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by Alessandro Barbero

eBook The Day of the Barbarians: The Battle That Led to the Fall of the Roman Empire download ISBN: 0802715710
Author: Alessandro Barbero
Publisher: Walker Books; 1st Edition edition (April 3, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1468 kb
Fb2: 1797 kb
Rating: 4.8
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Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Alessandro Barbero's "Day Of The Barbarians" chronicles the events surrounding the battle of Adrianople in AD 378 including the lead-in to the battle, the aftermath of the battle and the strategic situation after the battle

Alessandro Barbero's "Day Of The Barbarians" chronicles the events surrounding the battle of Adrianople in AD 378 including the lead-in to the battle, the aftermath of the battle and the strategic situation after the battle. Many historians look at Adrianople as a watershed event in the history of the Roman Empire and this aspect is also analyzed. This is a concise history of the period and events. Barbero begins with the situation in the empire and its relationship with the barbarians - sometimes enemies, sometimes a source of soldiers.

Having just finished Alessandro Barbero's book The Day of the . In autumn of 376, barbarians massed along the northern shores of the Danube.

Having just finished Alessandro Barbero's book The Day of the Barbarians: The Battle That Led to the Fall of the Roman Empire, I think that it is a worthy contribution to the historical literature of the era - though I think that Barbero would most likely not agree with the subtitle that the publishers attached to his book. As he writes regarding the aftermath of the battle of The more I look around at the world political situation, the more interested I become in the later Roman Empire.

existed on the other side of the broad Danube making permanent agreements with the Roman Empire. In fact, the habit as well as the necessity of negotiating with the empire.

existed on the other side of the broad Danube. and most dangerous temptation: The barbarians had learned that once they started to play that game, sooner or later, the Romans. making permanent agreements with the Roman Empire. may have induced the Goths to organize their tribes into more numerous federations, which in turn resulted in the emergence. of leaders who were no longer mere tribal leaders but princes, or "kinglets," as the Romans called them.

The Day of the Barbarians: The Battle That Led to the Fall of the Roman Empire is a 2007 nonfiction book by Alessandro Barbero about the Battle of Adrianople. After two centuries in which the "barbarians" were successfully integrated in the. After two centuries in which the "barbarians" were successfully integrated in the Roman Empire, a particular episode seems to set the end of this age. Due to corruption and bad organization of the migration phenomenon, the Roman Empire started its fall after this sigle-day battle, which saw the goths immigrants taking over the roman army.

In 2005, the Republic of France awarded Barbero with the title of "Chevalier de l'ordre des Arts et des Lettres". The Day of the Barbarians: The Battle That Led to the Fall of the Roman Empire, Walker Books (2007). Storia di Waterloo, Laterza (2003)

In 2005, the Republic of France awarded Barbero with the title of "Chevalier de l'ordre des Arts et des Lettres". Bella vita e guerre altrui di Mr. Pyle, gentiluomo (1995). Beautiful Life and Foreign Wars of Mr. Pyle, Gentleman (1995). Fiutando i futuri supplizi (1998). Storia di Waterloo, Laterza (2003). The Battle: A New History of Waterloo, Walker & Co (2003). Le Ateniesi, Mondadori Libri (2015).

by. Barbero, Allessandro; Cullen,John translator. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on August 26, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

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An excellent true narrative on the history of the Goths and the Eastern Roman Empire. The climax of the book revolves around the battle of Adrianople where the "Roman" army was soundly defeated, about 100 miles from Constantinople.

An excellent true narrative on the history of the Goths and the Eastern Roman Empire. By this time the Goths were so deeply established in both the "Roman" army and the opposing army that it truly was a Gothic. da. othic mercenaries,"early arrivals" to the Roman Empire fighting,"johnny come lately" Goths fresh across the Danube with their wagons,ironically ferried across by a Roman Gothic Army.

Barbero A. Number of Pages. Walker & Company. barbarians, battle, Edirne, Goths, Visigoths.

On August 9, 378 AD, at Adrianople in the Roman province of Thrace (now western Turkey), the Roman Empire began to fall. Two years earlier, an unforeseen flood of refugees from the East Germanic tribe known as the Goths had arrived at the Empire's eastern border, seeking admittance. Though usually successful in dealing with barbarian groups, in this instance the Roman authorities failed. Gradually coalesced into an army led by Fritigern, the barbarian horde inflicted on Emperor Valens the most disastrous defeat suffered by the Roman army since Hannibal's victory at Cannae almost 600 years earlier. The Empire did not actually fall for another century, but some believe this battle signaled nothing less than the end of the ancient world and the start of the Middle Ages.

With impeccable scholarship and narrative flair, renowned historian Alessandro Barbero places the battle in its historical context, chronicling the changes in the Roman Empire, west and east, the cultural dynamics at its borders, and the extraordinary administrative challenge in holding it together. Vividly recreating the events leading to the clash, he brings alive leaders and common soldiers alike, comparing the military tactics and weaponry of the barbarians with those of the disciplined Roman army as the battle unfolded on that epic afternoon. Narrating one of the turning points in world history, The Day of the Barbarians is military history at its very best.

