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eBook A Distant Front in the Cold War: The USSR in West Africa and the Congo, 1956-1964 (Cold War International History Project) download

by Sergey Mazov

eBook A Distant Front in the Cold War: The USSR in West Africa and the Congo, 1956-1964 (Cold War International History Project) download ISBN: 0804760594
Author: Sergey Mazov
Publisher: Stanford University Press (October 15, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1215 kb
Fb2: 1725 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: rtf doc mobi mbr
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Battleground Africa: Cold War in the Congo, 1960–1965 (Cold War International History Project) by Lise .

Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Series: Cold War International History Project. Hardcover: 256 pages. Publisher: Stanford University Press (October 15, 2010).

Article in Cold War History 12(3):565-567 · August 2012 with 9 Reads. The historiography on international labor politics in the Cold War era, and particularly on the AFL-CIO’s global projection, seems to be advancing in leaps and bounds. DOI: 1. 080/14682745. Cite this publication. 2 After a lull of almost 15 years, it reemerged in the late 1980s when a new crop of.

Article in Journal of Cold War Studies 14(3):218-220 · January 2012 with 36 Reads.

Part of the Cold War International History Project Series from Woodrow Wilson Center Press.

A Distant Front in the Cold War reveals West Africa as a significant site of Cold War conflict in the late 1950s and early 1960s. archives, as well as an international sampling of recent scholarly works. Part of the Cold War International History Project Series from Woodrow Wilson Center Press.

Cold War International History Project Series. Journal of Cold War Studies. Woodrow Wilson Center Press with Stanford University Press, 2010. Series Preface James G. Hershberg. Svetlana Savranskaya, George Washington University.

SERIES: Cold War International History Project.

Throughout the ferocious Algerian War of Independence in the 1950s, Moscow provided military, technical and material . A Distant Front in the Cold War: The USSR in West Africa and the Congo, 1956–1964 (2010).

Throughout the ferocious Algerian War of Independence in the 1950s, Moscow provided military, technical and material assistance to the FLN, and trained hundreds of its military leaders in the USSR. The Soviet Union was the first country in the world to recognize the Provisional Government of the Algerian Republic in 1962 by establishing diplomatic relations a few months before the official proclamation of its independence. The Fate of Africa: A History of Fifty Years of Independence (2006).

International Relations Political Books. General International Relations Books. A Distant Front in the Cold War : The USSR in West Africa and the Congo, 1956-1964. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Library availability.

Journal of Cold War Studies. Mazov provides four detailed cases studies of Soviet policy during the Khrushchev years-those of Ghana, Guinea, Mali, and Congo. In fact, as Mazov demonstrates throughout the book, specific concrete opportunities to challenge the West and Western inflouence in Africa were the driving force in Soviet policy during the period from 1956 to 1964. Therefore, policy was much more ad hoc and reactive in nature than earlier Western analysts assumed.

A Distant Front in the Cold War reveals West Africa as a significant site of Cold War conflict in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Although the region avoided the extreme tensions of the standoff in Eastern Europe or in the Cuban missile crisis, it nevertheless offers a vivid example of political, economic, and propagandistic rivalry between the U.S. and the USSR. For Africa, this was a critical period characterized by decolonization and the formation of African countries' first foreign policies. The United States and the Soviet Union both hoped to win the sympathies of the newly established states, and Sergey Mazov's book is the first account of that competition, which the Soviet Union lost, largely through ignorance of the region. Mazov presents evidence from previously inaccessible or unknown documents in Russian and U.S. archives, as well as an international sampling of recent scholarly works. The rich historical account pays particular attention to the repercussions of Soviet West African experience on future Soviet foreign policy, especially in the Third World.