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eBook The Treason Trials of Aaron Burr (Landmark Law Cases and American Society) download

by Peter Charles Hoffer

eBook The Treason Trials of Aaron Burr (Landmark Law Cases and American Society) download ISBN: 070061592X
Author: Peter Charles Hoffer
Publisher: University Press of Kansas (August 28, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 220
ePub: 1693 kb
Fb2: 1194 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi lrf docx rtf
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

A prolific and insightful chronicler of American legal history, Peter Hoffer once again shows that he is adept at finding timely lessons for today in past cases and controversies. -Edward J. Larson, author of A Magnificent Catastrophe: The Tumultuous Election of 1800, America's First Presidential Campaign.

Landmark Law Cases and American Society). by. Peter Charles Hoffer

Landmark Law Cases and American Society). Peter Charles Hoffer. In the first book dedicated to this important case, Peter Charles Hoffer unveils a cast of characters ensnared by politics and law at the highest levels of government, including President Thomas Jefferson-one of Burr's bitterest enemies-and Chief Justice John Marshall, no fan of either Burr or Jefferson. Hoffer recounts how Jefferson's prosecutors argued that the mere act of discussing an "overt Act of War"-the constitution's definition of treason-was tantamount to committing the act.

Peter Charles Hoffer. Langum Prize, Honorable Mention. Aaron Burr was an enigma even in his own day. Founding father and vice president, he engaged in a duel with Alexander Hamilton resulting in a murder indictment that effectively ended his legal career. And when he turned his attention to entrepreneurial activities on the frontier he was suspected of empire building-and worse. This book is well written and deals very effectively with the confused and confusing charges and evidence against Burr.

Aaron Burr was an enigma even in his own day. Founding father and vice . A fascinating excursion into the early American past, Hoffer's narrative makes it clear why the high court's ultimate finding was so foundational that i. . A fascinating excursion into the early American past, Hoffer's narrative makes it clear why the high court's ultimate finding was so foundational that it has been cited as precedent 383 times.

The accused traitor had been Vice President during the rst administration of Thomas Jefferson. In the summer of 1804, Burr killed his rival Alexander Hamilton in a duel, an event that effectively ended Burr’s career in national politics. Landmark Law Cases & American Society. Walmart 9780700615926. Revisits the dramatic landmark treason case from the early days of the American nation, featuring a famous cast of characters ensnared by politics and law at the highest levels of government, and locked in a struggle for power. University Press of Kansas.

The case against Aaron Burr made him out to be an evil .

The case against Aaron Burr made him out to be an evil, anti-American who wanted nothing but personal power. In actuality Burr was something of a patriot, a loyal believer in democratic society and politics. Now how could a man rise to such upstanding position if he harbored a hate for democracy and American? The answer is he couldn’t, he was a patriot, a valiant figure of n ideals. In one battle his commanding officer was hit my a musket ball and as soon as the General fell.

Landmark Cases in the Law of Contract (2008) is a book by Charles Mitchell and Paul Mitchell, which outlines the key cases in English contract law. The cases discussed are, Coggs v Barnard (1703) on bailment. Pillans v Van Mierop (1765) on the doctrine of consideration. Carter v Boehm (1766) on good faith. Da Costa v Jones (1778). Hochster v De La Tour (1853) on anticipatory breach. Smith v Hughes (1871) on unilateral mistake and the objective approach to interpretation of contracts.

The issue of abortion has sharply divided America. The bitter debate over Roe v. Wade - in the courts, legislatures, press and streets - has grown ever more ferocious since the Supreme Court's landmark decision in 1973

The issue of abortion has sharply divided America. Wade - in the courts, legislatures, press and streets - has grown ever more ferocious since the Supreme Court's landmark decision in 1973. For years pro-choicers have applauded Roe as a guarantee of women's rights, while pro-lifers have condemned it as the work of an activist and atheistic Court.

Actually charged three times with treason, the former vice president was not indicted the first or second time, and though indicted the third time and tried in Richmond in 1807, he was never convicted.

Aaron Burr was an enigma even in his own day. Founding father and vice president, he engaged in a duel with Alexander Hamilton resulting in a murder indictment that effectively ended his legal career. And when he turned his attention to entrepreneurial activities on the frontier he was suspected of empire building—and worse. Burr was finally arrested as a threat to national security, under suspicion of fomenting insurrection against the young republic, and then held without bail for months. His trial, witnessing the unfortunate intrusion of partisan politics and personal animosity into the legal process, revolved around a highly contentious debate over the constitutional meaning of treason. In the first book dedicated to this important case, Peter Charles Hoffer unveils a cast of characters ensnared by politics and law at the highest levels of government, including President Thomas Jefferson—one of Burr's bitterest enemies—and Chief Justice John Marshall, no fan of either Burr or Jefferson. Hoffer recounts how Jefferson's prosecutors argued that the mere act of discussing an "overt Act of War"—the constitution's definition of treason-was tantamount to committing the act. Marshall, however, ruled that without the overt act, no treasonable action had occurred and neither discussion nor conspiracy could be prosecuted. Subsequent attempts to convict Burr on violations of the Neutrality Act failed as well. A fascinating excursion into the early American past, Hoffer's narrative makes it clear why the high court's ultimate finding was so foundational that it has been cited as precedent 383 times. Along the way, Hoffer expertly unravels the tale's major themes: attempts to redefine treason in times of crisis, efforts to bend the law to political goals, the admissibility of evidence, the vulnerability of habeas corpus, and the reach of executive privilege. He also proposes an original and provocative explanation for Burr's bizarre conduct that will provide historians with new food for thought. Deftly linking politics to law, Hoffer's highly readable study resonates with current events and shows us why the issues debated two centuries ago still matter today.
Comments: (3)
HeonIc
I read the negative review above with some surprise. The story of John Marshall and the judiciary as a bulwark against Jefferson, who was apparently intent on inflicting political and personal vengeance on Burr, is spellbinding. Obviously there are other well known examples of Jefferson’s attempts to undermine the judiciary, but this is an exciting tale of refined courtroom jousting in which the rule of law, and the scalawag Burr, ultimately prevail. For which Marshall, unfortunately, is victimized by a partisan press, perhaps more indication of Jefferson’s partisan vengeance. Marshall was so skilled in his role that one fears the direction of constitutional law without him: this book accentuates the point. Given the history of the Supreme Court, I am not sure I am as optimistic as the author that it will resist political tides as successfully as Marshall’s court, but nonetheless well worth the time and energy to read. And, worth the money.
Jay
I'm sorry but I find nothing new in this book. It repeats the same-old, same-old. I feel I wasted my money buying it. (See my review of Buckner Melton's book on the Conspiracy for more info.)
JoJoshura
Hoffer, the editor of this excellent series on "Landmark Cases," has contributed another fine volume to it with his book on the treason trials of Aaron Burr. Evenhanded, lively, and brief, his study draws on the latest historical scholarship to present an account not only good for general readers, but also perfect for use in college courses.