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eBook Ideas: General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology (Muirhead Library of Philosophy) (Volume 43) download

by Edmund Husserl

eBook Ideas: General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology (Muirhead Library of Philosophy) (Volume 43) download ISBN: 0415295440
Author: Edmund Husserl
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (August 17, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 464
ePub: 1280 kb
Fb2: 1495 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lit docx lit doc
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Muirhead Library of Philo. has been added to your Cart. Reading Husserlian phenomenology is quite the uplifting experience of "lightness", perhaps simply relative to some other approaches to describing the root of subjective experience.

Muirhead Library of Philo. Very insightful stuff and a good starting point to his catalogue.

The Muirhead Library of Philosophy was an influential series which . Edmund Husserl, Ideas: General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology.

The Muirhead Library of Philosophy was an influential series which published some of the best writings of twentieth century philosophy. The original programme was drawn up by John Muirhead and published in Erdmann's History of Philosophy in 1890. A. H. Johnson, Experiential Realism. Joel Kupperman, Ethical Knowledge.

Under the title A Pure or Transcendental Phenomenology, the work here presented seeks to found a new science-though, indeed, the whole course of philosophical development since Descartes has been preparing the way for it-a science covering a new f. .

Under the title A Pure or Transcendental Phenomenology, the work here presented seeks to found a new science-though, indeed, the whole course of philosophical development since Descartes has been preparing the way for it-a science covering a new field of experience, exclusively its own, that of Transcendental Subjectivity.

Author: Edmund Husserl. Title: Ideas: General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology (Muirhead Library of Philosophy). No genres by users yet.

The Muirhead Library of Philosophy was an influential series which published some of the best writings of.G. E. Moore, Philosophical Papers. Brand Blanshard, The Nature of Thought. The original programme was drawn up by John Muirhead and published in Erdmann s History of Philosophy in 1890. Brand Blanshard, Reason and Analysis.

Start by marking Ideas: General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology (Muirhead Library of Philosophy) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

First published in 2002. Start by marking Ideas: General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology (Muirhead Library of Philosophy) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

Book Source: Digital Library of India Item 2015. author: Edmund Husserl d. ate. classification: Literature d. itle: Ideas(general Introduction To Pure Phenomenology). te: 2007-06-18 d. citation: 1931 d. dentifier. origpath: d/0111/221 d. copyno: 1 d.

Edmund Husserl, F. Kersten. The present translation draws upon nearly half a century of Husserl scholarship as well as the many translations into English of other books by Husserl, occasioned by . Boyce Gibson’s pioneering translation of Ideas, First Book, in 1931.

outline some of Husserl ’ s major contributions to the philosophy of. mind.

Prof Moran was awarded the Royal Irish Academy Gold. Medal in the Humanities in 2012. Ronald Planer is a doctoral student in philosophy at Rutgers. University, New Brunswick. outline some of Husserl ’ s major contributions to the philosophy of. 3. Phenomenology, understood as the careful description of. experiences in the manner in which they are experienced by the.

Электронная книга "Ideas: General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology", Edmund Husserl. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Ideas: General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Comments: (7)
Delirium
The texture of the cover is a new type to me, very sturdy and good grip. The text is exactly that of 1913 English edition.
Gaiauaco
Edmund Husserl's classic is a must read for everyone interested in Mind in Life, phenomenology and/or modern philosophy. The translation by Boyce Gibson is very good and very readable. The inclusion of the original German terminology does help a lot to distinguish between intentions that are hard to translate into English.
Darkshaper
I had a serious thirst for understanding Husserl, Heidegger's historical influence, and I'm extremely glad I have this chance to understand the unique and foundational perspective he contributed to 20th century philosophy and human self-understanding. One gets the impression from the debate that existed that there was a foundational difference, but reading this book has made it clear to me that Husserl was only disappointed in Heidegger because he viewed his "anthropological" dissertation as a distraction from his own unique psychological attitude and perspective. Husserl's "idealist" point of view is not only important for its own value, but for the light it shines on topics like dualism, empiricism, Descartes, Kant, and the history of modern philosophy.
Elastic Skunk
Interesting read, although I found I had to read it in small doses. It was a lot to digest. However, I fully recommend to anyone who is writing a phenomenology or just plain interested in making sense of human experience.
Unsoo
HUSSERL, PONTY, AND BEAUFRET: THE THREE GIANTS OF POST-MODERN ERA:

Edmund Husserl is considered the father of phenomenology, and also as a major contributor to the substrate of post- modern philosophy. Without a doubt, his thought in “Ideas” is profoundly evident as the structure for much of Heidegger’s, Ponty’s, and Beaufret’s thought. Therefore, any student of post-modern thought will find this manuscript absolutely essential to read and assimilate. Assimilating the material may take some doing. Husserl is difficult; but not impossible. He is just extremely detailed, and you must carefully track his concepts and their use.

Husserl tells us that the study of “Being” cannot begin until after the pure-experience work of describing “modalities-of-being”. Then the self may transition to the study of “being”. To assist the reader, I will give you the “4” modalities of his procedure. Keep these in mind as you read: 1. the “primordial-modality” of “epoche” (suspension of conceptualization); 2. The remembrance-modality of the “noetic”; 3. The imaginative-modality of the “eidetic”; and 4. The signifying-modality of the “doxic”.
The self must work “descriptively” through the first three modalities, and then work through a transformation in the fourth modality of the “doxic”. The doxa-modality asks the self to work through “recollection and subtracting” in order to arrive at the “proto-doxa” that have been present all along. These “proto-doxa” consist of the core-noema resulting from the on-going interrogation of the self from an existential stand-point. Through a process of negating the modality-content in previous moments, the self can arrive at the pure doxa content. The noematic-object passes through negation of modality-content to become pure-noema-character. And this character”, in turn is copied as a doxa-sign by consciousness. The self “stands-in” to consider the relational aspects of this new modified domain in order to form the ideological structure. Like I said; it is there, and understandable, but requires slow and careful reading.
I consider this manuscript “mandatory” for anyone studying post-modern thought, but Husserl is certainly not limited to just that interest. 5 stars and “good luck”
Xirmiu
Just fabulous! Thanks for the care that went into sending the book. It was evident.
Jim
Wenaiand
Excellent service and product!!! Thank you!!!
I won't get into the merits of the book; it's important, but you're likely to read it because you're required to rather than for pleasure. I will only say that the old Gibson translation, reprinted here, is surprisingly superior to the more recent and seemingly more scholarly Kersten translation. Just to illustrate: on p. 81, Gibson has "But this view is nonsensical." Kersten has "But this view is a countersense." There's no powerful reason to prefer a noun over an adjective here, and even if you felt a compulsion to because that is what the German offers (but German is constantly offering nouns where we would not!) what would've been wrong with "But this view is an absurdity"? Obviously Kersten thought that preserving the parallels with the various other uses of "sense" was important (debatable) but then Gibson's approach is the right one.

This may seem pedantic, but Kersten's use of neologism for perfectly ordinary German words leads to an excruciatingly impenetrable prose; my example is but one of many. Save yourself from hours of aggravation falsely assuming it's you and not the text, and get Routledge's--this one--instead.