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by Alwyn W. Turner

eBook The Man Who Invented the Daleks: The Strange Worlds of Terry Nation download ISBN: 1845136098
Author: Alwyn W. Turner
Publisher: Aurum Press (August 25, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 356
ePub: 1578 kb
Fb2: 1833 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: rtf azw lit txt
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Invented the Daleks is more than a biography of the writer Terry Nation

Praise for The Man Who Invented the Daleks: The Strange Worlds of Terry Nation ‘Even if you can’t stand science fiction, the chances are that you’ve seen something either written or inspired. The Man Who Invented the Daleks is more than a biography of the writer Terry Nation. As a tribute to Britain’s enduring fascination with the Daleks, it was hard to know which was the greater honour: dominating the Radio Times or triumphing over such iconic national figures.

He was able to bring the writers out from the shadows. Reading the book will not give you a deeper insight into Terry Nation as a man but it will give you a wider understanding of Terry Nation as professional writer in the context of the development of the TV series from the 1950s onwards.

Actually, I’m not sure Alwyn Turner’s title is correct, questions ROGER LEWIS. It would seem to me that Tony Hancock invented the Daleks, not Terry Nation. After Hancock fell out with his regular scriptwriters, Ray Galton and Alan Simpson, Nation was hired as a general dogsbody and amanuensis - and though the sci-fi sketch they devised together was never made, it was Hancock who dreamed up the idea of these absurd androids, ‘an inverted cone, covered with ping-pong balls and with a sink plunger sticking out of its. head’.

The Daleks are one of the most iconic and fearsome creations in television history. Sold by Better World Books. W. Turner's book tells the entire fascinating and immersive story. Since their first appearance in 1963. Condition: Used: Very Good. the author has done a remarkable job with this book and fans of TV and Doctor Who will much enjoy it. Well worth purchasing'. with informed opinion and analysis of all Nation's work, Turner's book is pretty much essential reading not only for anyone with an interest in Doctor Who and its most famous monstrous creations but also anyone interested in the history of British TV.

Turner Alwyn W. Год: 2011. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Man Who Japed. Dick Philip K. Год: 2013.

An extract from: Alwyn w. turner terry nation - the . They sprang from the imagination of Terry Nation, a failed stand-up comic who became one of the most prolific writers for television that Britain has ever produced. turner terry nation - the man who invented the daleks the biography read by david troughton. The Daleks are one of the most iconic and fearsome creations in television history. Survivors, his vision of a post-apocalyptic England, so haunted audiences in the Seventies that the BBC revived it over thirty years on, and Blake’s 7, constantly rumoured for return, endures as a cult sci-fi classic.

Terry Nation, a prolific science fiction and fantasy adventure scriptwriter, was responsible for most of them. His life as a storyteller and his legacy as a mythmaker animates this history of pulp screen classics (Dr Who, Blake’s 7, Survivors, The Avengers, The Saint), which, like the Daleks, keep coming back to taunt and terrify us. The Man Who Invented the Daleks: The Strange Worlds of Terry Nation, by Alwyn W. Turner (Aurum, £20 344pp).

Alwyn W Turner - The Man Who Invented the Daleks- The Strange Worlds of Terry Nation (retail) (epub). I'm looking for: Показать полность. he 'Doctor Who and the Daleks' omnibus, specifically the comic/puzzle titled "Invasion"

Alwyn W Turner - The Man Who Invented the Daleks- The Strange Worlds of Terry Nation (retail) (epub). he 'Doctor Who and the Daleks' omnibus, specifically the comic/puzzle titled "Invasion". The Radio Times advertising 'Dimensions in Time,' from 20-26 November 1993. If anyone could help, I'd be very greatful!

Obituary: Terry Nation – The Man who Invented the Daleks". Turner, Alwyn . The Man Who Invented The Daleks: The Strange Worlds of Terry Nation, London: Aurum Press, 2011

Obituary: Terry Nation – The Man who Invented the Daleks". The Guardian, 13 March 1997. Terry Nation on IMDb. The Man Who Invented The Daleks: The Strange Worlds of Terry Nation, London: Aurum Press, 2011, ISBN 978-1-84513-609-3. Terry Nation at the BFI's Screenonline. Terry Nation at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Terry Nation profile, Museum of Broadcast Communications, museum.

Terry Nation was one of the most successful writers for television to come out of Britain.

