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by Gregory Bateson,Mary Catherine Bateson

eBook Angels Fear: Towards an Epistemology of the Sacred download ISBN: 0553345818
Author: Gregory Bateson,Mary Catherine Bateson
Publisher: Bantam; Second Edition edition (October 1, 1988)
Language: English
ePub: 1328 kb
Fb2: 1838 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: doc azw azw txt
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Gregory Bateson is well known, among those with the perseverance to wrestle through his very compact prose, for his highly original synthesis . This book is the end result of that collaboration, which Mary completed in 1986.

Gregory Bateson is well known, among those with the perseverance to wrestle through his very compact prose, for his highly original synthesis of cybernetics, biology, anthropology and - above all - epistemology. Near the end of his one book written with a general audience in mind (Mind and Nature), he mentions his intention to continue his explorations into the realms of the sacred and the aesthetic.

Gregory Bateson (9 May 1904 – 4 July 1980) was an English anthropologist, social scientist, linguist, visual anthropologist, semiotician and cyberneticist whose work intersected that of many other fields.

Angels Fear is the final sustained thinking of the great Gregory Bateson, written in collaboration with his anthropologist daughter, Mary Catherine Bateson. Here we have set out before us Bateson's natural history of the relationship between ideas

Angels Fear is the final sustained thinking of the great Gregory Bateson, written in collaboration with his anthropologist daughter, Mary Catherine Bateson. Here we have set out before us Bateson's natural history of the relationship between ideas. This book incorporates writing by both father and daughter, including essays written by Gregory in the last years before his death. There are also gues-written since then by Mary Catherine to convey the way the two might have worked together to forge the essays into a single work.

Mary Catherine Bateson (born December 8, 1939) is an American writer and cultural anthropologist. A graduate of the Brearley School, Bateson is the daughter of Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson. Bateson is a noted author in her field with many published monographs. Among her books is With a Daughter's Eye: A Memoir of Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson, a recounting of her upbringing by two famous parents. She has taught at Harvard, Amherst, and George Mason University, among others.

Bateson, Gregory; Bateson, Mary Catherine.

Gregory Bateson spent a bunch of time as a resident at Esalen, and the first 30 pages or so of the book are new-age-y enough that you might be tempted to put it. .Angels Fear immediately called to mind two other books for me.

Gregory Bateson spent a bunch of time as a resident at Esalen, and the first 30 pages or so of the book are new-age-y enough that you might be tempted to put it down pretty quickly, but the majority of the book is quite worthwhile if you’re interested in any of these sundry topics (and especially if you’re interested. in the intersection of these, cross disciplinary thinking).

Here is the long-awaited final work of one of the twentieth century's greatest thinkers. In this groundbreaking book, Gregory Bateson and his daughter, the eminent anthropologist Mary Catherine Bateson, offer a radically new theory of science, supernaturalism and the sacred - and their relationship with the biological world.

Ms Difficult reading, not for browsers; but Bateson-philes and those who hunger for the sacred will find here challenging food for thought.

Bateson states that this book, in progress when her father died, represents a radical step in his thought, a deliberate attempt to yoke the unity of nature affirmed in Mind and Nature with his new understanding of the sacred. As such, she conscientiously demarcates with initials or brackets her own material from her father's. Difficult reading, not for browsers; but Bateson-philes and those who hunger for the sacred will find here challenging food for thought.

The Logic of the Sacred in Bateson and Peirce. Deborah Eicher-Catt - 2003 - American Journal of Semiotics 19 (1/4):95-126. Gregory R. Markowski - 1987 - Tradition and Discovery 15 (2):26-27. Religion: From Place to Placelessness. Yi-fu Tuan - 2009 - the University of Chicago Press. Boghossian’s Fear of Knowledge. Ernest Sosa - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 141 (3):399 - 407. Fear of Knowledge. Paul Boghossian - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 141 (3):391-398. Epistemic Relativism.

Angels Fear: Towards and Epistemology of the Sacred Gregory Bateson Mary Catherine Bateson Bantam . In 1978, my father, Gregory Bateson, completed the book titled Mind and Nature: A Necessary Unity (Dutton, 1979).

