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by Damien Keown,Charles S. Prebish

eBook Introducing Buddhism (World Religions) download ISBN: 0415550009
Author: Damien Keown,Charles S. Prebish
Publisher: Routledge; 2 edition (January 28, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 344
ePub: 1195 kb
Fb2: 1332 kb
Rating: 4.4
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Subcategory: Humanities

The Middle Way: Journal of the Buddhist Society 82, no. 2 (August 2007): 123.

Charles S. Prebish holds the Charles Redd Chair in Religious Studies at Utah State University, US. Prebish holds the Charles Redd Chair in Religious Studies at Utah State University, USA. Damien Keown is Professor of Buddhist Ethics at Goldsmiths College, University of London.

such as my Asian Religions and Gender and Religion courses

Such pluralism-informed pedagogy works best in courses that deal with multiple religious traditions, such as my Asian Religions and Gender and Religion courses. Pluralism is best taught when the instructor’s understanding of pluralism is reflected in the pedagogy. Prebish and Damien Keown, two of today's leading Buddhist . Prebish and Damien Keown, two of today's leading Buddhist scholars, explain the key teachings of Buddhism, and trace the historical development and spread of the religion from its beginnings down to the present day. A chapter is devoted to each of the ma Introducing Buddhism is the ideal resource for all students beginning the study of this fascinating religion. Thus, the book Buddhism; World Religion is a well-composed book which talks about the religion, facts, and myths of Buddhism. The book Buddhism; World Religion has similarities and differences between Greek mythology and Buddhism.

The Middle Way: Journal of the Buddhist Society ww. hebuddhistsociety.

Introducing Buddhism - World Religions (Hardback). Charles S. Prebish (author), Damien Keown (author). Introducing Buddhism is the ideal resource for all students beginning the study of this fascinating religious tradition

Introducing Buddhism - World Religions (Hardback). Introducing Buddhism is the ideal resource for all students beginning the study of this fascinating religious tradition. It explains the religion's key teachings and traces its historical development and geographical spread of from its foundations up to present day. Prebish and Damien Keown, two of today's leading Buddhist scholars, devote a chapter each to the major regions where Buddhism has flourished - India, South-east Asia, East Asia and Tibet.

Introducing Buddhism by Prebish, Charles . Keown, Damien. Introducing Buddhism is the ideal resource for all students beginning the study of this fascinating religion. A chapter is devoted to each of the major regions where Buddhism has flourished: India, South East Asia, East Asia and Tibet. Prebish/Damien Keown. All Documents from Introducing Buddhism (World Religions Series). Get started today for free. buddhist people (final) 2011-07-16.

Introducing buddhism Prebish, Charles S. Keown, Damien Taylor . This book focuses on the religion& diversity and richness. Keown, Damien Taylor&Francis 9780415550017 Чарльз Пребиш: Введение в буддизм : Explaining the key teachings and historical development of Buddhism, this. Описание: Written by two leading Buddhist scholars, this book explains the key teachings of Buddhism and traces the historical development and spread of the religion from its beginnings.

Introducing Buddhism is the ideal resource for all students beginning the study of this fascinating religious tradition. It explains the religion’s key teachings and traces its historical development and geographical spread of from its foundations up to present day. Charles S. Prebish and Damien Keown, two of today’s leading Buddhist scholars, devote a chapter each to the major regions where Buddhism has flourished - India, South-east Asia, East Asia and Tibet. In addition, contemporary concerns are discussed, including important and relevant topics such as Engaged Buddhism, Buddhist Ethics, Buddhism and the Western World and Meditation.

This new edition includes more material on the different schools of Buddhism including explanations in graphic form, monastic life, popular religion, Buddhist ethics, ritual, the Bodhisattva Path, the Jatakas, the transmission of Buddhism, and class, gender and race.

Introducing Buddhism includes illustrations, extracts from original sources, summary boxes, questions for discussion, suggestions for further reading and a companion website at www.routledge.com/textbooks/9780415550017

Charles S. Prebish is Charles Redd Chair of Religious Studies at Utah State University. Damien Keown is Professor of Buddhist Ethics at Goldsmith's College, University of London. They are the editors of the Encyclopedia of Buddhism (Routledge, 2007).