Terry Nation was one of the most successful, prolific, and celebrated writers for popular television that Britain ever produced. His late 1970s science fiction series Survivors and Blake's 7 have been durable, cult and critical hits, both being remade 30 years later. His most famous creations, the Daleks, ensured, and at times eclipsed, the success of Doctor Who. Indeed, almost half a century after their first appearance in 1963, new additions to Dalek mythology continue to be made, while the word itself has entered the Oxford English Dictionary, passing into the language as the name of the most famous race of aliens in fiction. While his science fiction work remains at the core of his appeal, Nation also had a role to play in the early days of radio and television comedy—as part of the legendary Associated London Scripts, he wrote for Spike Milligan, Tony Hancock, and Frankie Howerd—and in the internationally successful adventure series of the 1960s: The Avengers, The Saint, The Persuaders!, and others. This account of his life and contributions will shed light on a fascinating melting pot of ambitious young writers, producers, and performers without whom British culture today would look very different.
Comments: (3)
invasion
Strictly speaking this isn’t a biography of Terry Nation and in truth it isn’t marketed as such. It’s ‘The man who invented the Daleks’. If you are looking for information on Terry Nation as a person then this really isn’t the book for you and there isn’t one anyway. Any references to the personal life of the man are few and far between and are largely culled from interviews he gave for Horizon magazine which was the fan mag for Blakes 7. There is no claim anywhere in the book that this is a revelatory biography about him. It is very much a book of his professional writing life and the contribution he made to popular TV culture from the 1960s to the 1990s. His contributions are put in a wider context of the development of comedy and science fiction on TV.

In reality, from reading between the lines it would seem that Terry Nation is not really biography material. By all accounts of those who worked with him he was an affable family man who worked hard. He stayed married to the one woman all his life, wasn’t an alcoholic or drug user (although he was a chronic smoker which eventually killed him). He wasn’t a womaniser, gambler or obnoxious to all around him like Hancock or Waugh. So far so bad for a biographer. The further reading section on page 331 isn’t very extensive reflecting how much he kept a low profile although he was very protective of his Daleks and their image. Most of that protective work was carried out in conversations and correspondence with officials at the BBC and not in the public domain. His one overriding professional goal was to be the series writer of a popular TV show and he was thwarted on many occasions largely due to the collective nature of TV productions which have so many layers of management and creative departments that one man‘s will – and in particular the writer’s script – is only one part of a much wider experience. He largely achieved this with Blake’s 7 but failed with The Outsiders. He only kept control over the Daleks by a fluke in his contract with the BBC at the time. No other writer was in that position and made money independently of writing for a series.
The book is well written and very well researched and throws a lot of light on the background of the role of the script writers who – prior to Nation – were largely just names on the credits list. He was able to bring the writers out from the shadows.

Reading the book will not give you a deeper insight into Terry Nation as a man but it will give you a wider understanding of Terry Nation as professional writer in the context of the development of the TV series from the 1950s onwards.
RUL
This review is 2 parts - the first about the book style and organization and the second is about the subject matter

In regards to the actual layout and organization of this book, I give it four out of five stars - being a biography, there was very little in the area of youth of Terry Nation, but it did focus on his time as a writer and what led him to becoming a writer - there were a few times when I felt that the information was repetitive but then other times it went into great detail, which I liked - examples were given, though, these were the victim of repeats as well - as a book and a biography, I would say that this is worth the four stars based solely on the format and layout and information provided ...

as for the second half of this reveiw - if this were based on the subject of the book, I would give this one star - Terry Nation is given the credit for creating the Daleks, when in fact there were several people involved, but he did have the basic concept and the name and he made a ton of money on his creation, though he had little actual dealings with Doctor Who, he did not even like the program (from my interpretations) and his time could not be spared to write scripts for his Dalek's, so other writers wrote the stories, and Terry Nation complained - honestly, from everything provided about Terry Nation, he was not a very creative man, stealing story ideas from his friends, coworkers, and even himself, though he is still known as the man that created the Daleks -

I am w huge Whovian, and I am disappointed in finding out that the man that created one of the biggest villains in history did so with half care because he wanted to work on other projects, and he never gave the due time to his own creation - the people in the bio talk about how creative Terry Nation was, yet example after example shows that he truly was not and that the Daleks was more of luck over talent -

This Bio is well written, but I left the book not only not liking Terry Nation as a person, but feeling angry that he got so rich off of a creation that he never truly cared for.
Vit
It's a peculiar experience to read a biography of someone whom you used to know. While Mr. Turner has done an admirable job of examining Terry Nation's career-- I cannot fault him on his attention to detail-- I regret to say that who Terry actually was seems to have eluded him, and as a result the reader cannot form anything other than a vague and bloodless impression.

This is a real loss since Terry was an incredibly charismatic man armed with a wicked wit and a keen penetrating intellect. Terry was the funniest person I have ever known. He was also a troubled soul, but out of compassion and the love I have for him I hesitate to go further than that. Maybe no one wants to know this sort of thing anyway. Few of Terry's demons make even a cameo appearance in this book apart from a glimpse or two of his formidable temper and his ruthless streak; the rest is silence. De mortuis nil nisi bonum dicendum est, I guess.

Still, a diverting informative read for fans of Doctor Who and other classic British television.