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eBook Confucianism (Ancient Philosophies) download

by Paul Goldin

eBook Confucianism (Ancient Philosophies) download ISBN: 1844651789
Author: Paul Goldin
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (July 24, 2015)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1484 kb
Fb2: 1542 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: doc lit lrf mobi
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

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Paul R. Goldin's new introductory textbook is part of a series on Ancient Philosophies, and therefore focuses almost entirely on classical Confucianism, as the author explains in the Introduction. The entire history of the tradition from the Han through the Qing dynasties occupies six pages in the final chapter. One wonders why the book was not more accurately entitled Classical Confucian Philosophy, especially as a forthcoming book in the series is said to be entitled Classical Islamic Philosophy.

Similar books and articles. Paul Goldin - 2010 - Routledge. A Dialogue Between Ancient Confucianism And Western Anthropocentrism On Environmental Philosophy. John Chuang - 1998 - Philosophy and Culture 25 (9):836-855. Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition II: A Comparative Analysis of Personhood.

Cambridge Core - Ancient Philosophy - Confucianism - by Paul R. Goldin. Confucianism presents the history and salient tenets of Confucian thought, and discusses its viability, from both a social and a philosophical point of view, in the modern world.

Goldin guides readers through the philosophies of the three major classical, Mencius, and Xunzi-as well as two short anonymous treatises, the Great Learning and the Classic of Filial Piety.

This book presents a concise, balanced overview of China's oldest and most revered philosophy. Goldin guides readers through the philosophies of the three major classical, Mencius, and Xunzi-as well as two short anonymous treatises, the "Great Learning" and the "Classic of Filial Piety.

Confucianism largely became the dominant philosophical school of China during . This period is considered the golden age of Chinese philosophy. Confucius taught both positive and negative versions of the Golden Rule.

Confucianism largely became the dominant philosophical school of China during the early Han dynasty following the replacement of its contemporary, the more Taoistic Huang-Lao.

This book presents a concise, balanced overview of China’s oldest and most revered philosophy.

Confucius and Confucianism is barely the most popular philosophy across the world. The ancient Chinese philosophy is common to all schools. This is the cycle of cold and heat, shade and light, feminine and masculine, the yin and yang.

Confucianism (Ancient Philosophies) by Paul R. Goldin

Confucianism (Ancient Philosophies) by Paul R. ePUB reader, 8,1 Mb. Overview: This book presents a concise, balanced overview of China’s oldest and most revered philosophy. Goldin guides readers through the philosophies of the three major classical Confucians―Confucius, Mencius, and Xunzi―as well as two short anonymous treatises, the Great Learning and the Classic of Filial Piety. He also discusses some of the main Neo-Confucian philosophers and outlines transformations Confucianism has undergone in the past century.

"Confucianism" presents the history and salient tenets of Confucian thought, and discusses its viability, from both a social and a philosophical point of view, in the modern world. Despite most of the major Confucian texts having been translated into English, there remains a surprising lack of straightforward textbooks on Confucian philosophy in any Western language. Those that do exist are often oriented from the point of view of Western philosophy - or, worse, a peculiar school of thought within Western philosophy - and advance correspondingly skewed interpretations of Confucianism. This book seeks to rectify this situation. It guides readers through the philosophies of the three major classical Confucians: Confucius (551-479 BCE), Mencius (372-289 BCE?) and Xunzi (fl. 3rd cent. BCE), and concludes with an overview of later Confucian revivals and the standing of Confucianism today.
Comments: (2)
Skunk Black
An excellent introduction to a topic often considered too fundamental to be worth writing about - the evolution of classical Confucianism. Professor Goldin points out that it is surprisingly difficult to come across quality, English-language introductions to confucian thought, a state of affairs that he has here made a great stride toward remedying. This book is short, as should be clear from the Amazon listing, but, with its generous citation of primary sources and lucid explication of the major ideas of Confucius, Mencius, and Xunzi, it nonetheless serves as a compelling guide to early Confucian thinking about people, the state, and the world. Much is made, and rightly so, of the differences between these three great classical Confucian thinkers, however slight they may sometimes seem when looked at in the context of the Warring States period, and by the end of the text, one has a fairly good understanding of the reasons why these thinkers diverged in their philosophical focus. Historical and intellectual context, while not given much separate attention in this volume, are addressed at least in passing in the discussions of each of these philosophers. Intellectual context is responsible in large part, to take the most conspicuous example, for Xunzi's propounding of a full-scale cosmological understanding of the Confucian way, which is sourced from nature itself and pervades all things. Many of his contemporaries had, unlike those of both Confucius and Mencius, been reading the Laozi, and subsequently placing considerable credence in its vision of an all-pervasive and unknowable way (dao). In order to maintain relevance, it was necessary for Xunzi, as it later became necessary for Neo-Confucians confronted with the popularity of Buddhism and Daoism in the 11th century, to propagate a theory that could level with those of competing philosophical traditions and successfully argue for the Confucian understanding of truth, or the right way.
There is also a short chapter that considers the Neo-Confucian movement of the Song, well over a millennium after the last of these classical Confucians, Xunzi, had died, as well as the place of Confucianism in the China of today. This chapter is still lucid and helpful, but is intended not as a complete guide to developments after the classical era, but merely as a small taste of later developments, perhaps goading students into reading more, or at least giving them basic knowledge of the most important intellectual shifts in Confucianism after the classical period.
To conclude, this is a wonderful book that is worthy of more attention than it has received, and is an excellent introduction to a philosophy and a number of philosophical orientations that have characterized much of Chinese civilization since the founding of the Empire. Buy this book!
Shaktiktilar
This was a very enlightening read. Although I personally prefer Western Philosophy I did enjoy reading Confucius. If you are thinking about getting it I highly encourage it.