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eBook Wealth Effects and Monetary Theory download

by Richard J. Sweeney

eBook Wealth Effects and Monetary Theory download ISBN: 0631158464
Author: Richard J. Sweeney
Publisher: Blackwell Pub; First Edition (US) First Printing edition (August 1, 1988)
Language: English
Pages: 344
ePub: 1854 kb
Fb2: 1889 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf doc azw mbr
Category: Different
Subcategory: Business and Finance

Read by Richard J. Sweeney.

Read by Richard J.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Richard J Sweeney books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Wealth Effects and Monetary Theory. Exchange-rate Policies For Emerging Markets.

Wealth Effects and Monetary Theory. by Richard J Sweeney. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9780631158462 (978-0-631-15846-2) Hardcover, Blackwell Pub, 1988. Find signed collectible books: 'Wealth Effects and Monetary Theory'.

by Richard J. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780631158462.

Modern Monetary Theory or Modern Money Theory (MMT) is a heterodox macroeconomic theory that describes currency as a public monopoly for the government and unemployment as evidence that a currency monopolist is overly restricting the supply of the f. .

Modern Monetary Theory or Modern Money Theory (MMT) is a heterodox macroeconomic theory that describes currency as a public monopoly for the government and unemployment as evidence that a currency monopolist is overly restricting the supply of the financial assets needed to pay taxes and satisfy savings desires. MMT is an evolution of chartalism and is sometimes referred to as neo-chartalism

The effects hold little promise of allowing discrimination among classes of models.

The effects hold little promise of allowing discrimination among classes of models. Thus, ceiling and asymmetry regularities do not allow discrimination between Keynesian and monetarist ceiling models.

Modern Money Theory: A Primer on Macroeconomics for Sovereign Monetary Systems. Example: Economic systems of the future is lacking the negative effects of the totalitarian economies. Looks like authors never lived under the totalitarian economic systems that they write about. Other than that good information on MMT, theory, practical examples, many definitions, graphs, calculations etc.

Opponents charged that Hamilton's plan to refinance the federal government's debt generated "enormous profits" for undeserving speculators. In a real options approach to valuing the defaulted debt, the data are consistent with the view that price fluctuations were responses to surprises in price-relevant information.

Money and monetary theory. Money is any asset that is acceptable in the settlement of a debt. For an asset to be widely used as money, it should be portable, divisible, durable and stable in value. As soon as a monetary authority attempts to regulate the money supply to reduce inflationary pressure, the stable relationship that might have existed between money (M) and prices (P) will break down, and attempting to control M is likely to fail.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

"Wealth Effects and Monetary Theory" returns to the key but recently neglected issues of how changes in price variables - particularly the aggregate price level and the interest rate - affect wealth and hence the economy's behaviour. The real balance effect as found in the current literature is but a special case of the more general effects that the book examines. Professor Sweeney contends that, though consumers may feel better off when inflation and interest rates fall, the real effect on wealth of these changes is, to all intents and purposes, zero. Movements in conventional measures of wealth do not in general correspond to the changes in wealth the book finds. This throws into doubt the large amount of empirical work that uses conventional measures of wealth. The book has an important degree of topicality because of its view of budget deficits. For example the US deficit is currently causing considerable anxiety among Western governments. The book is aimed at professional macroeconomists and graduate students.