Comments: (7)
Kulwes
Used tis book in my upper division Buddhism class and loved it. It is very informative and I really enjoyed reading it.
Ynonno
Great book that breaks down each topic within the chapters. Very easily digestible.
Coirad
Great for my class
Gavinrage
I bought this book for a Buddhism class. The content is clear and straightforward though sometimes it was a bit dry to read (hence the four stars). It was a decent book for introduction to such an interesting and different religion.
The Apotheoses of Lacspor
Great item, Great Seller
Narim
What follows focuses on only one question, that of Buddhist origins.

I have just received my copy of the paperback 2nd edition of "Introducing Buddhism" (2010) by Prebish and Keown, and am looking forward to working through it.

Where I am coming from. Early this year i) I began again practicing `mindfull meditation', reading various Buddhist authors, also Thomas Keating, and ii) and started a rather freeform study of Buddhist origins and the story of its constant re-invention through the centuries down to what has been happening since it began having major impact in `the West'; in Germany, France and England, and then in North America. (Way back when, its influence in China was such that there were Buddhist emperors; and in the process it went through a major reinvention).
My own studies through many decades have been focused on trying to keep up with biblical scholarship, to which I added as a response to 9/11 a year's 'cram' on Islam, its origins and historical development.

Now, at this late stage of my life, I am ready to start a more focused study of Buddhism, using "Introducing" to follow its many reinventions but not, alas, to get a good grasp of its historical origins.

Tags. Historical Methodology, Buddhism, Comparative Religion

It is disappointing to see that, after four years of reviews and discussion, the flawed second chapter, entitled "The Buddha", has not been substantially reworked for this new edition. It makes a good start with the sentence, "The problems in uncovering traces of the `historical Buddha' are similar to those faced in the search for the `historical Jesus'", but then its `downhill all the way'.
Anyone who knows anything about the exemplary 'Quest', knows that you have to start with the historical sources that seem to give some access; that you cannot say anything about the historical figure until you have listed them, and carefully evaluated them. But here "Introducing" is skimpy in the extreme, with some further remarks scattered here and there in the text. (The same is true of other well-regarded English-language Introductions; which may say something about the current state of Buddhist studiesin this country.)
And this is all the more remarkable in view of the nature of the early sources. The consensus-- accepted by P. and K.--seems to be that the primary source for the Buddha, his life and teaching, is the so-called `Pali Canon'.
This collection runs for thousands of pages. (The ET got out by Pali Text Society fills 43 volumes). It apparently emerged--in what is today Sri Lanka--a few decades before the start of the Common Era, that is, about three hundred years after the death of the Buddha! What a challenge for historically-minded scholars, but apparently one that does not interest the present authors.
The Pali language. This is recognized as a North India language, similar to what the Buddha would have spoken; or, rather, it is a somwhat artifical language resulting from the homogenous combination of several similar North Indian dialects. (Implication? Different part of the Canon were written in different dialects.)

[A neat image has just floated into my head: Imagine Lord Templeton, or some other enlightened `deep-pockets' guy, assembling a dozen leading Jesus questers for a surprise weekend--say somewhere high in the Rockies (all expenses paid); scholars from Germany, France, Russia etc-- as well as from North America.
The Friday evening they are led into a conference room where they find all 43 vols. of the Pali Society's ET on the table, also a couple of experts--one of them perhaps Japanese.
"Greetings,You have from now till Sunday afternoon to discuss the question
of the earliest Buddhism sources, and the problems their utilization
presents.Your are being invited to serve as 'outside experts' and to come
up with, a) an agreed list of eight or ten incisive remarks about the
challenge facing scholars of Buddhism here,
and b) a similar agreed list of the most important questions.
If you fail to do so, you will be invited, but not obliged, to pay 20% of
your expenses."

