuses on US and international labor issues. Published in The Washington Post, The Nation, and other periodicals, she is the author of Buy American and, with Robin D.G. Kelley and Howard Zinn, of Three Strikes.

Comments: (5)
Grosho
Awesome book. Open your eyes to the many women in the world
Thetalune
At first I found myself a little bored reading BANANERAS, Dana Frank's total reimagination of the labor union as the engine of women's liberation in first Honduras then elsewhere south of the border, but then the sweep of her narrative began to carry me away. Not liking bananas myself, I had somehow merely lived my whole life without ever inquiring about the women who picked and packed them. Who were these women? How have they eked out meaningful existences desite isolation and backbreaking labor? How do they change history with solidarity and an unspoken feminism? For, as Dr. Frank reveals wryly, the Latin American bananeras recoil from the word "feminism" itself, treating it as though it had no meaning nor place in the vocabulary of the modern radical worker. In a way, Frank's book is the story about how a word lives even when it is judged irrelevant and in consequence unspoken.

Richly researeched, the new BANANERAS makes manifest in rich ways the geometrical growth of the new labor unions powered by women's work (though some of the locals employ Latins of several genders). Frank was there when the women met and organized; she attended some of the furit packers' conferences and showed how uneducated women managed to cope with, then translate for the benefit of others, both absent and present, hifalutin technical and political concepts such as transnational trade agreements. She showed what happens when one woman's isolation showly begins to transform, like the shards of a broken flower pot, into a multifaceted, yet striking new mosaic of terra cotta. She brings her characters to life with simple pen strokes, like Colette. Here she is, for example, introducing us to Selfa Sandoval, a Guatemalan fruit worker: "Selfa is a laughing, energetic, tough cookie, who remains powerful in her union because she works hard and fellow rank-and-file members know it." Not only do we see Sandoval herself, but we see her in context of a group of shadowy, but respectful, union members in the general population.

Friends who have studied with Dr. Frank, in the seaside town of Santa Cruz perhaps two hours south of here, have talked about her work in history as a three-pronged trident, like Neptune, ready to strike at a single second. One fork shows us that, there are no Americans, there are only "Americans." Another looks for the hope of successful social movements. And a third, and the sharpest of all, is her brain.
Bandiri
I've travelled throughout the world, as a witness at the attempt at organization where people are so poor and downtrodden. Latin America is highly "anti-union". Merely any attempt brings down murder, intimidation and blacklisting upon workers. This book helps add clarity to why people, especial, women, organize.
Insanity
I was very impressed. It was in great condition, and it took no time to be delivered!
Thordibandis
Let me start off by saying this author did a lot of research for this book. That's where my praise will stop. It's 110 pages of boredom. I would rather read a 110 page book on how to properly eat a banana then to read that again. Each page introduces 3 random people in a setting that is never talked about again for the rest of the book. The women followed in this book cleary have communist leanings, and the author goes out of her way to blame men, and the US, for all of the worlds ills. Teachers should not assign this book for college level reading.