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by Susan Buck-Morss

eBook Dreamworld and Catastrophe: The Passing of Mass Utopia in East and West download ISBN: 0262024640
Author: Susan Buck-Morss
Publisher: The MIT Press; First Edition edition (May 15, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 390
ePub: 1364 kb
Fb2: 1669 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lit lrf lrf azw
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Buck-Morss's tale of the sputtering, guttering end of the modern Fordist disciplinary project both in the . Dreamworld and Catastrophe' is a cry of anguish disguised as the interdisciplinary analyses of a (neo-)Marxist scholar

Buck-Morss's tale of the sputtering, guttering end of the modern Fordist disciplinary project both in the . A and in the Soviet Union is a stunner. Dreamworld and Catastrophe' is a cry of anguish disguised as the interdisciplinary analyses of a (neo-)Marxist scholar. It is a fragmentary and tortured reaction to the betrayal of history, in the best of Walter Benjamin's tradition, consciously emulated in this tome by this leading authority on the Frankfurt School.

Dreamworld and Catastrophe book. Buck-Morss demonstrates similarities between American and Societ mass culture, making an ective difference to be less significant

Dreamworld and Catastrophe book. Buck-Morss demonstrates similarities between American and Societ mass culture, making an ective difference to be less significant. From the carnival to the show and finally to the cinema masses became more passive and detached from real In the fourth chapter of the book, Susan Buck-Morss, an American follower of the Frankfurt School's first generation, shows how technologies enabled the emergence of masses in the US and the USSR in the first half of the 20th century.

Dreamworld and Catastrophe. The book is in four parts. The Passing of Mass Utopia in East and West. Dreamworlds of Democracy" asks whether collective sovereignty can ever be democratic. Dreamworlds of History" calls for a rethinking of revolution by political and artistic avant-gardes. Susan Buck-Morss is Professor of Political Philosophy and Social Theory, Department of Government, and Professor of Visual Culture, Department of Art History, Cornell University.

The essays in this volume deal with both extremes of mass utopia, dreamworld and catastrophe

This book is an attempt to come to terms with mass dreamworlds at the moment of their passing. The essays in this volume deal with both extremes of mass utopia, dreamworld and catastrophe. The idea of comparing their forms in East and West grew out of a period of close collaboration with Moscow philosophers. From 1988 to 1993 I was a frequent visitor at the Institute of Philosophy of the Soviet (later, Russian) Academy of Sciences, and worked together with a new generation of intellectuals who were critically analyzing Soviet culture as a system of power.

Susan Buck-Morss, Dreamworld and Catastrope: The Passing of Mass Utopia in East and West, 2000.

Susan Buck-Morss is an American philosopher and intellectual historian The Passing of Mass Utopia in East and West (2002). Thinking Past Terror: Islamism and Critical Theory on the Left (2003).

Susan Buck-Morss is an American philosopher and intellectual historian. She is currently Professor of Political Science at the CUNY Graduate Center, and professor emeritus in the Government Department at Cornell University, where she taught from 1978 to 2012. Her interdisciplinary work involves but is not limited to the fields of Art History, Architecture, Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies, German studies, History, Philosophy, and Visual Studies. The Passing of Mass Utopia in East and West (2002). Hegel, Haiti, and Universal History (2009).

Dreamworld and Catastrophe: The Passing of Mass Utopia in East and .

Dreamworld and Catastrophe: The Passing of Mass Utopia in East and West. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. I The events surroundingthe historianand in which he takespart will underlie his presentation like a text written in invisible ink. -Walter Benjaminl The end of the Cold War is the determining moment of this presentation.

and Catastrophe : The Passing of Mass Utopia in East and West. Book Overview Susan Buck-Morss. Thinking Past Terror: Islamism and Critical Theory on the Left.

Dreamworld and Catastrophe : The Passing of Mass Utopia in East and West. The dream of the twentieth century was the construction of mass utopia.

By Susan Buck-Morss Empire. By Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri. Article in Polity 34(4):553-569 · June 2002 with 1 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. Ha publicado su producción crítica y de ensayo en Jorge Cuesta y el demonio de la política (1987), La utopía de la hospitalidad (1993), Tiros en el concierto: literatura mexicana del siglo XX (1997), Servidumbre y grandeza de la vida literaria (1998) y Toda suerte de libros paganos (2001), entre otros.

