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eBook Emperor in the Roman World download

by Fergus Millar

eBook Emperor in the Roman World download ISBN: 0715617222
Author: Fergus Millar
Publisher: Bristol Classical Press; 0002-New edition (August 20, 1992)
Language: English
Pages: 656
ePub: 1214 kb
Fb2: 1851 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf docx mbr rtf
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Fergus Millar's book on the Roman emperor is the main resource on this topic. If you have any interest in the varied roles and attributes of Roman emperors, then you should include this book in your personal library.

Fergus Millar's book on the Roman emperor is the main resource on this topic. It analyzes the position of the emperor in relation to various other topics. These topics vary from the functions of the emperor to the emperor's companions to his relations with the cities and senate.

Start by marking Emperor in the Roman World as Want to Read .

Start by marking Emperor in the Roman World as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book offers a large scale reassessment of the function of Roman emperor over three centuries (from Augustus to Constantine) and of the social realities of this exercise of power.

In 1977 the historian Fergus Millar, who has died aged 84, published a massive book, The Emperor in the Roman World, that got to grips in an entirely original way with the institutional character of the empire and the role of its head of state. Based in large part on an encyclopedic knowledge of Roman law, Millar’s analysis showed in detail how a great empire actually functioned, with effective leadership and multifarious modes of communication.

Millar, Fergus (1977). The Emperor in the Roman World, 31 BC–AD 337. Cornell University Press. Professor Fergus Millar staff page at the Faculty of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford. Journal of Jewish Studies announcement of "History of the Jewish People in the Age of Jesus Christ.

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Fergus Millar is one of the most influential contemporary historians of the ancient world

Fergus Millar is one of the most influential contemporary historians of the ancient world. His essays and books, including The Emperor in the Roman World and The Roman Near East, have enriched our understanding of the Greco-Roman world in fundamental ways. In his writings Millar has made the inhabitants of the Roman Empire central to our conception of how the empire functioned. Fergus Millar is one of the most influential contemporary historians of the ancient world.

This book offers a large scale reassessment of the function of Roman emperor over three centuries (from Augustus to Constantine) and of the social realities of this exercise of power.

Fergus Millar is one of the most influential contemporary historians of the ancient world. His essays and books, above all The Emperor in the Roman World and The Roman Near East, have transformed our understanding of the communal culture and civil government of the Greco-Roman world.

This book offers a large scale reassessment of the function of Roman emperor over three centuries (from Augustus to Constantine) and of the social realities of this exercise of power. Concentrating on the patterns of communication between the emperor and his subjects, the author shows that such communications were normally initiated by the subjects – whether grouped in cities or other associations, or individually and that the emperor fulfilled his role primarily by making responses to them or giving decisions or verdicts between them.

The book casts new light on a number of detailed historical questions such as the sources of the emperor's wealth and the ways he spent it; the imperial residences and the mobility of the court; and the relatively small and simple entourage that the emperor needed to perform his functions. But above all, it emphasizes two major historical themes: the steady detachment of the emperor from the republican institutions of the city of Rome; and the way in which relations between Emperor and Church were shaped by the emperor's long-standing relations with cities, temples and associations in the pagan world.

Drawing on a wide range of evidence, from literature and legal writings to inscriptions and papyri, the main text can be read without any knowledge o f Latin or Greek.

Comments: (4)
Visonima
Surely the best take on this subject, but the book is gigantic size, makes it hard to read in bed
Yggfyn
Just great. I really can't recommend this highly enough. Well written and absolutely dense with detail and sources.
Mr_NiCkNaMe
Fergus Millar's book on the Roman emperor is the main resource on this topic. It analyzes the position of the emperor in relation to various other topics. These topics vary from the functions of the emperor to the emperor's companions to his relations with the cities and senate. These chapters cover topics related to the emperor such as imperial capitals, his advisers, his relationship with local councils, and the church. This book is intended as a corrective to previous books which he feels didn't adequately describe what the emperor did but instead described what they thought he should do. Thus this book goes back to the basics and provides examples from countless sources from across the Roman world.

Whether you accept his arguments or not will depend largely on what you think of his use of sources. While he has a wider ranging knowledge of the sources than seems possible he offers no analysis or consideration of them treating largely fictitious documents like the HA (or even Vergil) with as much seriousness as the major historians and inscriptions. He never really compares the accuracy of sources so much as lists examples from them that suit his thesis. To make clear my position I feel that he offers a lot of useful information and good ideas, but that a thorough knowledge of the sources is required beforehand. Sometimes fictitious sources can be used to prove a point if that point has to do with contemporary perceptions, but I am not convinced much of the time that his use of them is appropriate. Each example he uses must be judged based on your knowledge of that source and its relevance to the current topic. Not that non-professionals can't get much of value from this, but I'd be recommend when using any of his examples to check the nature of the source first.

But whether or not this is the best way of using sources it seems hard to argue with his conclusions. I disagree with some of them of course (just because people wanted emperors to respond to petitions doesn't mean they always did, nor that their responses were done personally) but on the whole his work is solid. It isn't exactly an easy read, but if you use it correctly it is an invaluable source. I would recommend though that you read this in conjunction with Campbell's The Emperor and the Roman Army since Millar doesn't mention soldiers in his book.
Crazy
If you have any interest in the varied roles and attributes of Roman emperors, then you should include this book in your personal library. After seeing this book appear in the bibliographies of so many notable histories of the Roman Empire, I had to check it out. Now I refer to it often in my research. It covers everything from Imperial palaces, to the Praetorian Guards and German bodyguard, freedmen secretaries, Imperial treasury and wealth, relationships to the senate, the Emperor as Judge, etc. It ranges from Augustus to Constantine.