Angels Fear: Towards and Epistemology of the Sacred Gregory Bateson Mary Catherine Bateson Bantam Books, November 1987 This book is for LOIS BATESON And BARKEV KASSARJIAN Without them we would not have been ourselves. Full fathom five thy father lies, Of his bones are coral made; Those are pearls that were his eyes: Nothing of him that doth fade, But doth suffer a sea-change Into something rich and strange. Under the threat of imminent death from cancer, he had called me from Tehran to California so we could work on it together.

Discusses mental processes, the role of humans in nature, experience, and the connection between myth, religion, and science
Comments: (7)
Trash
Published many years after his death, this is an important, if not the most important, example of Gregory Bateson's late thinking with carefully indicated and restrained additions from his daughter, Mary Catherine Bateson. An appropriately titled book, referring to the phrase "where Angels fear to tread ..." Angels Fear indeed enters territory angels may fear to enter, that, on retrospect, are present in Bateson's work as early as Steps to an Ecology of Mind, but are backgrounded in favor of his more pressing theses at the time.

However, the core of Angels Fear is intimately connected to Bateson's central thesis in Steps, which is the presentation of an extended conception of what a mind is, and its related epistemology, how that mind is always embodied, and that embodiment in turn is always embedded within a complex ecology that can only be understood via techniques derived from a systems theoretical approach connected to cybernetics and information theory.

Angels Fear's main thrust can be summarized in reference to one of its chapter heads: that Mind is "neither supernatural nor mechanical," that Cartesian Dualism is a dangerous error capable of blinding us to our own ecological disaster. For, as Bateson says elsewhere, if the ecology of a species goes into crisis, extinction of that species becomes probable: if the ecology of that species fails; extinction is certain.

Angels Fear does assume a certain amount of familiarity with the basic concepts of Cybernetics, information theory, and systems thinking that Bateson's earlier work triggered. It assumes no acquaintance with his earlier anthropological or psychological work.

Unfortunately, in spite of their efforts to keep Angels Fear accessible to the general reader, the Bateson's drift into passages that are maddingly obscure and strangely ambiguous. If Gregory wanted to maintain some mystery, he certainly succeeded, or perhaps this is a necessary symptom of the possibility that Bateson himself had not achieved sufficient clarity in his research before he died, and that this is perhaps the reason the book remained unfinished at his death. In this sense, the book is more than a bit unsatisfying in its lack of conclusiveness, but revealing, and a haunting last look into one of the most unusual and creative minds of the last century who was struggling up to his very end to find a way to show the rest of the human race a path to saving itself from itself.
Ubrise
The art at the heart of this entirely scientific and thoroughly literate book is the art at every one of our hearts; we may glimpse this art in ourselves repeatedly when we meditate deeply on questions like: "what really matters most is this life?" and "what do I most yearn for in this life?" and "who are the very most important teachers for navigating the treacherous socio-political swamps into which we have drifted?" and "How might I cultivate both my scientific and my spiritual integrity?" and "How do I fit into Mother Nature's grand scheme so I might best help defend her from the vicious threats imposed by our careless and misguided political, economic, military, religious, academic and scientific elites?

I am so moved by the book I have difficulty composing rational sentences; it calls for highly artful responses to our every moment and from our every breath and exemplifies how as well as describes how we can begin embodying this art.

Perhaps Mary Catherine said it best in the book itself with the book's penultimate chapter: "So What's a Meta For?"

I must soon order some of her own/other books.

As I mentioned in earlier reviews of Gregory Bateson's books, the reading is as challenging as it is rewarding; it is as scientific as it is artful; it is a spiritual oasis in a very rapidly self-destructing culture; it is very much all of these and more.

I am a bit puzzled about why so few contemporary prominent eco-scientists of high public profile ignore (at least in public) this brilliant and compelling science. Some have much admired his work; William Irwin Thompson has praised him highly as did Lynn Margulis some time ago - to mention two examples.

I do understand why the theologians & reverends would not like him. The Batesons (father & daughter) here demonstrate by example as well as by articulate explanation the depths to which they are lost in the very most distant past.
Legend 33
Rereading this after 30 years, I find even greater depth.
Saithinin
Bateson family dialoging, father and daughter, about anthro-cultural matters.
misery
excellent!
Brajind
Excellent book. Very good condition. Price was right. Turnaround was prompt. Couldn't be more pleased.