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eBook Framing Democracy: Civil Society and Civic Movements in Eastern Europe download

by John K. Glenn

eBook Framing Democracy: Civil Society and Civic Movements in Eastern Europe download ISBN: 0804738610
Author: John K. Glenn
Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (May 1, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1690 kb
Fb2: 1283 kb
Rating: 4.1
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Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Nowhere were these developments dramatized more brightly than in Eastern Europe in 1989, as newly formed civic movements .

Nowhere were these developments dramatized more brightly than in Eastern Europe in 1989, as newly formed civic movements replaced long-standing Leninist regimes with democratic governments. Yet it is clear that the waves of democracy that initially seemed similar have led to widely varying outcomes. While some countries in Eastern Europe were invited to join NATO and the European Union, others were excluded. John K. Glenn, III is Executive Director of the Council for European Studies, a consortium of universities and colleges hosted by Columbia University, and a Visiting Scholar at New York University.

This book offers a critique and reformulation of existing theories of democratization, as well as of earlier understandings of the fall of communism.

Civil society can be understood as the "third sector" of society, distinct from government and business, and including the family and the private sphere. By other authors, civil society is used in the sense of 1) the aggregate of non-governmental organizations and institutions that manifest interests and will of citizens or 2) individuals and organizations in a society which are independent of the government.

VOLUNTAS: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations 14, 129–131 (2003) doi:10. 1023/A:1022927215253.

In Framing Democracy, John Glenn seeks to explain the variation in regime transitions that have occurred in Eastern Europe. The book’s initial claim to provide a unique perspective on the fall of communism in Eastern Europe seems somewhat exaggerated

In Framing Democracy, John Glenn seeks to explain the variation in regime transitions that have occurred in Eastern Europe. The book offers a critique and reformulation of existing theories of democratization, as well as earlier understandings of the fall of communism. The book’s initial claim to provide a unique perspective on the fall of communism in Eastern Europe seems somewhat exaggerated. Glenn makes a good point in stressing that the promotion of Mikhail Gorbachev to the leadership the Communist Party of the Soviet Union is a necessary but not sufficient explanation for the subsequent events in Eastern Europe.

John K. Glenn, III. Framing Democracy: Civil Society and Civic Movements in Eastern Europe. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2001. in Canadian-American Slavic Studies. Author: Andrew . ilton 1. View More View Less. 1 1University of Puget Sound.

Democracy : Civil Society and Civic Movements in Eastern Europe.

Framing Democracy : Civil Society and Civic Movements in Eastern Europe. At the close of the twentieth century, democracy appeared to have overcome the Cold War partition of the world, as countries across the globe had deposed autocratic regimes and held free elections. Nowhere were these developments dramatized more brightly than in Eastern Europe in 1989, as newly formed civic movements replaced long-standing Leninist regimes with democratic governments.

Framing Democracy: Civil Society and Civic Movements in Eastern Europe. M. Steven Fish. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. ARTICLE CITATION. Steven Fish, "Framing Democracy: Civil Society and Civic Movements in Eastern Europe. Glenn, III," The Journal of Politics 64, no. 2 (May, 2002): 660-661. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months.

Civil Society Eastern Europe Civilization. Books about Russia, Soviet Union, Ukraine. What others are saying. Reagan and Gorbachev by Jack Matlock.

At the close of the twentieth century, democracy appeared to have overcome the Cold War partition of the world, as countries across the globe had deposed autocratic regimes and held free elections. Nowhere were these developments dramatized more brightly than in Eastern Europe in 1989, as newly formed civic movements replaced long-standing Leninist regimes with democratic governments.Yet it is clear that the “waves” of democracy that initially seemed similar have led to widely varying outcomes. While some countries in Eastern Europe were invited to join NATO and the European Union, others were excluded. Former communists were elected to power in post-communist Poland and Hungary, but were largely absent in the Czech Republic and were transformed into populists in Slovakia. These differences have led the author to address several questions, including: How similar actually were the Leninist regimes before their dissolution, and how similar were their demises? How did the way communism fell affect the founding of democratic states in Eastern Europe, notably in Poland and Czechoslovakia?This book offers a critique and reformulation of existing theories of democratization, as well as of earlier understandings of the fall of communism. By contrasting the negotiated pact in Poland with the collapse of the regime in Czechoslovakia, it provides a theoretical framework to explain how different paths of democratization affected the prospects for sustainable democracy. The book goes beyond the explanation that a “Gorbachev” effect determined events in the late 1980s by contrasting mobilization against Leninist regimes with negotiations for democratic institutions. It highlights competition between aspiring leaders, reconceptualizing the notion of civil society as a master frame within which movements and leaders sought to mobilize popular support.The book also emphasizes the transformation of networks associated with the birth of a democratic nation, such as the Catholic Church in Poland and the theater strikes in Czechoslovakia. Finally, it analyzes how paths of change structured political competition in new democracies in both the short and the medium term.