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eBook Reluctant Modernism: American Thought and Culture, 1880-1900 (Twayne's American Thought and Culture Series) download

by George Cotkin

eBook Reluctant Modernism: American Thought and Culture, 1880-1900 (Twayne's American Thought and Culture Series) download ISBN: 0805790543
Author: George Cotkin
Publisher: Twayne Pub; First Edition edition (January 1, 1992)
Language: English
Pages: 188
ePub: 1786 kb
Fb2: 1440 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: doc lrf lit mbr
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Start by marking Reluctant Modernism: American Thought And Culture, 1880-1900 (Twayne's .

Start by marking Reluctant Modernism: American Thought And Culture, 1880-1900 (Twayne's American Thought and Culture Series) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. His story begins with the Darwinian controversies, since the mainstream of American culture was just beginning to come to grips with the implications of the Origins of Species, published in 1859. Cotkin demonstrates the effects of this shift in thinking on philosophy, anthropology, and the newly developing field of psychology.

In the last two decades of the 19th century, Americans were trying to assimilate the new ideas of modernism. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

In Reluctant Modernism: American Thought and Culture, 1880–1900 (New York: Twayne, 1992), George Cotkin also discusses Boas’s rejection of overarching delineations of evolutionary progress (59–63). 34. For a thoughtful examination of realism in the American theater, see Brenda Murphy, American Realism and American Drama, 1880–1940 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987).

Homefront: American Thought and Culture, 1860-1880 George Cotkin, Reluctant Modernism: American Thought and Culture, 1880-1900 Daniel Borus, Twentieth-Century Multiplicity: American Thought and Culture, 1900-1920 Terry Cooney, Balancing Acts: American Thought an. .

Homefront: American Thought and Culture, 1860-1880 George Cotkin, Reluctant Modernism: American Thought and Culture, 1880-1900 Daniel Borus, Twentieth-Century Multiplicity: American Thought and Culture, 1900-1920 Terry Cooney, Balancing Acts: American Thought and Culture in the 1930s William Graebner, The Age of Doubt: American Thought and Culture in the 1940s. 5. Casey Blake, Daniel Borus, and Howard Brick, At the Cen-ter: American Thought and Culture in the Mid-Twentieth Cen-tury, 1948-1963 (forthcoming).

Reluctant Modernism: American Thought and Culture, 1880–1900. Disobedient geographies and subaltern cultures. This paper challenges these. positions as inaccurate representations of the Yoruba African understanding of the nature of evil. It exposes the conceptual errors that fraught Oduwole's paper and provides further rigorous analytical expositions of the nature of evil in Yoruba-African philosophical thought.

It was a famous American legal case in 1925. Cotkin, George (2004). Reluctant modernism: American thought and culture, 1880–1900. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 978-0-7425-3746-0. A substitute high school teacher, John Scopes, was accused of violating Tennessee's Butler Act. This Act made it unlawful to teach human evolution in any state-funded school. Scopes was unsure whether he had ever actually taught evolution, but he purposely incriminated himself so that the case could have a defendant.

American Thought and Culture, 1880–1900. The Postmodernist Turn

American Thought and Culture, 1880–1900. The Postmodernist Turn. American Thought and Culture in the 1970s. By J. David Hoeveler. Twentieth-Century Multiplicity. American Thought and Culture, 1900–1920. Over twenty years ago, this series on American Thought and Culture began with the aim of offering concise, provocative volumes that, taken together, would survey the long span of American intellectual and cultural life from the sixteenth century to the present. Since then, the output of richly documented monographs in the field has continued to grow, sustaining the demand for inventive historical syntheses.

George Cotkin is a professor of history at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo. He is the author of Reluctant Modernism: American Thought and Culture, 1880-1900 and William James, Public Philosopher, the latter published by Johns Hopkins. Библиографические данные.

American modernism, much like the modernism movement in general, is a trend of philosophical thought arising from the widespread changes in culture and society in the age of modernity.

In the last two decades of the nineteenth century Americans were faced with the challenges--and the uncertainties--of a new era. The comfortable Victorian values of continuity, progress, and order clashed with the unsettling modern notions of constant change, relative truth, and chaos. Attempting to embrace the intellectual challenges of modernism, American thinkers of the day were yet reluctant to welcome the wholesale rejection of the past and destruction of traditional values.In Reluctant Modernism: American Thought and Culture, 1880-1900, George Cotkin surveys the intellectual life of this crucial transitional period. His story begins with the Darwinian controversies, since the mainstream of American culture was just beginning to come to grips with the implications of the Origin of Species, published in 1859. Cotkin demonstrates the effects of this shift in thinking on philosophy, anthropology, and the newly developing field of psychology. Drawing upon his extensive knowledge of these fields, he explicates, in terms easily accessible to the general reader the essential tenets of such major thinkers and writers as William James, Franz Boas, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Henry Adams, and Kate Chopin.Cotkin devotes careful consideration to the underlying assumptions of racism that culminated in the `separate but equal' doctrine, the struggles of women to combat the pseudoscientific arguments relegating them to the domestic sphere, and the attempts of self-appointed custodians of culture to create a morally improving public culture that would counteract the decadent influence of consumerism.