While awaiting this potentially epoch-making event in contemporary religious scholarship, here are a few of my questions, which I hope will spur some of you to come up with your own different or better ones.
A. i) Is it established that the `Pali Canon' is the earliest Buddhist writing (or at least the best preserved), or is it simply the earliest presently known to us? (Are there any early references to earlier ones?)
ii) What is its textual history? How many early texts do we have? Can they be dated? How similar are they--any important differences?
ii) How many current Buddhism scholars know the Pali language well enough to have simply read all 43 vols in Pali? [Tactless. See below.]*
iii) How many have done a thorough study that allows them to answer such questions as
a) Is this body of writing fully coherent, or does it contain significant differences, whether obvious or subtle?
b) Is there any evidence of other authors--perhaps `disciples'--in addition to the original one? If there is, how much came from them, how much from him?
iv) Through the modern era of Buddhist studies are there scholars (anywhere in the world) who have done such thorough studies? Could someone list them and outline and compare their major findings?
v)What are the leading scholarly hypotheses concerning the original process between the Buddha and his disciples--possibly over many years--which enabled them (or special groups among) to learn this vast body of writing by heart?
vi) What arguments have been made to establish that this vast body of oral tradition was faithfully maintained through several centuries?

(Apparently the superb medieval `Leningrad Codex' of the Hebrew Bible faithfully represents mss that were found among the Dead Sea Scrolls that date from 1000 or more years earlier. But a) here it is a question of faithful copying of writings and ii), other Dead Sea mss of some of the books differ significantly from the texts preserved so faithfully in the `Leningrad'. The grounds for this choice?)

Note: Many questions are suggested by the two densely-written pages on the Pali Canon that can be found in the Encyc. Britannica (printed and online).

Hypothesis to play with. Asoka, the great Buddhist emperor of India who reigned for many years about half-way between the time of the Buddha and the beginning of the Common Era, is supposed i) to have founded Buddhist universities, and ii) to have sent missionaries in every direction, including a daughter and son to Sri Lanka:
So perhaps he had written versions of the traditions made for these missionaries to take with them, lest the rigors of the journey affect their overloaded memories? Apparently the sources for Asoka are strong but limited. So, unless new ones emerge, there is no way to verify or deny this suggestion.

For the rest, I am looking forward to using "Introducing" for the historical developments, the creative re-inventions down to the present, of which it is a part.

*Tactless. I can still remember the day at a meeting of North American `Questers' when one distinguished scholar whispered to me, "You know, most of these guys are essentially NT scholars with a good knowledge of the sources but, unfortunately, little or no knowledge of Aramaic and Hebrew, and so they are insufficiently familiar with Jesus' cultural context, late 2nd Temple Judaism.
Contrast two great Jewish admirers of the Jewish Jesus, Geza Vermes (emeritus at Oxford) and the late David Flusser of Hebrew University, Jerusalem.
Rko
I cannot recommend this as a good introductory text on Buddhism. Although I respect the knowledge of the authors in the field of Buddhism, to have deep knowledge and to produce a readable introductory text are two separate things. One does not always lead to the other. The authors have written too much of this book like a condensed encyclopedia, thinking they need to name every significant person, term, or school of thinking, without offering much context or description. Consequently much of the review is dense, too short, and not very meaningful – i.e. very much in encyclopedia-style. In short, this is not a good introductory text for students. I think they will not be involved with the terminology and excessive ‘name and term’ dropping, while an overarching meaningful narrative is simply lacking.
Crowley, Vivianne. “Review: 'Introducing Buddhism' by Charles S. Prebish and Damien Keown.” The Middle Way: Journal of the Buddhist Society 82, no. 2 (August 2007): 123.

Written by an American and a British academic – Charles Prebish, Professor of Religious Studies at Pennsylvania State University, and Damien Keown, who will be well known to many members as Professor of Buddhist Ethics at Goldsmiths College, University of London – Introducing Buddhism is a clearly written text aimed at students of religious studies who are new to Buddhism. Geared to academic examinations, the text is presented with learning goals, summaries, discussion questions and further reading. Chapters cover how Buddhism has evolved in each of the main Buddhist regions, as well as contemporary issues such as Buddhism and War, Buddhism in the Western World and Meditation. There are useful Appendices giving a timeline of key events in Buddhist history (including the formation of the Buddhist Society in 1924), a list of main texts in the Pali, Chinese and Tibetan Canons and a Glossary. The book is supported by Routledge’s excellent online resources for students and teachers at www.routledge.com/textbooks/0415392357. These include for students many helpful features such as links to Buddhist Web Gateways, links to academic Buddhist journals, audio links to common Buddhist chants, and sample essay questions. For teachers, there is a model syllabus to support the text. This is a useful introductory book for both students and teachers.