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eBook Origins and Revolutions download

by Gamble

eBook Origins and Revolutions download ISBN: 0521677491
Author: Gamble
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (April 2, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 366
ePub: 1401 kb
Fb2: 1482 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf mbr lit doc
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Origins and Revolutions is an effervescent read that skillfully challenges many of the sacred cows of archaeology. It is rich and deep in the philosophical acumen and attention to social theory for which Gamble is known.

Origins and Revolutions is an effervescent read that skillfully challenges many of the sacred cows of archaeology. He also writes with an admirable sense of humour and irony; he knows how to join humanistic flair with empirical rigour at the di. -Robert N. Proctor, Stanford University, Nature.

Origins and Revolutions book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Origins and Revolutions as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In this study Clive Gamble presents and questions two of the most.

Download books for free. The second is the economic and social revolution of the Neolithic period

Download books for free. The second is the economic and social revolution of the Neolithic period.

Origins and Revolutions is an effervescent read that skilfully challenges many of. .

Origins and Revolutions is an effervescent read that skilfully challenges many of the sacred cows of archaeology. Gamble has written a book that deserves serious attention and engagement, and hi sideas are original and far-reaching. Journal of Archaeological Science 'Clive Gamble's Origins and Revolutions enters new, virtually unexplored territory in the field of what may be termed cognitive archaeology: the archaeology of mind.

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Books online: Origins and Revolutions: Human Identity in Earliest Prehistory, 2007, Fishpond. Origins and Revolutions is an effervescent read that skilfully challenges many of the sacred cows of archaeology

Books online: Origins and Revolutions: Human Identity in Earliest Prehistory, 2007, Fishpond. Origins and Revolutions is an effervescent read that skilfully challenges many of the sacred cows of archaeology. it is rich and deep in the philosophical acumen and attention to social theory for which Gamble is known an engaging style, and a healthy lacing of humour. Origins and Revolutions is well worth the effort.

The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution is a 1968 Pulitzer Prize-winning book of history by Bernard Bailyn. It is considered one of the most influential studies of the American Revolution published during the 20th century

The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution is a 1968 Pulitzer Prize-winning book of history by Bernard Bailyn. It is considered one of the most influential studies of the American Revolution published during the 20th century.

Origins and Revolutions - by Clive Gamble March 2007. Origins and Revolutions. Online ISBN: 9780511618598.

In this study Clive Gamble presents and questions two of the most famous descriptions of change in prehistory. The first is the 'human revolution', when evidence for art, music, religion and language first appears. The second is the economic and social revolution of the Neolithic period. Gamble identifies the historical agendas behind 'origins research' and presents a bold alternative to these established frameworks, relating the study of change to the material basis of human identity. He examines, through artefact proxies, how changing identities can be understood using embodied material metaphors and in two major case-studies charts the prehistory of innovations, asking, did agriculture really change the social world? This is an important and challenging book that will be essential reading for every student and scholar of prehistory.
Comments: (5)
Heraly
I got much more than I expected. Gamble works in archaeology but takes some of the latest ideas to bring the subject to today's cutting edge. He attempts three basic efforts roughly paralleling the three sections of the book. He first demolishes the easy storylines of what has passed as prehistoric "revolutions" such as the Neolithic as being pretty much along the lines of magic bullet theories where first we had X (fill in the blank: big brains, language, agriculture, etc.) and then we had significant jumps to people who looked surprisingly close to ... us. The historical connections within European archaeology to various ideologies and cultural preconceptions don't get neglected in his critique.

Then he turns in the second section to his serious rebuilding of archaeology by emphasizing the need to bring the people back into the artefacts. And for this he turns very productively to material culture studies and many of the thinkers who are testing the waters of material agency. Sometimes his language can seem a little convoluted, but the ideas are rich, well illustrated, given many examples from many excavations throughout prehistory, and convincing. Just listing his ideas for how people used objects and tools gives a feel for the way he brings artefacts into people-using forms: sets and nets, enchainment and accumulation, containers and instruments, consuming and fragmenting, additive and reductive technologies, planning depth and tactical depth and curation (maintaining technology over time), and childscape within habitscape. His use of the studies of others who have recreated individual archaeological sites for the manufacture of blades and flakes in the use of flint to apply these concepts brings life to the imagined activities uncovered in these studies. The ample examples, photos, and drawings greatly reduce the tedium of the sometimes heavy theory.

In the last section he then takes his new concepts and applies them to give a different sense of the gradual movement of prehistory. Here, the richness of the extant archaeological studies tumbles out as he brings his new concepts into simpler view. This part was the easiest and most rewarding to read. He is probing how to rebuild the contours of prehistory without the facile origins and revolutions that have defined it sometimes in the past.

What is best about the book for those of us who are not archaeologists is the exploration of material agency and the social-action dimensions of objects. What was oddly missing from the book were connections to biology and evolution, especially cultural evolution. Presumably, he left this out to keep the focus from becoming too wide, but the issues he raises beg to be integrated with cultural evolutionary theory and other fields such as cognitive science. What he does give us, thankfully, is a deep overview of the field of prehistoric studies and a promising set of tools to explore material agency, which is tenaciously taking hold within material culture studies and which is philosophically radical.
Taur
One of my favorite three books this year. Excellent in depth and easy to read. Thanks
Daizil
Here's a sample paragraph:

"Exactly how archaeologists classify a chipped stone as a core is not, however, my main concern. It is enough to appreciate that cores are the result of both fragmentation, knapping a nodule of raw material, and the consumption of those fragments that is structured in a social technology by accumulation and enchainment. Cores are also a good example of a material metaphor where the body provides an understanding of the skills and technique involved. The outer covering of a stone nodule is called the cortex, from the Latin for bark, and has a skin-like appearance. As flakes and blades are detached from the nucleus, or core, they are described in terms of two different faces (Figure 7.2), ventral (front) and dorsal (back). The terms proximal and distal are applied to the head and the foot of both cores and flakes as determined by the origin of the force applied, a geographical proxy for the knapper herself (Figure 7.4). The act of fragmenting is spoken of as leaving scars on the core's surface. These are ridges and hollows that can on occasion be re-fitted to the struck fragments. It is the convex and concave shapes of the surfaces that makes the cores in a PCT both instrument and container (Table 7.4)."

He's using modern word games to create a metaphor in order to reconstruct the thought process of a Paleolithic crafter. He then uses these insights to play additional word games with high-level conceptual metaphors of 'instrument' and 'container.' Some of this is very perceptive, but it's an extended prose poem, not science. Exactly how poets classify a chipped stone is not my main interest.
Nanecele
Excelent!!
Lcena
Quite good but dated