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by Margaret J. Wiener

eBook Visible and Invisible Realms: Power, Magic, and Colonial Conquest in Bali download ISBN: 0226885828
Author: Margaret J. Wiener
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (April 15, 1995)
Language: English
Pages: 460
ePub: 1690 kb
Fb2: 1645 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: docx mobi lrf lrf
Category: Different
Subcategory: Humanities

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Visible and Invisible Re.has been added to your Cart. People present during the events that Wiener explores are now no longer living. Local documentary material has been lost, or would have been lost, but for Wiener's attentions.

Wiener challenges colonial and academic claims that Klungkung had no "real" power and argues that such claims enabled colonial domination. By focusing on Balinese discourses she makes clear the choices open to Balinese, both at the time of the Dutch conquest and in its narration

Wiener challenges colonial and academic claims that Klungkung had no "real" power and argues that such claims enabled colonial domination. By focusing on Balinese discourses she makes clear the choices open to Balinese, both at the time of the Dutch conquest and in its narration. At the same time, she shows how these discourses, which revolve around magical weapons acquired from invisible agents such as gods, spirits, and ancestors, offer an alternative understanding of Klungkung's power.

In this densely argued book, Margaret J. Wiener uses the event of the puputan to reflect on power in Bali and to challenge its representation in both colonial and academic writing.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Visible and Invisible Realms: Power, Magic and . Wiener challenges colonial and academic claims that Klungkung had no "real" power and argues that such claims enabled colonial domination. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 3 brand new listings.

Visible and Invisible Realms. Power, Magic and Colonial Conquest in Bali. By MARGARET J. WIENER. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995. Full text views reflects the number of PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. Total number of HTML views: 0. Total number of PDF views: 0 .

Dutch conquest of Badung with Pamecutan 1906. Visible and Invisible Realms; Power, Magic, and Colonial Conquest in Bali. Chicago & London 1995. Cokorda Ngurah Gede Pamecutan (of entire Badung 1946-1950, kepala 1950-1959; died 1986). Badung included in the Indonesian unitary state 1950.

In Visible and Invisible Realms: Power, Magic, and Colonial Conquests (winner of the Victor Turner Prize for Ethnographic Writing in 1995), I examined encounters between representatives of the Dutch colonial state and the paramount kingdom on the island of Bali (Indonesia) a.

In Visible and Invisible Realms: Power, Magic, and Colonial Conquests (winner of the Victor Turner Prize for Ethnographic Writing in 1995), I examined encounters between representatives of the Dutch colonial state and the paramount kingdom on the island of Bali (Indonesia) as rendered in colonial archives and in late 20th century Balinese memories and narratives. The book explores differing assumptions about the entities that constitute the world and differences in the exercise of power evident both in historical interactions and their narration.

Visible and Invisible Realms: Power, Magic, and Colonial Conquest in Bali. a b Hobart, Angela (2003). Healing Performances of Bali: Between Darkness and Light. University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0-226-88580-3. Helen M. Creese (2016). ISBN 978-90-04-31583-9. p. 151. ISBN 9781571814814. a b Hobart, Angela (1987). Dancing Shadows of Bali: Theatre and Myth. KPI. 48. ISBN 9780710301086.

Wiener, Margaret J. 1995. Visible and invisible realms: power, magic, and colonial conquest in Bali. The Buddhist conquest of China: the spread and adaptation of Buddhism in early medieval China. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Volume 11 of Sinica Leidensia. Thank you for reading books on BookFrom.

In 1908, the ruler of the Balinese realm of Klungkung and more than 100 members of his family and court were massacred when they marched deliberately into the fire of the Dutch colonial army. The question of what their action meant and its continued significance in contemporary Klungkung forms the basis of Margaret Wiener's complex anthropolological history.Wiener challenges colonial and academic claims that Klungkung had no "real" power and argues that such claims enabled colonial domination. By focusing on Balinese discourses she makes clear the choices open to Balinese, both at the time of the Dutch conquest and in its narration. At the same time, she shows how these discourses, which revolve around magical weapons acquired from invisible agents such as gods, spirits, and ancestors, offer an alternative understanding of Klungkung's power.Moving between Balinese and Dutch narratives and between past and present, Wiener critiques colonial accounts by recounting Balinese memories and interpretations. Her attention to history and local situations illuminates the ways in which colonialism and orientalist scholarship have obscured the power of indigenous rulers and shows how Klungkung, once Bali's paramount realm, was relegated to a peripheral corner of the Indonesian nation-state. Both as a fascinating story and as a rich example of interdisciplinary scholarship, this book will interest students of colonialism, anthropology, history, religion, and Southeast Asia.
Comments: (2)
Alexandra
Five stars!A very good book.
Iesha
Here is a meticulously gathered wealth of information, diligently evaluated, and presented in a carefully organized work of scholarship and insight. To even consider the tremendous challenge of viewing these, or any, segments of Bali's history as they actually are - - involving for the agents of that history itself both seen (empirical, verifiable, concrete) and unseen (folkloric, felt, metaphysical, illogical, inexplicable) elements in equal proportion - - is a daunting challenge. Wiener took on that challenge, and navigated its inherent ambiguities, admirably. The result is a book that has as much to offer to the general reader with an interest in Bali, as it does to scholars and academics. The sheer quantity of information gathered here from Wiener's informants and documentary material produced by Balinese sources, and foreign sources, related to the central historic moment of the Klungkung Puputan, is astounding. These documentary sources and informant interviews, reach far back and forward in time from the actual event of the Klungkung Puputan, giving Wiener's work a degree of credibility and validity that no scholarly work before or since, has exceeded. Wiener's work in researching and producing "Visible and Invisble Realms" should, and has, provided valuable avenues of further enquiry, for scholars not only in western academic institutions, but also institutions in Bali and elsewhere in Indonesia. A very important aspect of Wiener's research, is the sources and source material she was able to gather, just before it became lost forever. People present during the events that Wiener explores are now no longer living. Local documentary material has been lost, or would have been lost, but for Wiener's attentions. Here we have a fine work of rigorous scholarship, well-written, preserving first-hand accounts, perceptions, interpretations, and analysis related to one historic event, that would not have been available to Balinese and others ever again, had she not taken up the frankly, reckless challenge of pursuing this work. There is so much material in this volume to serve as the impetus for furthering the understanding and appreciation of Bali's idiosyncratic culture and largely self-constructed history, I expect ten generations of scholars and readers and people in Bali and outside of Bali who simply feel motivated to understand Bali better, will continue to refer to this text as a crucial touchstone in their own explorations. And it's important, I think, to mention that the book is a "ripping yarn," as well. Your "normal reader" will not regret diving headlong into the "Visible and Invisible Realms" and will surface with treasure and inspiration well worth the hours in the armchair reading this book.