Comments: (7)
Ichalote
Alessandro Barbero's "Day Of The Barbarians" chronicles the events surrounding the battle of Adrianople in AD 378 including the lead-in to the battle, the aftermath of the battle and the strategic situation after the battle. Many historians look at Adrianople as a watershed event in the history of the Roman Empire and this aspect is also analyzed.

This is a concise history of the period and events. Barbero begins with the situation in the empire and its relationship with the barbarians - sometimes enemies, sometimes a source of soldiers. The author correctly begins with asiatic horsemen pushing westward, forcing the Gothic peoples, after several battles, to seek safety withing the Roman Empire. The Emperor agrees to allow the Gothic groups into the Empire to serve as soldiers. Unfortunately, the corrupt Roman officials charged with assisting, feeding and supporting the Goths decide to rob them and make slaves of them. The Goths them rebel at their treatment, leading ultimately to the destruction of entire swaths of the Empire and the destruction of the best Roman armies.

The author does a good job of recounting events, showing actions of all parties as well as can be ascertained with so few ancient sources to draw from, giving a cogent retelling of events with informed speculation. The book is short and concise and I take a star away because the author didn't make the story as interesting as it should have been.

A good resource on the battle and the times, but not a fun ride. Four stars.
Qusserel
Despite the title, this is actually a very well-managed account of both the histories of the Late Roman and Gothic peoples, and their collision course during the Adrianople campaign. To his credit, the author fully acknowledges the source limitations of this era (as far as I know, Ammianus Marcellinus wrote the only surviving scholarly account of the clash). However, with this minimal information, Barbero explores the political motivations of Valens and Fritigern, analyzes military tactics and illuminates the often forgotten but crucial political apathy and paranoia felt amongst the Roman citizenry during this era. If there are any weaknesses, they lie with Barbero's unwillingness to admit that the Late Roman army was obviously either less effective or durable than that of the Republic and Principate. He makes multiple allusions to Cannae, but then fails to fully explain why the Romans, who once rebounded to fight a three front war against Carthage, failed to triumph against the Gothic invasion. However, the author is exceptional in stressing the demographic pressures that the Roman administrative caste felt throughout this era. For various reasons, the Roman Empire felt that it needed barbarian immigrants, and then botched the operation through incompetence, callous corruption, and military weakness.
Zacki
The story of the Gothic War and the famous Battle of Adrianople has often been re-constructed, for example by Gibbon (1776) and more recently by Peter Heather The Fall of the Roman Empire (2005) and Michael Kulikowski Rome's Gothic Wars (2006) - what makes this account special is not any new over-arching theory, but simply a well researched, reliable and very well told story - if writing history is a type of literature, this is literature at its best. Barbero has the ability to fire the imagination and make it all real - he can take a single sentence from Ammianus Marcellinus (the primary source for the events) and draw in other related material to fill in the details to make a book-length retelling where others have a chapter or two. As Steven Coats said, reviewing in the New York Times (April 29, 2007), this is an "elegant and pleasurable little account - what a joy it is to read about the ancient world in digestible portions." This is clearly a book for the general reader, but Barbero is a medieval scholar, it contains supporting footnotes (which are worthwhile) and references to further reading. I never tire of reading about this story, it brings together so many elements of the ancient and medieval worlds, it was one of the pivotal moments in world history and also one of the most dramatic.

With all the praise above and 5-stars, a couple things about what the book is not: 1) this is a short book, 147 pages of actual text, the rest is footnotes 2) it is not for specialists or experts - Barbero does not go into too much chronological or geographic detail - it is not a definitive scientific study 3) the question if Adrianople was the dividing line between the Ancient and Medieval world is thankfully relegated to the Preface and last two pages, a "hook" I suppose. The books real value is in the skillful narration of events, and understanding the process of the 'barbarization' of the Roman Empire.
Washington
The leitmotiv of this book is the Battle of Adrianople but it goes beyond it. It analyzes the integration of the Barbarians into the Roman Empire and ultimately its demise at their hands.

The battle itself is just a turning point in the sense that too many Roman soldiers were killed, and therefore that manpower had to be replaced with the Barbarians. The battle also generated a deep mistrust in the Goths which made their integration into the professional army complicated. Instead, whole regiments of Goths and other Barbarians were hired as mercenaries and this weakened its blend, ultimately leading to the sack of Rome and the rest of the known story.

We also see how the relationship between the Barbarian tribes and the Empire was much more organically integrated than we usually think. The Empire had already absorbed many generations of Barbarians and most of them (first and second generation) were completely romanized and hellenized. The fall of the Western Roman Empire is not, therefore, just a case of internal collapse and moral decay. Great short study on a captivating period that brings new light to these open questions.