carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » OurSpace: Resisting the Corporate Control of Culture

eBook OurSpace: Resisting the Corporate Control of Culture download

by Christine Harold

eBook OurSpace: Resisting the Corporate Control of Culture download ISBN: 0816649553
Author: Christine Harold
Publisher: Univ Of Minnesota Press; 1 edition (April 24, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 232
ePub: 1221 kb
Fb2: 1105 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr azw lit docx
Category: Different
Subcategory: Communication and Journalism

On Jan 1, 2007, Christine Harold and others published OurSpace: Resisting the Corporate Control of Culture.

In a textual analysis of another hoax performed by the Yes Men, Hynes et al. (2007) argued that culture jamming gains significance from its novelty. 18). Other studies have categorized The Colbert Report and Saturday Night Live's ''weekend update'' segment as potential examples of culture jamming (Harold, 2007).

Download books for free. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

1 online resource (xxxiii, 190 pages) : In OurSpace, Christine Harold examines the deployment and limitations of culture jamming by activists. For Harold, it is a different type of opposition that offers a genuine alternative to corporate consumerism. Exploring the revolutionary Creative Commons movement, copyleft, and open source technology, Harold advocates a more inclusive approach to intellectual property that invites innovation and wider participation in the creative process. Includes bibliographical references (pages 167-186) and index.

In OurSpace, Christine Harold examines the deployment and limitations of culture jamming by activists. These techniques defy repressive corporate culture through parodies, hoaxes, and pranks

In OurSpace, Christine Harold examines the deployment and limitations of culture jamming by activists. These techniques defy repressive corporate culture through parodies, hoaxes, and pranks. Among the examples of sabotage she analyzes are the magazine Adbusters’ spoofs of familiar ads and the Yes Men’s impersonations of company spokespersons.

Resisting the Corporate Control of Culture. Author: Christine Harold. In OurSpace, Christine Harold examines the deployment and limitations of culture jamming by activists. And it offers us strategies of survival in and resistance to the increasingly corporatized digital realm. Siva Vaidhyanathan, author of The Anarchist in the Library: How the Clash Between Freedom and Control is Hacking the Real World and Crashing the System.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking OurSpace: Resisting the Corporate Control of Culture as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

War and Democracy in the Age of Empire. eISBN: 978-0-8166-5434-5. Subjects: Marketing & Advertising.

Author Christine Harold organizes her argument into. Readers interested in the effect of the media environment on our lives will appreciate OurSpace: Resisting the Corporate Control of Culture, a critical examination of the public discourse surrounding the influence of multinational corporations, marketing, and branding. At the center of this examination is a reconsideration of the insurgent cultural and political movement loosely known as "culture jamming," and an analysis that questions the practicality of its strategies.

When reporters asked about the Bush administration’s timing in making their case for the Iraq war, then Chief of Staff Andrew Card responded that “from an marketing point of view, you don’t introduce new products in August.” While surprising only in its candor, this statement signified the extent to which consumer culture has pervaded every aspect of life. For those troubled by the long reach of the marketplace, resistance can seem futile. However, a new generation of progressive activists has begun to combat the media supremacy of multinational corporations by using the very tools and techniques employed by their adversaries.

In OurSpace, Christine Harold examines the deployment and limitations of “culture jamming” by activists. These techniques defy repressive corporate culture through parodies, hoaxes, and pranks. Among the examples of sabotage she analyzes are the magazine Adbusters’ spoofs of familiar ads and the Yes Men’s impersonations of company spokespersons.

While these strategies are appealing, Harold argues that they are severely limited in their ability to challenge capitalism. Indeed, many of these tactics have already been appropriated by corporate marketers to create an aura of authenticity and to sell even more products. For Harold, it is a different type of opposition that offers a genuine alternative to corporate consumerism. Exploring the revolutionary Creative Commons movement, copyleft, and open source technology, she advocates a more inclusive approach to intellectual property that invites innovation and wider participation in the creative process.

From switching the digital voice boxes of Barbie dolls and G.I. Joe action figures to inserting the silhouetted image of Abu Ghraib’s iconic hooded and wired victim into Apple’s iPod ads, high-profile instances of anticorporate activism over the past decade have challenged, but not toppled, corporate media domination. OurSpace makes the case for a provocative new approach by co-opting the logic of capitalism itself.

Christine Harold is assistant professor of speech communication at the University of Georgia.