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eBook Descartes's Meditations: An Introduction (Cambridge Introductions to Key Philosophical Texts) download

by Catherine Wilson

eBook Descartes's Meditations: An Introduction (Cambridge Introductions to Key Philosophical Texts) download ISBN: 0521809819
Author: Catherine Wilson
Publisher: Cambridge University Press (December 8, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 284
ePub: 1434 kb
Fb2: 1301 kb
Rating: 4.4
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Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

I teach Descartes in introductory college courses. Reading Wilson's introduction to that great work, I am tempted to hate Descartes.

I teach Descartes in introductory college courses. It is intended as an inroad for the general university student coming to Descartes, perhaps philosophy, for the first time. To zip through this book might help one to organize the dialogue between Descartes and his interlocutors, but that is all, because Wilson's explanations of said fail to penetrate the surface of the original texts. This book is not functional for reading side-by-side with the original.

It is well-suited to university-level courses on Descartes, but can also be read with profit by students in other disciplines.

p. cm. – (Cambridge introductions to key philosophical texts). Includes bibliographical references and index. isbn 0 521 80981 9 (hardback) – isbn 0 521 00766 6 (paperback) 1. Descartes, Rene´, 1596–1650.

cambridge introductions to key. philosophical texts. This new series offers introductory textbooks on what are considered to.

In this new introduction to a classic philosophical text, Cather-. ine Wilson examines the arguments of Descartes’s famous Med-. itations, the book which launched modern philosophy. cambridge introductions to key.

Drawing on the reinterpretations of Descartes' thought of the past twenty-five years, she shows how Descartes constructs a theory of the mind, the body, nature, and God from a premise of radical uncertainty. She discusses in detail the historical context of Descartes' writings and their relationship to early modern science, and at the same time she introduces concepts and problems that define the philosophical.

Clark University, Massachusetts.

wittgenstein’s philosophical investigations by. David G. Stern wittgenstein’s tractatus by Alfred Nordmann aristotle’s nicomachean ethics by Michael Pakaluk. Clark University, Massachusetts.

This new introduction to a philosophical classic draws on the reinterpretations of Descartes' thought of the past twenty-five years. She discusses in detail the historical context of Descartes' writings and their relationship to early modern science.

She discusses in detail the historical context of This new introduction to a philosophical classic draws on the reinterpretations of Descartes' thought of the past twenty-five years. 0521007666 (ISBN13: 9780521007665).

Spinoza's Ethics is one of the most remarkable, important, and difficult books in the history of philosophy: a treatise simultaneously on metaphysics, knowledge, philosophical psychology, moral philosophy, and political philosophy. It presents, in Spinoza's famous 'geometric method', his radical views on God, Nature, the human being, and happiness.

This new introduction to a philosophical classic draws on the reinterpretations of Descartes' thought of the past twenty-five years. Catherine Wilson examines the arguments of Descartes' famous Meditations, revealing how he constructs a theory of the mind, body, nature, and God from a premise of radical uncertainty. She discusses in detail the historical context of Descartes' writings and their relationship to early modern science.
Comments: (3)
funike
Take Noeton's harsh review with a grain of salt. To call Wilson's book "disastrous" is hyperbole. I read it alongside "Meditations" and have no doubt it enhanced my understanding of Descartes' masterpiece. The book is clearly written and logically organized, and brought out subtle points in "Meditations" that would have escaped me otherwise. ("Meditations" is not an easy text, even though it gets assigned in introductory classes.) That said, Wilson does spend too much time cleverly recasting and updating Descartes' arguments. She should have just straightforwardly unpacked them. Students looking for a cut-and-dried guide to "Meditations" might get frustrated.
Uttegirazu
This book seems intended for the serious undergraduate who would like to gain a good understanding of the philosophical issues that animate Descartes, "The Meditations." Unlike other books on Descartes that are geared towards taking up the philosophical issues he raises alone, this book attempts to balance exegesis with discussion of issues in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of science, and the philosophy of mind. Even for the well-read graduate student, this book provides a nice refresher and neat, concise overview of the issues that inform "The Meditations." It isn't "groundbreaking," but, then again, it doesn't pretend to be and very little is, in any case, in academic philosophy. Perhaps the unimpressed reviewer below will share his or her seminal work on the subject and we can all move forward.
Jeyn
I teach Descartes in introductory college courses. I know a little about him. I love Descartes. He was a true genius in whose shadow we today yet live, for better or for worse. But by themselves Descartes' philosophy and his masterpiece the "Meditations on First Philosophy" are treasures of the human spirit.

