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by Vincent Porter,Sue Harper

eBook British Cinema of the 1950s: The Decline of Deference download ISBN: 0198159358
Author: Vincent Porter,Sue Harper
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (December 15, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 420
ePub: 1512 kb
Fb2: 1548 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: rtf azw lit azw
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

Sue Harper, Vincent Porter. In this definitive and long-awaited history of 1950s British cinema, Sue Harper and Vincent Porter draw extensively on previously unknown archive material to chart the growing rejection of post-war deference by both filmmakers and cinema audiences.

Sue Harper, Vincent Porter. Harper and Porter explore the effects of social, cultural, and economic change on the 1950s film industry in Britain, looking in particular at the impact of the rise of television, successive changes in government policy, and the collapse of the studio system.

In this definitive and long-awaited history of 1950s British cinema, Sue Harper and Vincent Porter draw extensively on previously unknown archive material to chart the growing rejection of post-war deference by both filmmakers and cinema audiences.

British Cinema of the 19. .has been added to your Cart. Sue Harper is a Professor of Film History, University of Portsmouth.

In this definitive and long-awaited history of 1950s British cinema, Sue Harper and Vincent Porter draw extensively on previously unknown archive material to chart the growing rejection of post-war deference by both film-makers and cinema audiences. Competition from television and successive changes in government policy all forced the production industry to become more In this definitive and long-awaited history of 1950s British cinema, Sue Harper and Vincent Porter draw extensively on previously unknown archive material to chart the growing rejection of post-war deference by both film-makers.

The Decline of Deference. Sue Harper and Vincent Porter. The first comprehensive study of British cinema of the 1950s. Pays particular attention to producers and screenwriters. In this definitive and long-awaited history of 1950s British cinema, Sue Harper and Vincent Porter draw extensively on previously unknown archive material to chart the growing rejection of post-war deference by both film-makers and cinema audiences. Competition from television and successive changes in government policy all forced the production industry to become more market-sensitive.

Oxford University Press, USA. Book Format.

British Cinema of the 1950s: The Decline of Deference Height : . 4 In Length : . 0 In Width : . 6 In Weight : . 4 lbs British Cinema of the 1950s: The Decline of Deference Paperback. Oxford University Press, USA.

British Cinema of the 1950s: The Decline of Deference by Sue Harper, Vincent Porter Oxford University Press, 2003 p 43-45. Nelmes, Jill; Selbo, Jule (2015). Women Screenwriters: An International Guide. p. 645. ISBN 9781137312372. british screen scene. Televised Feature Results in Lawsuit -New Projects-Bright Inventory Work in Progress "Comeback" Rebuttal By STEPHEN WATTS. New York Times (1923-Current file) 23 June 1957: 93. ^ a b Neame p 156.

by Sue Harper and Vincent Porter. ISBN of the winning item: 019815934X. What type of media is this winner?: Book. Winner Detail Create Date

by Sue Harper and Vincent Porter. Title of a book, article or other published item (this will display to the public): British cinema of the 1950s: the decline of deference. Winner Detail Create Date: Thursday, September 23, 2010 - 07:28.

In this definitive and long-awaited history of 1950s British cinema, Sue Harper and Vincent Porter draw extensively on previously unknown archive material to chart the growing rejection of post-war deference by both film-makers and cinema audiences. Competition from television and successive changes in government policy all forced the production industry to become more market-sensitive. The films produced by Rank and Ealing, many of which harked back to wartime structures of feeling, were challenged by those backed by Anglo-Amalgamated and Hammer. The latter knew how to address the rebellious feelings and growing sexual discontents of a new generation of consumers. Even the British Board of Film Censors had to adopt a more liberal attitude. The collapse of the studio system also meant that the screenwriters and the art directors had to cede creative control to a new generation of independent producers and film directors. Harper and Porter explore the effects of these social, cultural, industrial, and economic changes on 1950s British cinema.