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by G.R. Watson

eBook The Roman Soldier (Aspects of Greek and Roman Life) download ISBN: 0801493129
Author: G.R. Watson
Publisher: Cornell University Press (March 25, 1985)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1424 kb
Fb2: 1710 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf docx txt mbr
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

The Roman Soldier (Aspect. has been added to your Cart. I bought a copy of this book after enjoying the public library's copy for far too long. This is a heavily-footnoted, serious discussion of the structure of the Roman army and the life of its soldiers throughout most of the empire.

The Roman Soldier (Aspect. It would have been nice had the author made more of a point to distinguish between structure at different times and in different parts of the empire, but on the whole the book gives a great overview of what a typical soldier might have experienced.

The Roman Soldier (Aspects of Greek and Roman Life). This book gives a pretty good idea of what life was like as a roman soldier. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in learning more about the roman army. 0801493129 (ISBN13: 9780801493126). Jul 21, 2011 Fredrick Danysh added it. Shelves: history. Life, tactics, and equipment of the Roman soldier. This book also discusses the changes in the Roman army that took place over time.

The Roman Soldier book.

Cornell University Press, 1969. Like others of that series, it has the full apparatus of scholarship: the notes and appendices alone cover about one third of the book (pages 155 to 246). There are eleven distinct indices (people, subdivided into nomina, cognomina, emperors, ancient authors, and modern authors; deities; places; inscriptions; papyri; texts; and a general index).

Exclusive Licence to Publish: The Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies. Recommend this journal. The Journal of Roman Studies.

Find roman soldier from a vast selection of Books. The Roman Soldier (Aspects of Greek and Roman Life) Watson, . Valerius: A Roman Soldier's Quest for Glory by Dr Paul Perkins (English) Paperba.

Similar books and articles. The Roman Soldier G. R. Watson: The Roman Soldier. Ancient Technology K. D. White: Greek and Roman Technology. Aspects of Greek and Roman Life. London: Thames & Hudson, 1969.

The Roman Soldier (Aspects of Greek and Roman Life) : . Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 8 pre-owned listings. The Roman Soldier by . Watson (Hardback, 1969). Pre-owned: lowest price.

Check out this book or this one. Want to explore the possibilities of life in a Roman legion? Rosemary Sutcliff’s The Eagle is a historical fiction series. . Watson also delves into military life for both Greek and Roman soldiers in The Roman Soldier. This video shows how they prepared for battle, including what they wore and the equipment they carried. What were the differences between a Roman soldier and a Germanic warrior? Read this book by Lindsay Powell. Want to explore the possibilities of life in a Roman legion? Rosemary Sutcliff’s The Eagle is a historical fiction series that navigates the adventures and dangers of being a young soldier

Roman Colonization Under the Republic (Aspects of Greek and Roman life). LoeweMichael: Chinese ideas of life and death: faith, myth and reason in the Han Period (202 .

Roman Colonization Under the Republic (Aspects of Greek and Roman life). London: Thames and Hudson, 1969. xii, 226 pp. London, Sydney and Boston: George Allen and Unwin Ltd,. Volume 47 Issue 1 - Alvin P. Cohen. Theodora Suk Fong Jim. A COURSE BOOK ON THE ANCIENT GREEKS - Dillon (., Garland (. The Ancient Greeks.

Recreates the life and training of the rank-and-file soldier, from enlistment to discharge
Comments: (7)
Wohald
A very sketchy overview of the lives of a Roman soldier. Much is missing such as the many other ways that a soldier was given capital punishment. The only thing I picked up from this book was that a soldier was paid about 1/2 of a centurions pay and that in boot camp a wooden horse was made so the recruits could learn to leap over them first without and then finally with a full pack of gear.
Darksinger
I bought a copy of this book after enjoying the public library's copy for far too long. This is a heavily-footnoted, serious discussion of the structure of the Roman army and the life of its soldiers throughout most of the empire. It would have been nice had the author made more of a point to distinguish between structure at different times and in different parts of the empire, but on the whole the book gives a great overview of what a typical soldier might have experienced.

I found it to be a fascinating read, full of facts that, for me at least, were new.

A couple of caveats:

1) The notes and references are almost as long as the main text; don't be surprised.

2)A couple of the reviews have noted that the author translates the Latin and Greek for you; this is true only of the main text. The footnotes contain extensive quotations, particularly in Latin, which are usually left untranslated. Fortunately, most of it seems pretty easy to follow.
Winotterin
Well researched and detailed study of the Roman soldier in history. Focuses on the ordinary soldier and his life. Quite well done.
Shliffiana
The chief export of Rome was the Roman legions. It's chief industry was conquest. Arguably , when Rome stopped it's conquests, the empire began to fall, although there were certainly many other factors.

The Roman legions made Rome what it was, annexing the land of the neighboring Etruscans, then the rest of Italy, then Spain, Greece, North Africa, and other countries occupying the Mediterranean basin that eventually were joined to the empire. The well-trained, well-armed standing army of Rome made it possible.

Author G. R. Watson tells the story of The Roman Soldier from the bottom up, discussing recruitment, training, pay, rank, promotion, religion, organization, retirement, and other details.

No religion held total sway over the legions, but the eagle standard became the focus of a dedication for the average Roman soldier that was as religious as the faith of the kamikaze of the 20th century. As centuries passed, the grip of the legions loosened, many historians saying it was due to the increasingly willingness of native Romans to steer clear, requiring growing recruitment of barbarian outsiders. The training slipped until eventually the Roman army fought hand-to-hand in the style of the barbarian enemies.

But in the first few centuries AD, Watsons's focus, the legions were at their peak, their skills honed through relentless training. When they weren't fighting or training, they were put to work building a road system that would allow them easy access to the distant parts of the empire. They did such a good job, many of those roads remain today, some in actual use.

Good book.
Gholbirdred
Unlike other armies in antiquity, the Roman army evolved to be a formal institution with a distinctive military code, standard equipment, defined ranks and duties, as well as laws and procedures affecting the life and retirement of its soldiers. Although service was long (20 years/no family allowed) and discipline was strict (i.e. decimation), it was truly the first modern professional army with very specialized units ranging from doctors and cooks to sappers and siege engineers. Roman soldiers usually came from the poorer elements of society by the time of the Late Republic and received a thorough training as primarily infantry men: cavalry being left either to the equestrian class or mostly foreign auxilliaries. Their training, efficiency and tenacity allowed the Roman Legions to fight cohesively as flexible units to overcome superior numbers under higher attrition. It made Rome the master of the Mediterranean world and most of modern Europe for over 1500 years (counting the Byzantine.)

G.R. Watson provides a historical and sociological analysis of the Roman army from the perspective of the individual soldier as opposed to being just a general chronological summary or studying it more under a political analysis. Watson covers the subjects in the order that a new recruit would encounter them such as sign up, training, terms of service, etc. The book doesn't study the evolution of the Roman army per se as he uses the later Roman Imperial army as a model as it had pretty much fully evolved in its institutions by that time. Watson reinforces his description and summary with various examples from different periods in the Roman Empire without resorting to a chronological order.

This is overall a good book that gives the reader an idea as to what the Roman army was like from the perspective of the average soldier. Despite being a thin paperback, the book's conclusions are supported by extensive and thorough historical references and is easy to read for any level of education. I strongly recommend this book and Adrian Goldsworthy's "Roman Warfare" for a good textual foundation in learning more about the Roman army.
Lahorns Gods
An excellent supplement to Wilkes standard text about the Roman army. This book makes it more personal, more accessible to the reader. The major flaw is a collasping of different time periods on many occassions -- the army was a dynamic institution and should be portrayed as such.