The dream of the twentieth century was the construction of mass utopia. As the century closes, this dream is being left behind; the belief that industrial modernization can bring about the good society by overcoming material scarcity for all has been challenged by the disintegration of European socialism, capitalist restructuring, and ecological constraints. The larger social vision has given way to private dreams of material happiness and to political cynicism. Developing the notion of dreamworld as both a poetic description of a collective mental state and an analytical concept, Susan Buck-Morss attempts to come to terms with mass dreamworlds at the moment of their passing. She shows how dreamworlds became dangerous when their energy was used by the structures of power as an instrument of force against the masses. Stressing the similarities between the East and West and using the end of the Cold War as her point of departure, she examines both extremes of mass utopia, dreamworld and catastrophe. The book is in four parts. "Dreamworlds of Democracy" asks whether collective sovereignty can ever be democratic. "Dreamworlds of History" calls for a rethinking of revolution by political and artistic avant-gardes. "Dreamworlds of Mass Culture" explores the affinities between mass culture's socialist and capitalist forms. An "Afterward" places the book in the historical context of the author's collaboration with a group of Moscow philosophers and artists over the past two tumultuous decades. The book is an experiment in visual culture, using images as philosophy, presenting, literally, a way of seeing the past. Its pictorial narratives rescue historical data that with the end of the Cold War are threatened with oblivion and challenge common conceptions of what this century was all about.
Comments: (3)
Peles
Buck-Morss's tale of the sputtering, guttering end of the modern Fordist disciplinary project both in the U.S.A and in the Soviet Union is a stunner. Most compelling are the historical insights -- told with particular elegance through the comparison of patriotic and advertising images -- that show how similar both projects really were! Some of the historical tidbits stick in the mind never to be dislodged: Daddy Stalin asking Henry Ford to come build him a factory to make tractors in the middle of the Depression. Lenin's admiration for Frederick Taylor. Amazing how the salvation for both communists and capitalists was the same industrial regime, the same worker's paradise of factory labor!
The second half of the book, a kind of diary of cross-cultural US/Soviet cultural exchanges prior to and after the Berlin Wall, is interesting but less intellectually energizing. Still, there is a great deal of wit in Ms. Buck-Morss's observation that Western Marxist critics such as Frederick Jameson (who attended some of the same seminars with Soviet intellectuals that Buck-Morss did) seem less willing to give up on the socialist dreamscape than their Soviet counterparts.
A great companion read is Michael Hardt's and Antonio Negri's "Empire" which really has an interesting take on the near simultaneous end of Fordism and the disciplinary state in both the U.S. and Soviet Union. They suggest it was the "multitude" or proletariat in both nations who rebelled against the industrial factory/modern project and destabilized both, an argument which runs counter to the usual top-down explanations for the rise of postmodern economics.
Interesting how we're told these days that the Soviets, now suffering in the hot bath of capitalism, are nostalgic for the certainty of the Daddy Stalin years. Perhaps their nostalgia is not so different than Baby Boomer Americans' nostalgia for the lost innocence of the early 50s/60s, the Golden Age of American economic hegemony, before the New Deal project finally collapsed. Now that the veil has dropped it seems we had a lot more in common with "them"(us) than we ever thought we did. And still do!
Arakus
'Dreamworld and Catastrophe' is a cry of anguish disguised as the interdisciplinary analyses of a (neo-)Marxist scholar. It is a fragmentary and tortured reaction to the betrayal of history, in the best of Walter Benjamin's tradition, consciously emulated in this tome by this leading authority on the Frankfurt School. It is painful to wade through the convolutions of denial, intellectualization and projection that constitute the first part ('Democracy' - the political framework). The next two sections ('History' and 'Mass Culture')are a joyride of erudition and an intellectual tour de force. The last part - a dry chronicle of the comings and goings of the author's milieu amidst the disintegration of the USSR and the emergence of Russia - is anti-climactic. The opus in its entirety does not fuflil the blurb's somewhat hubristic promise: 'This book offers a revaluation of the twentieth century'. Sam Vaknin, author of 'After the Rain - How the West Lost the East'
Legionstatic
Having been raised in the ideological wasteland of 20th century America, I found this book an interesting read. It could be seen as a vindication of Chomskii's idea that the Cold War was a fake, in which the 2 sides's respective leaders colluded to pick the pockets of their respective peoples in order to finance the buildup of huge military machines which could be used to suck the blood of the 3rd world. My main disappointment, aside from ocassional annoying forays into psuedo-intellectual gibberish (especially the Soviet "nomenklatura" variety,), was the author's failure to inquire into the cause of the socialistic failure, apparenty assuming the fact that the leaders of neither side actually had any interest in the welfare of their people was sufficient explanation. It seems more likely to me that the collapse of social welfare is an inevitable result of the global population-explosion (i.e. as the population increases & the competition for Earth's resources intensifies & grows increasingly vicious, things are bound to deteriorate). Considering that the Wise Men of yore warned us of this problem long ago (i.e. population-explosion becoming the "Beast of Armagedon" & threatening to drag us to our doom with it's 4 Horsemen of Famine, Plague, War, & Avarice when we had finished the job of replenishing the Earth), it's hard to understand why the global intelligensia don't get it. Perhaps the "dumbing-down of America" has taken it's toll on the rest of the world, as well.