Reading Wilson's introduction to that great work, I am tempted to hate Descartes. It is intended as an inroad for the general university student coming to Descartes, perhaps philosophy, for the first time. I can imagine no better way to make young minds hate Descartes and develop (or intensify their pre-extant) misology than to put this in their hands.

The claims of the book, its' arguments on their own merits, with these I sincerely take few great issues. The problem is the presentation, which is severely poor. The text is painfully dry, dull, boring, agonizingly overwrought, in short, it obscures the ideas it is intended to clarify and sucks the life from Descartes' philosophy. In short, what ought to render the original accessible and interesting to the novice does entirely the opposite.

One merit, in principle, though not here in execution, of the author's approach is the interweaving of the Descartes' arguments with their respective objections made by his contemporaries. What might serve to helpfully broaden the reader's scope instead results in enormously circuitous routes to ends which leave Descartes' thought seemingly more contorted than elucidated. Rarely does Wilson ever come to the point and simply lay things out in clear fashion. To zip through this book might help one to organize the dialogue between Descartes and his interlocutors, but that is all, because Wilson's explanations of said fail to penetrate the surface of the original texts.

Another flaw - fatal to my mind - is that the author does not stay properly close to the Meditations themselves. This book is not functional for reading side-by-side with the original. If one would prefer a substitute for reading Descartes that is more difficult to follow than the original, then this book is for you!

The text is overly elaborate where simple and straightforward language would not only suffice, but be more appropriate. Yet at the same time, crucial concepts are often not boiled-down to their basic meaning, or where they are, they are given superfluous and even ridiculous monickers. I was at a loss to find certain concepts which trouble my introductory students without exception because the technical vocabulary of the age was quite different that our ordinary language today. Had I not glanced at the author's impressive C.V. I'd have assumed she'd never taught Descartes to undergraduates. My guess now is she has not been in front of intro students for a long, long, time (or that she only teaches turbo-geeks). The author is clearly analytically trained, rather than a proper historian of philosophy, hence it is not surprising that cumbersome terminological artifice abounds. Take, for example, the "Causal Non-inferiority Principle," (that a cause is necessarily greater than its effect), which is discussed ad nauseum despite its perfect simplicity. One senses the book is struggling in vain to justify its own existence by creating a sheen of depth through a constant flow of plain and redundant illustrative examples and diagrams. While one should think such is proper to a text of this sort, the overall effect it that any reader capable of surviving these frankly boring discussions couldn't but feel patronized.

Yes: I am a "continentalist" by training. But I study and appreciate Analytic philosophy as well, and am no wanna-be Derridean goofball. The virtue of the analytic interpretive approach is its clarity and rigor. This text might be rigorous in certain respects, but it is not clear to an ordinary reader - and that is the crucial problem.

Hence, the most generosity I can muster is to say this book is simply mislabeled. It is not an introduction. It might serve the advanced undergraduate philosophy major or early graduate student who is training in the analytic tradition and who enjoys believing their acumen at following such labyrinthine intellectual puzzles means they are better than someone actually able to explain Descartes' arguments and broader historical significance. Anyone else would be better served spending their time reading the original over and again, and/or use something like the "Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Descartes and the Meditations" by Gary Hatfield. It is not, in my opinion, fantastic, but it is far more appropriate, not to mention a bargain by comparison, than this behemoth.