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eBook Teaching as Story Telling: An Alternative Approach to Teaching and Curriculum in the Elementary School download

by Kieran Egan

eBook Teaching as Story Telling: An Alternative Approach to Teaching and Curriculum in the Elementary School download ISBN: 0226190323
Author: Kieran Egan
Publisher: University of Chicago Press; Reprint edition (March 15, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 132
ePub: 1719 kb
Fb2: 1162 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr rtf azw lrf
Category: Different
Subcategory: Education

Teaching as story telling. model given on p. 41 of the book in various curriculum areas. As these implications influence. both curricula and methods of teaching, this is no small matter.

Teaching as story telling. the book a basis for more interaction, and perhaps informality, than. has been the norm in a print based environment. Second, the general conception of education as a cumulative, progressive, additive process tends to encourage blindness towards the losses.

In telling a story one does not begin by stating objectives, and yet stories are wonderful tools for efficiently organizing and communicating meaning" (Egan, p. 38). He uses his formula for story in the curriculum to address a variety of thematic units

In telling a story one does not begin by stating objectives, and yet stories are wonderful tools for efficiently organizing and communicating meaning" (Egan, p. He uses his formula for story in the curriculum to address a variety of thematic units.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Preparatory thinking in Heidegger’s teaching.

Teaching as Story Telling book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Teaching as Story Telling: An Alternative Approach to Teaching and Curriculum in the Elementary School as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

With the availability of fresh story books in the market, teachers are provided with many choices.

2) Caters to students of diverse backgrounds Since storytelling is present in almost all cultures at any given time, it can help bridge cultural gaps in a diverse classroom. Telling stories from countries where your student came from creates awareness, deeper understanding, and appreciation of their differences. When students have deeper understanding of their individual backgrounds, creating a cooperative classroom with diverse cultures can be made easy. With the availability of fresh story books in the market, teachers are provided with many choices.

With An Imaginative Approach to Teaching, Egan provides educators with new . Kieran Egan provides such a conception in his book. From the Foreword by Elliot W. Eisner, Stanford University.

With An Imaginative Approach to Teaching, Egan provides educators with new ways to promote creativity in the classroom. This book is an essential resource for all educators. The school train, Egan warns us, is lost in a confusion of philosophical dead-end tracks: we need new directions, new signs and signals to help us rethink the journey. Teaching as Story Telling.

In teaching and learning processes, when the teachers tell stories while the students listen, they focus on meaning first through using imagination and visualizing the events and almost everything in the stories in their minds.

Teaching as story-telling. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Using Nikola Tesla’s story and experiments, as presented in the film The Prestige, to promote scientific inquiry

Teaching as story-telling. A study of student engagement in science with implications for curriculum and teaching. Unpublished paper, University of the Aegean. Hadzigeorgiou, . & Fotinos, N. (2007). Using Nikola Tesla’s story and experiments, as presented in the film The Prestige, to promote scientific inquiry. Interchange, 41, 363–378. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. & Skoumios, M. (2013). The development of environmental awareness through school science: Problems and possibilities.

"I am very impressed by the practicality of [Egan's] introduction of the use of story-forms in curriculum for young children. His model is fascinating, and its various possibilities in a range of fields makes it worth a good look by many kinds of teachers."—Maxine Greene, Teachers College, Columbia
Comments: (4)
Anarus
The author provides a new perspective in what teaching is all about. Anyone familiar with contemporary pedagogy will recognize the bureaucratic understanding of lesson planning, objectives, and assessments. It's not that those things aren't important, but that what really drives good teaching is the ancient art of storytelling. If the lesson doesn't take the student deeper into the mystery of human existence, what value can it have? This is what I take to be Egan's point: teachers transmit the rich history of human experience, success and failure, through artful storytelling.
Altad
Egan had some really great ideas about the role of imagination and emotion in student learning. He also points out some commonly believed principles that are used in schools that do not stand up to the realities of child development. The story form model is a creative approach to planning lessons and teaching students, but Egan's examples seem to be too dramatic to actually use with young children. I think the story form model would work well if used on occasion, but it will not be dominating my classroom.
Burisi
"The educational achievement is not to make the strange seem familiar, but to make the familiar seem strange. It is seeing the wonderful that lies hidden in what we take for granted that matters educationally" (Egan, p. 47). In this book, Egan walks the reader through the elements of incorporating story across the curriculum as a way to interest students deeply in their learning and improve their understanding and retention of the material. Mr. Egan brings his ideas to life with lesson planning, thorough explanations and a bevy of how-to advice.
"What we call imagination is also a tool of learning- in the early years perhaps the most energetic and powerful one" (Egan, p. 17). We must remove the drudgery from our children's learning and allow them to make meaning from their lessons. Egan's asserts that as children learn a subject using ad hoc principles, they lose their passion for the subject matter and retention of important ideas. When they are steeped in the mundane duties of worksheets and memorization of facts, it removes the meaning from their learning and only encourages them to "get through" the lesson so they can move on to the next task. "So, perhaps ironically in the face of presently dominant ad hoc principles, it is the most profound and important aspects of a topic that need to be brought to the fore if we want young children to understand it" (Egan, p. 45).
Egan uses examples from a cross section of themes to demonstrate the applications of story in the curriculum. He quotes Aristotle, "There is nothing in the mind except that which has passed through the senses" (p. 11). "In telling a story one does not begin by stating objectives, and yet stories are wonderful tools for efficiently organizing and communicating meaning" (Egan, p. 38).
He uses his formula for story in the curriculum to address a variety of thematic units. The overall structure of learning this form is to identify the most important ideas; identify why it should matter to kids; identify what is affectively engaging about the material; identify bipolar opposites (good/evil, rich/poor, freedom/slavery); organize the content into story form (using the above elements);conclusion- resolution of conflict and mediation; evaluation of understanding, importance and content learned.
Using this format, he gives several examples of units that could be brought into the elementary school including some that would normally be considered "over their head." These include themes in language arts, science, math and social studies. He encourages teachers to try to bring stories into all units as a method of communicating in a language that all kids speak. "A model for teaching that draws on the power of the story, then, will ensure that we set up a conflict or sense of dramatic tension at the beginning of our lessons and units. Thus we create some expectation that we will satisfy at the end" (Egan p. 26).
I liked his easy way of explaining how to bring story into the classroom. He helps me, as the beginning teacher, understand how this perspective will help me reap more rewards out of teaching and help my students gain a better meaning for their learning. "As teachers are our professional story-tellers, so the curriculum is the story they are to tell" (Egan, p. 109). With its creative perspective, Teaching As Storytelling has merit to any teacher, regardless of how proficient they are in their subject areas. Although he recognizes the difficulties in practical application, he asserts that the inspiration for this book came from watching what good teachers already practice. He is adamant that the lessons children recall in later life most often follow the story-form model. "What is usually most educationally effective is telling children good stories about their world and about the variety of human experience in it" (p. 115). Is it not the job of all educators to bring meaning and knowledge to students to enrich their lives?
Kirizan
This is the teaching method I use for my boys. It is by far the easiest way to grab the children's attention as opposed to worksheets. I've taught many math and science concepts using this method, which Egan suggests. Thinking back in my years in school, I remember topics relayed to me in story form but nothing out of a textbook or worksheet. Many literature books have changed the world because they capture peoples attention; I suggest implementing Kieran Egan's suggestions.